The single biggest reason why start-ups succeed | Bill Gross! $ Video

The single biggest reason why start-ups succeed | Bill Gross, NEF6.COM


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The single biggest reason why start-ups succeed | Bill Gross


The single biggest reason why start-ups succeed | Bill Gross, NEF2.COM


The single biggest reason why start-ups succeed | Bill Gross

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WHY TRAVEL INSURANCE IS VERY IMPORTANT ? HOW TO TAKE TRAVEL INSURANCE. \ Video

WHY TRAVEL INSURANCE IS VERY IMPORTANT ? HOW TO TAKE TRAVEL INSURANCE, NEF6.COM


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WHY TRAVEL INSURANCE IS VERY IMPORTANT ? HOW TO TAKE TRAVEL INSURANCE, REMMONT.COM


WHY TRAVEL INSURANCE IS VERY IMPORTANT ? HOW TO TAKE TRAVEL INSURANCE

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Why You Should Rent vs Own | Phil Town! and Video

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Why You Should Rent vs Own | Phil Town, NEF2.COM


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Why You Should Rent vs Own | Phil Town


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Why You Should NOT Buy a New Car – ReadyForZero Blog #rc #car


#what car should i buy
#

Why You Should NOT Buy a New Car

17 Oct 2012 by Ben

Welcome to the 5th  Smart Money Debate at ReadyForZero . To see the other side  of this debate, read Miranda s post: Why You Should Buy a New Car (Not Used). And then let us know which argument was more convincing!

Buying new things is fun. I love unwrapping the shiny packaging, opening up the box, and smelling the factory made scent of something brand new. There is nothing quite like holding something in your hands that nobody else has ever used. It makes you feel well special.

You know what makes me feel even more special than buying something brand new? Saving money. That is why almost everything I purchase is used. Don t get me wrong I m not one to purchase a used pair of Hanes. However, with most items, you can find great deals if you are willing to buy used. This is especially true when it comes to major purchases like cars.

While I wouldn t recommend buying any old lemon, buying used cars is the only thing that makes sense financially. Our family has purchased new before, and we consider it to be one of the biggest financial mistakes we have ever made. Here is why we will never buy a new car again and neither should you!

Reason #1: New Cars Don t Hold Their Value

We ve all heard this before, but it bears repeating: a new car begins losing value the minute that you drive it off the lot. How much value you ask? According to Edmunds.com, a new car loses approximately 10% of its value as soon as you drive away. 10%. Furthermore, it loses about 20% of its value after the first year, and 10% off the original purchase price per year after that. Depending on the make and model of your new car, you may have lost up to 80% of the value from the purchase price within 5 years!

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Would you invest $25,000 in the stock market if you knew that you were going to lose $2,500 the moment you completed the transaction? Would you buy a house for $200,000 if you knew for a fact that it would only be worth $180,000 the minute you were handed the key and $160,000 a year later. Of course you wouldn t! No sane person would. Why would you do the same thing with a car? Let somebody take that huge financial hit by buying the new car. Then, you can take advantage of their silliness and buy the car used after they trade it in a few years later.

Reason #2: Used Cars are Cheaper

Since new cars are clearly a poor investment, it makes sense that the sticker price for used cars is far less expensive than the newer models. For instance, a brand new 2012 Toyota Prius is currently selling for around $28,500. Earlier this year, we were able to purchase a used 2009 Prius with under 25,000 miles for only $17,500. While red isn t exactly my favorite color, I was happy to suffer through it in order to save $11,000.

Reason #3: Less Worry

You know the nervous feeling that you get when you buy something new? You become very protective of it. You don t want anything to spill or scratch it. You re so proud of it that you want it to stay looking all brand new and shiny for forever. That is why you bought the product new in the first place. Afterall, what good is a new car if it doesn t actually look new.

I hate to tell you this, but eventually everything that is new is going to become blemished. When it does, you may be devastated especially if you spent as much money on it as you would a car. Why not save yourself all of that worry, headache, and stress? Just buy your cars used. A nick, dent, or scratch doesn t seem like such a big deal then.

Reason #4: Warranties are Available

People who tell you to buy a new car will tout the great warranties with which new cars come. Guess what. Most used cars will come with a warranty as well. In fact, the most important warranty the manufacturer s powertrain warranty should still be in effect as long as the car has not exceeded its age or mileage limits. This warranty covers all of the big stuff that might break like your engine or transmission. So, the warranty argument doesn t really hold water. If the warranty is in effect, the argument that you are going to have to pay for more repairs to a used car than you would for a new car doesn t really work either.

Reason #5: A New Car is a Bad Investment

Have I mentioned that a new car loses 10% of its value the moment you drive it off the lot and 20% of its value over the first year alone. Oh, I did? Good. Well, this is so important that I m mentioning it again. If that new car smell is still tempting you, go back and read Reason #1 to help snap you back into reality. Then, go out and buy a New Car Smell air freshener to put in your used car, and save yourself thousands of dollars.

As you can see, buying a new car is not the best decision for your finances. While that new car smell may make you feel like you are loaded, buying a new car is just another way of trying to look wealthy. It is a status symbol that savvy spenders can do without. If you re in the market for a new car, do yourself a favor and buy a used one instead.

No matter what you decide, use ReadyForZero to track your debt payoff it s a free online tool that helps you stay motivated and pay off your debt in the fastest time frame possible.

To see the other side  of this debate, read Miranda s post: Why You Should Buy a New Car (Not Used). And then let us know which argument was more convincing!

This post was published by Ben, Content Manager and Writer for » ReadyForZero. ReadyForZero is a company that helps people get out of debt on their own with a simple and free online tool that can automate and track your debt paydown.



Why your new car is dropping in value so fast #design #a #car


#new car values
#

Why your new car is dropping in value so fast

You know that sinking feeling you get in your stomach when you drive your brand-new car off the dealer lot and you know it just lost a huge chunk of value as soon as its tires hit the public roads? Yeah, well that feeling is about to sink even lower into the pit of your stomach. Used car values are expected to drop significantly in 2015, which is a boon to used car buyers but a pain for everyone else.

The reason for all of this comes down to fairly basic economics: supply and demand. According to a newly released study by Black Book and Fitch Ratings, used car inventories and lease returns are expected to grow by 10 percent in 2015. With the market flooded, prices naturally fall. The research indicates the average vehicle depreciation rate increasing to 14.5 percent for the year, a return to pre-recession levels. In comparison, used vehicle lost just 12.1 percent of their value in 2014.

Anil Goyal, vice president of analytics and strategic partnerships for Black Book, said low gas prices could hurt smaller cars because fewer buyers will be focusing on buying fuel-efficient vehicles. But as the economy grows stronger – particularly the housing market and in the service economies – truck prices will stay stable. The car makers will likely moderate production of trucks to balance production with actual demand, he predicted.

Morgan Stanley predicted the trend towards lower used car prices last year. With new car sales growing in the US, it inevitably means more pre-owned vehicles eventually coming to market. Furthermore, longer-term loans with low monthly payments are reportedly enticing buyers towards new models.

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LAWRENCEVILLE, GA (February 3, 2015) Vehicle depreciation is expected to accelerate in 2015 as increased used-car supply and larger off-lease volumes place pressure on retention rates, according to the latest joint vehicle depreciation report from Black Book and Fitch Ratings, Inc. Click here to download the full report.

According to the report, 2014 new vehicle sales finished the year at 16.5 million units, and Black Book is forecasting new vehicle sales to finish north of 16.7 million units in 2015. The annual depreciation rate on used vehicles in 2014 was 12.1%, slightly lower than its initial forecast. Black Book believes annual depreciation levels on used vehicles will continue to trend toward pre-recession historical rates and climb to 14.5% in 2015.

“2014 depreciation was defined by pockets of volatility due to seasonality, harsh weather patterns and falling fuel prices impacting smaller cars and trucks of all sizes,” said Anil Goyal, Vice President of Analytics and Strategic Partnerships for Black Book. “Looking ahead, lower consumer demand and CAF -driven model competition will place higher depreciation pressure on smaller car segments particularly, but trucks should have stable retention in 2015 due to balanced production levels and strong housing and service economies.”

Fitch believes higher vehicle depreciation in 2015 is not expected to have a significant impact on overall auto asset-backed securities (ABS) performance. Fitch expects U.S. auto loan ABS loss rates to rise in 2015 but not have a significant impact on overall performance.

Fitch’s outlook continues to be stable for prime asset performance and positive for ratings performance, consistent with 2014.

According to Fitch, residual value (RV) performance of U.S. auto lease ABS transactions moderated in 2014 with lower gains ending December 2014 at a 3.87% gain, down from 7.23% a year earlier as vehicle values crept lower during the year while used volume rose.

Looking ahead, used vehicle inventory levels and lease vehicle returns will continue to increase in 2015 by over 10%, along with higher vehicle trade-in volumes. These trends will drive RV losses higher throughout the year, but not impact ratings performance. The outlook for asset and ratings performance for auto lease ABS is stable for 2015, despite these negative trends.

The Black Book-Fitch vehicle depreciation report is a joint venture by the two companies utilizing Black Book’s used vehicle depreciation data, and Fitch’s U.S. auto ABS indices data.

Black Book tracks used vehicle market depreciation rates providing an understanding of how vehicle prices impact automobile lenders and lessors, auto ABS transactions, consumers and other auto market constituents.

“Leveraging accurate and timely collateral data trends from Black Book are critical to auto lenders especially given the changing landscape for risk potential in 2015,” said Hylton Heard, Senior director of Fitch Ratings.

The Black Book-Fitch Vehicle Depreciation Report is available for download by clicking here.



Why do I have to disengage 4-wheel drive? News and reviews. #ex #police #cars #for #sale


#4 wheel drive cars
#

Why do I have to disengage 4-wheel drive?

Boston.com Correspondent | 12.01.15 | 3:53 PM

Q. I have been leasing a 2014 Toyota 4Runner since June 2014. Now that winter is around the corner I would like to get your opinion about a problem I experienced last winter while driving with four-wheel-drive engaged (4H). When I would make turns or back up, I would have to disengage the four-wheel drive mechanism. It was as if the emergency brake was applied. There was no problem while driving straight ahead or when driving in 2-wheel drive. I only use 4-wheel drive when road conditions dictate. I brought the 4Runner to the dealership to have the problem checked and the mechanic told me there was nothing wrong. The technician said that is how 4 x 4 s work, power needs to be evenly distributed to all four wheels and that does not happen when making turns and/or backing up. I told him I never experienced this problem with my old 2003 and 2006 4Runners, which also required turning a dial to engage the 4-wheel drive mechanism. I have also owned other 4 x 4 makes/models and never experienced this issue with any of them. I thought maybe I was crazy, but when I mentioned the issue to friends who own 4 x 4 s, they all say it is not normal. I have read a few blogs from other Toyota 4Runner owners complaining about the same problem. Can you shed any light on this problem?

A. The repair tech is correct that there will be a drag when driving in reverse or turning but it shouldn t be as if the parking brake were on. I have driven many Toyota products off-road and there are many instances where the vehicle needs to be in four-wheel-drive and it is necessary to back-up or take tight turns. On a dry road in four-wheel-drive you will get a sensation of crab-walking or wheel-tripping and that sensation would be normal for most any traditional the four-wheel-drive. I recently drove the 2016 Tacoma off-road and although, I could feel the four-wheel drive system on turns or in reverse there was never a sense that I needed to switch out of four wheel drive to maneuver the truck. I would return to the dealer and go for a road test on a gravel road and demonstrate your concerns.

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Q. I have 2015 Lexus RX 350 and want to add a trailer hitch. I don t plan on towing a trailer at this time, but plan to use the trailer hitch for a bike rack or cargo rack. I have seen trailer hitches priced from $150.00 to more the $250.00 with labor to match. Is this something I can do myself?

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A. There are several companies that make custom trailer hitches (Reese, Valley, and Draw-Tite among a few). These hitches are all pre-assembled and in the case of your Lexus would just bolt to the frame. You will need to move one exhaust hanger temporarily before you bolt the hitch in place, but this is about as complicated as it gets. With the help of a friend, the installation shouldn t take more than 60 minutes.

Q. Last week I was driving my daughter s 2014 GM Arcadia, and I noticed it had a calibrated heat gauge, which I like. However, the engine ran at 210 degrees. My Toyota and Nissans have 180 degree thermostats and get plenty hot. I always thought that engine temperatures above 190 degrees, was the beginning of engine meltdown. Is there any issue with these high engine temperatures and engine longevity?

A. There was a time when 160 degrees was typical of a normal operating engine, but over the years engine temperatures have gone up. Today we see most engines operating at 185-205 degrees and even higher as in the case of your GMC. These higher temperatures are accomplished with a mixture of engine coolant and system pressure. A 50/50 mix of water and coolant raises the boiling point of water to 223 degrees and for each pound of system pressure raises the temperature by 2 degrees. A system running a 16 pound radiator cap and the proper mix of coolant would raise the boiling point to 255 degrees. Even at these temperatures there will be no damage to the engine.

Q. I have a question and a concern about driving my 2014 Toyota Camry. The first is, I worry about other drivers and how every accident seems to be a way for someone to make money. The second issue is I wish I ordered my car with navigation. Would it be possible to have an aftermarket dash cam installed to protect me if I was involved in a crash? The second question can a factory navigation system be installed in a car that didn t come with one?

A. Yes a skilled installer at a mobile audio store could certainly do the work and the end result would most likely look similar to the factory system. They could also easily put a dash cam in place, most likely mounted near the rear view mirror and essentially out of sight. A simpler solution might be a combination GPS and dash cam. Garmin has a new product- the NUVI Cam LMT. This unit replicates some of the best features found in new cars. It uses voice commands, real time traffic updates, forward collision warning and lane departure warning systems. There is a built in dash-cam that saves video files on an impact/crash. The maps are very good and when you are approaching your destination the display switches to a camera view to easily identify the destination in real time. My only complaint with this unit is it is big. The overall dimensions are 4 inches by 7 inches and takes up a fair amount of dash/windshield real estate.

Q. My 2005 Dodge Caravan did something weird the other day when I went to start it. After I turned the key, all the gages went to full range, fluctuated and then went back to normal. It did start and ran good the rest of the day. When I tried to start it the next day, it did the same thing. I also noticed that the red flashing security light went out and never came back on. It has been about a week now and the car starts and runs fine, what do you think caused this?

A. This type of problem is usually related to a poor electrical connection. I would look at the main battery cables and well as all the grounding points. Some of these older Caravans also had issues with the instrument clusters. If it is the instrument cluster there is no easy repair other than replacing the circuit board on the back of the gauge cluster.



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Updated April 13, 2012

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Incorporating in Delaware: Advantages and Disadvantages

Delaware is a tiny state, but it has an outsized importance in the world of corporations. Nearly half of the nation’s publicly traded companies, including giants like Apple, Coca-Cola, Google and Wal-Mart, are incorporated in Delaware.

Delaware has a long history of corporation-friendly laws. In addition, Delaware’s tax laws allow corporations to be taxed at a low rate in Delaware and avoid higher taxes in their home states.

Should your business incorporate in Delaware. Here are some of the advantages and disadvantages of choosing The First State as your corporation’s home.

For many years, Delaware has tried to position itself as a welcoming home to corporations.

Its laws are generally favorable to businesses, and, unlike other states, it has a separate Court of Chancery that hears cases involving corporate law. Chancery judges have a background in corporate law, and can decide cases relatively quickly, without the need for a jury. This, coupled with the large number of corporations that call Delaware home, means that Delaware has an unusually well-developed and predictable body of corporate law.

These predictable laws allow corporations to make better assessments of the probable outcomes of litigation or the advisability of settling a case.

Delaware has also been called a tax haven. It does not collect corporate taxes from Delaware corporations that do not do business in the state. It also does not tax royalty payments or other “intangible assets.” These tax policies lead to substantial savings for some corporations, but you should consult a tax professional to find out if incorporating in Delaware will provide any tax benefits for your business.

You can form a corporation more quickly in Delaware than in just about any other state, and, unlike some states, Delaware does not require you to publicly disclose the names of the corporation’s directors or shareholders.

Finally, venture capitalists and other outside investors often prefer to invest in a Delaware corporation.

Disadvantages of Incorporating in Delaware

If your business is not physically located in Delaware, you’ll face some additional costs and obligations if you decide to incorporate there. These include:

The cost of registering to do business in your home state and any other states in which you do business (called foreign qualification ). You’ll pay these fees in addition to the fee for incorporating in Delaware.

The cost of a registered agent. If you incorporate in Delaware, you are required to name a registered agent with an actual street address in Delaware to receive legal documents on behalf of your corporation. Unless you know someone in Delaware who is willing at act as your registered agent, you will have to hire a company to provide this service for you.

Franchise taxes. All Delaware corporations must pay an annual franchise tax based on the value of the corporation’s shares. The tax starts at $75, plus a $50 filing fee, and can be as high as $180,000.

Annual reporting requirements. In addition to making any required reports in your home state, you will also have to comply with Delaware’s annual reporting requirements.

If your business is small and does business in only one or two states, the additional costs of incorporating in Delaware may well outweigh the benefits.

How to Incorporate in Delaware

To form a Delaware corporation, you must file a certificate of incorporation with Delaware’s Secretary of State, listing the name of your corporation, its purpose, the number of authorized shares of stock, the name and address of your registered agent, and the names and addresses of the incorporators.

Because the name of your corporation must be different than the name of any other Delaware corporation, Delaware LLC or partnership, it’s a good idea to make sure your business name is available before you file incorporation documents. You can conduct a Delaware corporation search online.

Forming a corporation is an exciting step in the life of your business, but you should think carefully before choosing a state for your incorporation. For some businesses – especially those with outside investors and a nationwide scope – Delaware’s predictable body of law and corporation-friendly tax structure make it a clear choice. But other businesses are better off incorporating in their home states.

Unsure if incorporating in Delaware is right for you? Consult with a tax professional through the LegalZoom business legal plan .

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What is a Content Delivery Network (CDN)? #advantages #of #cdn,advantages #of #content #delivery #network,cdn,content #delivery #network,content #delivery #network #technologies,content #delivery #networks,content #delivery #networks #architecture #diagram,technologies #used #in #cdn,what #is #cdn,what #is #content #delivery #network,why #cdn,why #content #delivery #network


#

What is a Content Delivery Network?

Various Web 2.0 technologies have transformed the Internet and the Internet is now enabling content to be delivered in various forms Text, Images, Flash, Audio, Video, etc. When companies need to serve such diverse forms of content, most of the time, they distribute them by hosting them in servers in their data center(s). But the consumer pattern is not always uniform. There may be sudden bursts of traffic requesting web based content from consumers located around the globe. To accommodate for the demand, companies need to estimate and provision additional servers in quantities enough for handling peak loads. More over, on the Internet, there is always a factor of RTT (Round Trip Time) and Packet Loss that needs to be considered, and these parameters have a higher effect on the consumers who are located at greater distances from the servers.

It is to accommodate for these limitations, that Content Delivery Networks were created. A Content Delivery Network is a network of servers hosted by a service provider in multiple locations of the world (usually shared with multiple customers) so that the content could always be served from a server that is nearest to the consumer requesting for it. And besides, since multiple servers are used, the load is distributed and consumers get better quality content, faster. There are many more advantages to a CDN, which we will see in the final section of this article.

A Content Delivery Network (CDN) consists of two components: The Origin Server(s) where the content to be distributed over Internet is originally stored Cache Server(s) where the content is duplicated. There is generally one Origin Server (either in the customer s data center or in the cloud, with the content delivery network service provider for example) and many cache servers (in multiple locations across the globe) so that, when a consumer is requesting a particular content on the Internet, it can be served by a cache server nearest to the consumer s geographical location if the content is available there. Other wise, cache server fetches the content quickly from the origin server after protocol/route optimizations.

Content Delivery Networks provide the following (at a glance):

  • Serving the content from the closest possible geographic location to minimize network latency.
  • Replication (Caching) and deployment of large number of servers to minimize the server latency.
  • Capacity On Demand.
  • Monthly charges as per the content delivery (without high initial investments).
  • Application Acceleration, Compression, Protocol optimization, etc.
  • Route optimization (to identify and route traffic through the best/shortest/least congested route between origin server and cache servers.
  • Static/ Dynamic/ Encrypted content optimization and faster delivery.

Some technologies used by Content Delivery Network (CDN):

Apart from Caching and geographically accessible placement of servers, content delivery networks employ many more technologies to make sure that the content is delivered faster and more efficiently to the consumers. Some of the common technologies employed by CDN are given below to get an idea.

  • While the static content can be cached on the cache servers to be served immediately to the consumers, dynamic content/ embedded objects etc, cannot. So, CDN takes advantage of the http request procedure: When a website is requested, the html is served first, and the embedded objects are served on the subsequent round trips/ requests. So, cache servers store the html parts of frequently accessed content and that is served first, while the embedded objects are requested from the Origin server simultaneously by the cache servers so that by the time the request from the consumer comes for embedded objects, they are already present, and can be served immediately.
  • The fastest and the least congested route (between the cache server and the origin server) is estimated continuously, and the traffic is sent in that route. The communications between the various servers in the CDN are always optimized for performance.
  • The geographically nearest cache server is chosen by the CDN for serving requests. But, if those servers are being utilized to their full capacity, the users are automatically re-routed to the best cache server (irrespective of the distance) that can serve the consumer at that point of time.
  • Some CDN s can prioritize the Interactive/ multimedia traffic in their networks to improve their performance.
  • CDN can use Pull or Push technologies, or both. A pull technology requests for content from the origin server on the receipt of a request from consumers, and also saves it in the process. A push technology involves origin server pushing out all content to cache servers before hand.
  • Some CDN s send multi-cast streams from the origin server to the cache servers and there-on send uni-cast streams to individual users. This can save a lot of bandwidth and processing resources for the origin server.
  • Protocol optimization is used extensively in CDN. For example, multiple handshakes required for establishing / tearing down web connection with http is replaced with a set of long lived and persistent connections (for connections between cache servers and origin servers). This also allows for multiple http requests to be sent using a singe connection, all of which reduce the tame taken for serving requests.
  • Data can be compressed en-route, saving bandwidth and enabling faster responses.

Advantages of Content Delivery Network (CDN):

  • Some CDN s are large enough to accommodate thousands of servers across many networks in multiple countries. This gives a good reach and ensures that users from many countries get fast and reliable access to content.
  • Content Delivery Networks allow for monitoring (and proactive fault rectification) of various parameters like successful delivery of content, traffic patterns/ peak times etc. Some of them even allow for real time notifications of threshold values set by the customers.
  • When compared to in-house hosting, content delivery networks are advantageous because there is no high initial investment in hardware/ bandwidth/network required as most CDN s charge per month and only for the amount of content delivered.
  • CDN s are the best way to serve a large number of random users across the globe through the Internet. Alternative technologies like application delivery controllers can accelerate applications over WAN but require that these hardware devices be present in sending as well as receiving locations.
  • Reduced content delivery latency / reduced load on origin server.
  • Easy, fast and on-demand scalability .
  • Best technology to handle unexpected peaks in web traffic.
  • CDN s are highly redundant as requests can always be transferred to other servers (if one of them is down) and hence they almost provide 100% availability .
  • Integration with authentication/ encryption systems are supported by CDN.
  • Few CDN s also distribute content using Peer to Peer technology where a large number of user PC s are used to deliver content to nearby users. These networks can expand to support virtually unlimited users especially with the latest developments in P2P like Peer Assignment Algorithms that distribute the traffic more efficiently between peers.
  • CDN s reduce RTT (Round Trip Time) between the users and servers as servers are located near the users.

excITingIP.com

In case you want to add any points or have any questions you can use the comment form below or contact us using the contact form. You could also keep yourself updated with the various technologies in the computer networking domain by subscribing with your email address in the sidebar box mentioned as Get Email Updates When New Articles are Published .

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What Is a SaaS Cloud Suite #why #saas


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Oracle Software as a Service

What Is a Software-as-a-Service Cloud Suite?

Software as a service (SaaS) allows users to subscribe and use application software in the cloud. A modern cloud suite provides complete software for your entire business so that you can subscribe to certain SaaS applications as needed, such as: accounting, HR, procurement, project management, service, sales management, marketing, transportation management, and supply chain.

A modern SaaS cloud application suite enables users to personalize software for their role. With a modern SaaS suite, you can easily connect your entire business from any device, anywhere. You can connect to other clouds and integrate to existing systems. Modern SaaS applications are designed to be secure at every layer of the cloud. Modern best practice processes and embedded data-driven intelligence are built-in not added in later. Oracle s complete, modern SaaS applications offer you all this from the industry s most flexible, proven, and secure cloud infrastructure.

How to Survive in the Age of Digital Disruption

Businesses look to compete in new ways in the digital age. What do digital disrupters have in common? How do they use cloud computing technology to their advantage? Use this digital disruption assessment checklist as a guide to gauge your readiness to:

  • Identify key parts of your business ripe for fast improvement
  • Conduct a regular process to assess that you are using the right digital metrics
  • Innovate key parts of your business as you go
  • Impose minimal business disruption and reduce costs
  • Examine, identify, and launch a new business model

Modern Cloud Applications Design

Learn more about Oracle’s complete, data-driven, personalized, connected, and secure cloud.

Learn how to exploit enabling technologies to achieve more, faster—and with fewer resources.

Build a collaborative, efficient, and intuitive back-office hub with the latest mobile and analytics technologies.

Drive predictable performance, report with confidence, and connect the entire organization.

Accelerate supply chain innovation and drive smarter, faster decisions at any point during a product’s lifecycle.

Give your enterprise the power of Oracle’s rich HR, talent management, and social solutions with the speed and convenience of the cloud.

Strengthen customer relationships with a platform that improves service consistency and ensures repeatable service quality.

Discover the most comprehensive analytics offering in the cloud, combining BI, big data analytics, and embedded SaaS analytics.



10 cheapest cars: Why (almost) nobody buys them #0 #car #finance


#cheapest used cars
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Story Highlights

    Nissan Versa sedan is lowest-price new car at $12,780 Dealers seldom stock bare-bones models Most buyers demand more features

522 CONNECT TWEET 50 LINKEDIN 61 COMMENT EMAIL MORE

Cheap new cars can be a disappointment zone.

If you go looking for the $12,780 2014 Nissan Versa sedan that went on sale Tuesday as America’s lowest-price new car, good luck. Dealers almost never stock the lowest-price model.

They say nobody buys the bottom version, and shoppers say that’s because they aren’t available. Automakers say the so-called “take rate” for the lowest-price version of any model runs from 2% to 5%.

Using that new Versa as an example, the bottom-price model has a manual transmission. Few can or will drive a stick-shift nowadays. Moving up to the conventional four-speed automatic adds $1,000.

And you still don’t have the high-mileage version you probably saw advertised.

That’s the one with the CVT (continuously variable-ratio automatic transmission), which is rated an appealing 40 mpg on the highway. Lowest-price CVT model is the S Plus, starting at $14,580, including shipping.

Suddenly, instead of a chops-licking, less-than-$13,000 new car, you’re getting close to $15,000.

At which point buyers often start thinking about nicely equipped, lightly used cars instead of new ones.

It’s not just Nissan. Most automakers price their vehicles that way.

Of course, there’s more profit in even slightly higher-price models, so that’s what car companies want to make and dealers want to keep on the lot and in the showroom.

In addition to being hard to find, bare-bones cars just aren’t that desirable, even among those who swear they “just want basic transportation.” Often “basic” means sans air conditioning, power windows and a radio.

Power windows sounds like a luxury until you picture yourself reaching from the driver’s seat across the car to hand-crank the passenger-side window.

Using Versa again, the average transaction price is $16,092, according to research and shopping site TrueCar.com. Three cars have lower average transaction prices: SmartForTwo ($14,264), Chevrolet Spark ($14,707) and Mazda2 ($15,528).

Transaction price is all-in, out the door, so it includes taxes and license fees as well as factory rebates, shipping and dealer discounts.

And cheap-to-buy often isn’t cheap to own. A low-price vehicle frequently depreciates faster than a more expensive car, so at trade-in time, the gap between the value of what you have and what you want is pretty big. Depreciation is the single biggest cost of owning a car, but often overlooked because it doesn’t hit until years after you buy the car.

The 10 cheapest new cars in the U.S.

The list was complied by kbb.com and USA TODAY research. Rankings are based on sticker prices, including shipping charges. All are 2013 models except the 2014 Versa.

•Nissan Versa S Sedan, $12,780

•Chevrolet Spark LS Hatchback, $12,995

•Smart ForTwo Pure Coupe, $13,240

•Ford Fiesta S Sedan, $13,995

•Kia Rio LX Sedan, $14,350

•Ford Fiesta S Hatchback, $14,995

•Chevrolet Sonic Sedan, $14,995

•Toyota Yaris 3-door, $15,165



Is there reboot or restart log to explain why or what? Windows 7 Help Forums #is #there #reboot #or #restart #log #to #explain #why #or #what?, #windows, #seven, #microsoft, #windows #7, #windows #7 #forums, #windows #7 #tutorials, #windows #help, #support, #dell, #acer, #hp, #asus


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Windows 7: Is there reboot or restart log to explain why or what?

Random re-boots are a difficult thing to trace as the actual event does not give the operating system time to react and write an error message – you may find some clues in the Event manager – but this may be misleading as the actual cause of the re-boot is rarely logged.

To find the Event Log right click on Computer and select manage

The most common cause of random re-boots is probably the Power supply but of course there are other possibilities.

First things to do is check that the specification of the PSU is sufficient for the hardware installed

Keyboard Logitech Wireless K710 K400
Mouse Logitech Wireless MX Master M570 Trackball
PSU Aerocool Templarius Imperator 750W 80+ Silver
Case AeroCool X-Warrior Devil Red Tower
Cooling Stock CPU, Rear 120mm, Front 2x120mm, Side 2x120mm
Hard Drives Internal Crucial 256GB SSD, WDC WD30EZRX-00D8PB0 3TB, Toshiba HDWD130 3TB Seagate ST2000DM001-1CH1 2TB, External (USB3) Seagate Backup+ Hub BK SCSI Disk 8TB 2.5/3.5 Hot Swap Cradle, USB3 + eSata (client HDDs) NAS Seagate ST4000DM000
Internet Speed Orange Fibre Broadband 37Mb/s Down – 9.5Mb/s Up
Antivirus Bitdefender Total Security 2017 Multi-device
Browser Chrome (always run latest Non-Beta)
Other Info Also run. Desktop – 6Core 8GB – Windows 10 Enterprise x64, Laptop – Quad 8GB – Windows 10 Pro x64 Netbook – Ubuntu Not used often 😉 2 x Nexus 7 Android tablets Samsung 10.2 tablet + Keyboard and Logitech T620 Mouse Sony Z3 Android Smartphone HTC One Android Smartphone

Also having this problem

I am also having this problem. It’s happened 2 or 3 times so far (I got a new machine a couple of months ago) and it always happens when I am away and the machine is idle. At first I thought it was Windows Update but I have that set to not install without my telling it to do so. I looked at the Task Manager and figured out how long the system has been up, so I went to System Events and found the events after the reboot. I’ve got this message after it restarts:

The system has rebooted without cleanly shutting down first. This error could be caused if the system stopped responding, crashed, or lost power unexpectedly .

The first message after the reboot is at 11:40:32am and the previous message was at 10:17 so there is nothing obvious there (I guess it could show that it was not a clean shutdown since there are likely lost messages). I checked my C: disk for files modified around 11:40 to see if I could figure out what was going on when it rebooted. At 11:38, there is activity in
C:\Users\bill\AppData\Local\Microsoft\Feeds\FeedsStore.feedsdb-ms

Also FeedsStore.feedsdb-ms and Internet Explorer Suggested Sites

feed-ms in the same directory structure.

Obviously other files might have been updated right before the reboot but they’ve been updated since then.

I doubt this has anything that will help solve the problem but hopefully the next person who has it will add their information and maybe we can figure it out.

Quote: Originally Posted by MisterBill2

I am also having this problem. It’s happened 2 or 3 times so far (I got a new machine a couple of months ago) and it always happens when I am away and the machine is idle. At first I thought it was Windows Update but I have that set to not install without my telling it to do so. I looked at the Task Manager and figured out how long the system has been up, so I went to System Events and found the events after the reboot. I’ve got this message after it restarts:

The system has rebooted without cleanly shutting down first. This error could be caused if the system stopped responding, crashed, or lost power unexpectedly .

The first message after the reboot is at 11:40:32am and the previous message was at 10:17 so there is nothing obvious there (I guess it could show that it was not a clean shutdown since there are likely lost messages). I checked my C: disk for files modified around 11:40 to see if I could figure out what was going on when it rebooted. At 11:38, there is activity in
C:\Users\bill\AppData\Local\Microsoft\Feeds\FeedsStore.feedsdb-ms

Also FeedsStore.feedsdb-ms and Internet Explorer Suggested Sites

feed-ms in the same directory structure.

Obviously other files might have been updated right before the reboot but they’ve been updated since then.

I doubt this has anything that will help solve the problem but hopefully the next person who has it will add their information and maybe we can figure it out.

run the program and it will tell you why your computer crashed.

this has worked great for me.

Display Driver stopped working, will not reboot, restart loop
Hello, first time posting here, so be gentle, graphics card: ATI Radeon HD4870 x2 running on windows 7 x64 ultimate so i have had this problem before, basically i was browsing away and my whole pc froze, with a strange little box around my cursor, although the sound was still working, i.

Crash dump failed to initialize x2 on each reboot/restart
Friends I’d like to rid myself of this annoyance: on each startup/restart/reboot I get a pair of these errors, about 15 seconds apart. System is a P4 desktop, 4GB ram, conventional hdd, windows 7 ulti x64. appreciate your advice z

BSOD Help and Support

Monitor loses signal during reboot after install requiring restart
HP Pavilion Elite HPE-170t CTO Desktop PC HP 2509M Monitor connected with HDMI cable Windows 7 64-bit I bought this pc from HP in 2010. It ran perfectly until i got a virus a few months back and lost both hard drives due to corruption and had to start from scratch. I had a local.

Hardware Devices

Windows 7 reverts back to old wireless profile on reboot,restart,wake
😡 Windows 7 continues to revert back to the old wireless profile despite me deleting all old wireless profiles. Wireless adapter is Edimax EW-7128g, newest drivers for Windows 7 64bit First set up a WEP profile the usual manner by connecting using the bottom-right wireless networking.

Network Sharing

[REBOOT] Sudden Random Reboot and black screen at start up!
– x64; – the original installed OS on the system: Windows 7 fresh install; – full retail version; – What is the age of system (hardware): less than one year; – What is the age of OS installation: less than three months. Hello, this morning my elitebook 8540w suddenly rebooted and during.

BSOD Help and Support

On overheat/sleep/reboot BSOD flash and auto-reboot
I purchased my HP Compaq 8710p laptop from Purdue University in May of 2008. A little after that it was stolen from me. Thankfully I had it LoJack secured, and they were able to recover it in London. When I got my computer back, however, the Windows XP that it had come pre-installed with was.

BSOD Help and Support



Why Diesel? #spain #car #hire


#diesel cars
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Why Diesel?

Today’s diesel vehicles are clean, quiet and fun-to-drive, and many consumers are learning diesel is an environmentally conscious option that does not sacrifice power or performance.

Why Diesel?

Clean diesel cars, trucks and SUVs typically achieve an impressive 20 to 40 percent improvement in fuel economy and 10 to 20 percent reduction in emissions when compared to a similar gasoline powered vehicles (www.fueleconomy.gov ). Recent advances in emission control technology, combined with the introduction of ultra-low sulfur diesel fuel in 2006 enabled diesel-powered cars and pickup trucks to be certified for sale in all 50 states, generating greater interest in this new generation of clean diesel cars and SUVs. These changes, combined with market success of a limited range of existing diesel products have prompted vehicle manufacturers to consider diesel as a new option for passenger vehicles or to expand the number of diesel offerings available.

Clean diesel engines eliminated black smoke since 2007 with the introduction of new particulate filters. And because diesels deliver up to 40 percent better real-world fuel economy. national fuel economy standards for cars and light-duty trucks beginning in 2017 are also expected to be met in part by an increasing number of clean diesel passenger vehicle choices. Today’s diesel vehicles are clean, quiet and fun-to-drive, and many consumers are learning diesel is an environmentally conscious option that does not sacrifice power or performance. Clean diesel technology in today’s properly maintained vehicles emits near zero levels of emissions. Exhaust from new clean diesel trucks is so clean it passes the “white handkerchief test.” If you hold a handkerchief next to the tailpipe and rev the engine, it stays white – picking up no smell or black soot. That’s why we call it #cleandiesel.

Clean diesel is not a “bridge” concept or “down-the-road” expectation – these vehicles are on the road right now providing impressive hybrid-like mileage and meeting the same emissions standards as gasoline vehicles. Just as important is the fact that automakers are introducing more diesel-powered models every year and consumers are warming up to the efficiency and unique characteristics of the powertrain. In fact, many drivers report fuel economy benefits that consistently rival a hybrid, and exceed EPA window stickers posted mileage. These vehicles are clean with low CO2 emissions, they provide great performance, they are renewable fuel-ready and most important – they are available to the American public right now.

While diesel passenger vehicles currently make up a modest 2.88 percent of the entire U.S. vehicle market, Diesel Technology Forum has collected consensus forecasts from auto and market analysts who predict that diesel cars, pickups and SUVs will comprise about seven percent of the market by 2020 or just over one million diesel-powered cars and trucks on the road, saving almost eight million tons of carbon emissions and about 24 million barrels of crude oil.

Auto analysts and other comparative studies have also determined a significant savings that diesel owners experience compared to gas vehicle owners based on fuel costs, resale value and operating costs. Diesel vehicles saved owners as much as $2,000 to $6,000 in Total Cost of Ownership (TCO) during a three to five year period when compared to similar gasoline vehicles.

Biofuel Compatible

Diesel technology’s future value is further enhanced by its suitability for hybrid applications and its readiness to use a diverse range of first and second generation renewable and biodiesel fuels making diesel a clean and sustainable choice.

Diesel engines were originally invented to run on vegetable oils. Today, most diesel engines can run on high-quality blends of biodiesel with little modification as well as next-generation, drop-in renewable diesel fuels which offer even further benefits. This flexibility of the diesel platform can accelerate the introduction of these renewable diesel fuels across the economy.

Diesel drivers have the option to fill up with blends of biodiesel at the pump. Most new and existing diesel vehicles and equipment are compatible with lower level biodiesel or renewable diesel fuel blends, between five percent and 20 percent depending on manufacturer warranties.

When powered with a blend of five percent biodiesel, or B5, the anticipated growth in the light-duty car fleet will save a further 200 million gallons of gasoline and reduce CO2 emissions by a further 150,000 tonnes by 2023.

Top 10 States of Diesel Drivers in 2014 – Total Diesel Passenger Vehicles

Top 10 States of Diesel Drivers in 2014 – Highest Percentage of Diesel Passenger Vehicles


Home – Integrity Outsource #why #outsource #hr


#

Welcome to Integrity Outsource

Running a business is difficult. The larger it gets the more difficult it becomes. Administrative tasks like payroll and human resources are not profit centers and should be outsourced to experts.

At Integrity Outsource we take paperwork off of your desk and free your calendar to focus on the vital factors that matter.

Our PEO will save you time and allow you to get back to business; no more HR headaches or payroll hassles. A quick consultation to cover your needs our professionals will have you up and running in no time.

Our people, systems, software, and experience bring value to your company. We have a heart for service, respond quickly to client needs and business owners, Chief Financial Officers and Office Managers love us; we think you will too.

CLIENT TESTIMONIALS

“Thank you to you and your team for your support and hard work in making this transition as smooth as possible.” Owner, In Home Healthcare Company “Thanks very much. And this was incredibly quick…I really appreciate you.” Owner, Franchise Restaurant “Thank you! Once again. You are wonderful!” Owner, Franchise Hair Salons “Thank you very much for the quick response and these documents (job descriptions). They are terrific.” Executive Director, Non-profit Youth Sports Organization “Thank you so much! I have a lot to learn and truly appreciate your taking the time to explain.“ CFO, Real Estate Development Company “Thanks! You guys are ‘awesome’ from the little stuff to the big stuff! You guys so Rock! Thank you” Office Manager, Interior Design Company “I approved the payroll, that was super easy. Your system much more intuitive.” Owner, Retail Store “It’s been nothing short of a pleasure since we came on board with Integrity Outsource, I am happy to take the time to congratulate you on your fantastic team!” Office Manager, Interior Design Company “I think this is a great solution! Thanks for being there for us.” Senior Administrative Assistant, Non Profit for Special Needs Kids “I really appreciate the great customer service. You really went the extra step to help us out. Have a great weekend.” President, Healthcare Management Company “Thank you for the login, you are correct, the site is clean and simple! You have been fantastic to work with and I will definitely refer to you for future clients PEO needs!” Medical Doctor “Best customer support goes to. you! THANK YOU” Owner, In Home Healthcare Provider

HR NEWS

MEMBERS OF



Why You Should NOT Buy a New Car – ReadyForZero Blog #rental #car #cheap


#what car should i buy
#

Why You Should NOT Buy a New Car

17 Oct 2012 by Ben

Welcome to the 5th  Smart Money Debate at ReadyForZero . To see the other side  of this debate, read Miranda s post: Why You Should Buy a New Car (Not Used). And then let us know which argument was more convincing!

Buying new things is fun. I love unwrapping the shiny packaging, opening up the box, and smelling the factory made scent of something brand new. There is nothing quite like holding something in your hands that nobody else has ever used. It makes you feel well special.

You know what makes me feel even more special than buying something brand new? Saving money. That is why almost everything I purchase is used. Don t get me wrong I m not one to purchase a used pair of Hanes. However, with most items, you can find great deals if you are willing to buy used. This is especially true when it comes to major purchases like cars.

While I wouldn t recommend buying any old lemon, buying used cars is the only thing that makes sense financially. Our family has purchased new before, and we consider it to be one of the biggest financial mistakes we have ever made. Here is why we will never buy a new car again and neither should you!

Reason #1: New Cars Don t Hold Their Value

We ve all heard this before, but it bears repeating: a new car begins losing value the minute that you drive it off the lot. How much value you ask? According to Edmunds.com, a new car loses approximately 10% of its value as soon as you drive away. 10%. Furthermore, it loses about 20% of its value after the first year, and 10% off the original purchase price per year after that. Depending on the make and model of your new car, you may have lost up to 80% of the value from the purchase price within 5 years!

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Would you invest $25,000 in the stock market if you knew that you were going to lose $2,500 the moment you completed the transaction? Would you buy a house for $200,000 if you knew for a fact that it would only be worth $180,000 the minute you were handed the key and $160,000 a year later. Of course you wouldn t! No sane person would. Why would you do the same thing with a car? Let somebody take that huge financial hit by buying the new car. Then, you can take advantage of their silliness and buy the car used after they trade it in a few years later.

Reason #2: Used Cars are Cheaper

Since new cars are clearly a poor investment, it makes sense that the sticker price for used cars is far less expensive than the newer models. For instance, a brand new 2012 Toyota Prius is currently selling for around $28,500. Earlier this year, we were able to purchase a used 2009 Prius with under 25,000 miles for only $17,500. While red isn t exactly my favorite color, I was happy to suffer through it in order to save $11,000.

Reason #3: Less Worry

You know the nervous feeling that you get when you buy something new? You become very protective of it. You don t want anything to spill or scratch it. You re so proud of it that you want it to stay looking all brand new and shiny for forever. That is why you bought the product new in the first place. Afterall, what good is a new car if it doesn t actually look new.

I hate to tell you this, but eventually everything that is new is going to become blemished. When it does, you may be devastated especially if you spent as much money on it as you would a car. Why not save yourself all of that worry, headache, and stress? Just buy your cars used. A nick, dent, or scratch doesn t seem like such a big deal then.

Reason #4: Warranties are Available

People who tell you to buy a new car will tout the great warranties with which new cars come. Guess what. Most used cars will come with a warranty as well. In fact, the most important warranty the manufacturer s powertrain warranty should still be in effect as long as the car has not exceeded its age or mileage limits. This warranty covers all of the big stuff that might break like your engine or transmission. So, the warranty argument doesn t really hold water. If the warranty is in effect, the argument that you are going to have to pay for more repairs to a used car than you would for a new car doesn t really work either.

Reason #5: A New Car is a Bad Investment

Have I mentioned that a new car loses 10% of its value the moment you drive it off the lot and 20% of its value over the first year alone. Oh, I did? Good. Well, this is so important that I m mentioning it again. If that new car smell is still tempting you, go back and read Reason #1 to help snap you back into reality. Then, go out and buy a New Car Smell air freshener to put in your used car, and save yourself thousands of dollars.

As you can see, buying a new car is not the best decision for your finances. While that new car smell may make you feel like you are loaded, buying a new car is just another way of trying to look wealthy. It is a status symbol that savvy spenders can do without. If you re in the market for a new car, do yourself a favor and buy a used one instead.

No matter what you decide, use ReadyForZero to track your debt payoff it s a free online tool that helps you stay motivated and pay off your debt in the fastest time frame possible.

To see the other side  of this debate, read Miranda s post: Why You Should Buy a New Car (Not Used). And then let us know which argument was more convincing!

This post was published by Ben, Content Manager and Writer for » ReadyForZero. ReadyForZero is a company that helps people get out of debt on their own with a simple and free online tool that can automate and track your debt paydown.



Free-Trade Cars: Why a U. S. Europe Free-Trade Agreement Is a Good Idea – Feature – Car and Driver #car #hire #spain


#trade cars
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The United States and the European Union consider a free-trade agreement. Finally.

cheaper cars, dirt-cheaper trucks

The standard tariff for importing cars to the U.S. is 2.5 percent of their value. For pickup trucks and commercial vans, the tariff is a whopping 25 percent. Individual European countries don t charge import duties, but the European Union charges a flat rate of 10 percent on imported automobiles. In simple terms, tariffs are taxes. They re paid to governments by the businesses that import and export products and are factored into the prices we pay. Virtually every country in the world charges tariffs to some degree. With the proposed TTIP in place, the tariffs on cars and about a billion other products exchanged across the Atlantic would almost definitely disappear.

revitalizing manufacturing

‘merica

Suffice it to say, automakers are eager to see the TTIP enacted. The American Automotive Policy Council. which represents Chrysler, Ford, and GM, issued a statement supporting the negotiations, calling for an ambitious agreement to eliminate tariffs. Unlike NAFTA. the 1994 free-trade agreement that resulted in a rush of factory relocations to Mexico, the European-U.S. deal could very well establish the United States as a major exporter.

A senior Volkswagen executive tells us that when Silao, Mexico, recently won out over the U.S. as the site of a new engine factory, it wasn t because of the cheaper labor. It s [Mexico s] free-trade agreement with the E.U.



5 Reasons Why I Don’t Have Solar Panels on My #why #are #solar #panels #good


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5 Reasons Why I Don’t Have Solar Panels on My Roof. Yet

Living near Boulder, Colorado, we enjoy more than 300 days of sunshine every year. That’s more than Miami or San Diego have. We have a south-facing two-story home with the roof positioned about optimally for panel arrays. Several of my neighbors have large arrays, and the colorful trucks and cars of solar install crews and salesmen are as plentiful as the neighborhood rabbits.

So, why don’t my wife, Char, and I go with the flow and get a great deal on a rooftop solar installation?

Well, I agree that rooftop solar is generally a good thing for a whole lot of reasons, but because of the following, I’m just not ready…yet.

1. Not Yet Economic…for me

Solar installation costs have fallen to less than $4/Watt and a few states have reached ‘grid parity’ — meaning that power from those panels costs the same as that provided by the local utility grid. As far as I can tell, Colorado, where I live, isn’t one of those states, even though we have plenty of sunshine. That’s because the economics depend so heavily on various tax and rate incentives, which vary from state to state. It’s not just a matter of cheap panels.

Panels are expected to drop to less than $2/Watt by 2020, and by 2017, Colorado will probably reach true grid parity, again assuming incentives stay the same. That’s only two years away — another reason to wait a bit before pulling the trigger.

2. Big Changes Coming

A major drawback to rooftop solar is that it produces peak power around noon, before it’s needed for afternoon system peak. Now California is incentivizing solar installers to turn the panels more towards the west/southwest. That practice (like everything else from the Golden State) will most likely spread eastward and impact installation design and credit from time-of-use (TOU) net metering.

Then there is the aesthetics issue — you know, part of the reason you bought your house in the first place? You can bet that after the present wave of buyers subsides, panel manufacturers will be offering designs that don’t have the visual impact (I’m being polite here) of what we see now.

And, speaking of the ugliness factor, I’d probably jump on the opportunity to install the new solar shingles that I saw at DOW’s demonstration home, if they were cheap enough. They or their competition will be available at an acceptable price some day, and I don’t want to be stuck with an obsolete unattractive technology.

I think I’ll wait and see what’s coming down the pike.

3. Unrealistic Lifetime Expectations

We bought a minivan when they first came out. It had all the features: electric doors, windows, you name it. But, 250 miles later, none of that stuff worked except the digital radio, which was stuck on a Japanese talk station. Although the engine ran just fine we couldn’t sell it and we finally gave it away

That’s what happens to all assets. They wear out, get obsolete. Solar panels are no different. Twenty-year lifetime? I don’t think so. And if you think you’ll keep them that long, imagine how they’ll look next to your neighbor’s new ones, designed to look and perform much better. If you can afford it, you’ll probably upgrade to save the value of your house, even if the panels are still working.

That’s why I hesitate getting into a long-term lease or any arrangement based on potentially unrealistic projected lifetime costs.

4. Social Un-Fairness

Solar installations are realistically available only to homeowners who are financially secure and have good credit. Even the incentives are designed for those with a decent level of income. For example, the federal tax credit of 30% is attractive only to those with the income to generate a tax liability high enough to take advantage of it.

Of course, the whole financing system can be gamed. If the home owner doesn’t have a high enough tax liability, third-party ownership of the installation can also take advantage of the tax credits and share some back to the home owner through a leasing arrangement. That’s part and parcel of offers by some installation companies.

But rooftop solar benefits aren’t available to renters, to low-income folks, the jobless or those trying to recover from joblessness. Nevertheless, these folks help to pay for the state, federal, local and any utility incentives going to the privileged rooftop solar owners.

That bothers me, and I’m not sure I want to be a part of all that. I’ll reconsider when unfair incentives go away.

5. Uncertain Utility Standby Arrangements

Many in the solar industry don’t think rooftop solar owners should pay their (fair) share of utility standby costs. Some of this vocal reluctance comes from ignorance of how a utility sets rates based on capital costs of infrastructure. Then there’s the elitist argument that the societal, ecological benefits and utility value of adding solar are so great that the residential solar owner shouldn’t pay any fixed charge whatsoever for a grid connection.

But, which many admit, the biggest heartburn is that adding an additional cost will make solar even more uneconomic, even with incentives.

An alternative for solar purists is to buy enough panels and battery storage to go completely off-grid. And maybe get some lanterns for those prolonged cloudy periods when the solar system batteries get low. That would be ideologically admirable, if economically dumb.

So, I’m uneasy about getting a free ride while someone else pays for my utility hook up. I’ll wait and see what shakes out.

Still, I have friends and colleagues who are strong renewable energy advocates. They argue that no matter what, going with solar is the noble way to go, because regardless of cost or other factors, by golly it helps lower greenhouse gases. And, they add, though it may not be economical yet, if enough folks buy it, the price will keep coming down, and we’ll learn how to use it better and more wisely.

Maybe so. What do you think?



Why you should buy a hire car – Cars #cheap #car #insurance #for #young #drivers


#ex lease cars for sale
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Why you should buy a hire car

They might have a terrible reputation, but ex-rental cars are some of the best on the second-hand market

Julie Sinclair Consumer features writer, Telegraph Cars

A s a used car buyer, your instinct probably tells you to steer clear of anything that was once a daily rental. But don’t be too hasty. There’s evidence to suggest that these are now some of the best-kept second-hand cars available.

The reason, it seems, boils down to profit. A decade ago, the rental market was still seen as a dumping ground for cheaper, entry-level cars, which were then handled roughly by inconsiderate drivers. Now, though, manufacturers have realised the potential for using this market as an extended test drive to showcase their latest models, gadgets and engines.

This only works if the cars are kept showroom fresh. Fiat ’s commercial director, Karl Howkins, said: “Rental cars are typically on the road for no more than nine months.”

That makes them “ticking time bombs” for rental companies looking to get the best return for their investment, according to the British Vehicle Rental and Leasing Association. A spokesman said: “When they come off-fleet, they face competition from pre-registered cars and nearly-new demonstrators, so companies have to make sure the vehicles are in mint condition.”

But aren’t rental cars thrashed around by heavy-footed holidaymakers while on fleet? That’s the used car buyers’ biggest worry, but in reality there’s little evidence of extra mechanical wear and tear.

H owkins said: “They may come back with scuffed alloy wheels or minor dings, but clutch replacement is rare.”

Hertz general manager Neil Cunningham said that most of its breakdown and recovery call-outs are due to “lost keys and flat batteries”.

Figures from insurer Accident Exchange seem to back up these statements. It says general bodywork repairs account for more than 60 per cent of its rental car claims.

Fear of red tape and £1,000 policy excesses could well be to thank for people taking better care of rental cars. A spokesman for dealer group Pendragon said: “Rental cars are often in better shape than ones on lease or fleet, as the drivers know they have to pay for any damage.”

Wear and tear is closely monitored by hire firms, too. Cunningham said: “The average Hertz vehicle has oil, water and tyre pressures checked every six days. This is certainly not the case for the average privately owned car.”

The pressure on hire firms to keep their cars in good condition is also driven by buy-back schemes. That’s where the age, condition and mileage of cars as they come off-fleet has all been agreed in advance by the manufacturer, which has fixed a price to buy them back. Fiat says that 95 per cent of its rental stock is dealt with in this way.

These cars end up on franchised dealer forecourts, after more quality checks, as approved used stock. They have covered more miles than the average for a car of their age – usually between 10,000 and 11,000 – but they should be cheaper as a result.

Some ex-rental cars can be found at auction

E x-rentals are also sold through auction houses, while some hire firms sell direct to their customers. Hertz’s Rent2Buy programme offers customers an extended test drive of up to 10 days, after which they can either pay the rental fees, or buy the car and deduct those from the price.

Technically, ex-rentals don’t depreciate any quicker than any other comparable used car, according to car valuation expert CAP Automotive. “We don’t differentiate between an ex-rental and a privately owned car,” CAP’s retail and consumer editor, Philip Nothard, said. “Our value is based on what people are paying for cars based on age, condition and miles on the clock.”

Of course, you may never discover that the car you’re buying is an ex-rental anyway. Despite the industry consensus that this history should no longer carry any stigma, dealers are still reluctant to come clean. Pendragon agreed it would reveal this detail only “if asked”.

Dealers are breaking the law if they knowingly withhold the fact that your car was once a loaner if you ask, however. It’s classed as a misleading omission, because the Office of Fair Trading argues you might not have bought the car had you known.

If you do find out that the car you’re interested in is an ex-rental, though, it certainly shouldn’t put you off. CAP said: “They’re no more risky than any other approved used car.” And the Telegraph’s own used car expert, Honest John, advises: “Ex-rental cars are better run in than cars from single ownership because of the many different driving styles they have been subjected to. Forget your prejudices and don’t worry because there’s no cause to do so.”

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Why the Cars In Japan Look Just Like New. #used #smart #car


#japan cars
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Why the Cars In Japan Look Just Like New

By ANDREW POLLACK,
Published: September 12, 1993

TOKYO, Sept. 11 One of the first things an American motorist might notice about Japan is that the automobiles here all seem so shiny and new, without smashed headlights, dents, rust or even dirt.

The reason is only partly that Japanese fastidiousness extends to the maintenance of cars. Rather, experts say, there really are relatively few old cars in Japan, because of an automobile inspection system that is so onerous and expensive that many people prefer to trade in a perfectly good three- or five-year-old car rather than spend hundreds or even thousands of dollars for the inspection.

The inspection system, critics say, is a case study of the regulations in Japan that benefit businesses at the expense of hard-pressed consumers. It is the type of regulation that Japan’s new Government is promising to relax as part of a major effort to improve living conditions. Consumer Group Complains

“The people who profit from this are maintenance shops and car makers,” said Fumio Matsuda, head of the Japan Automobile Consumers Union.

Japan’s 83,000 garages obtain 44 percent of their roughly $60 billion in annual revenues as a result of mandatory inspections. Automobile companies benefit because people replace their cars frequently.

Inspections are required when a car turns 3 years old, then every 2 years until the car turns 11, then every year. The inspections, which cover more than 100 items from brake function to headlight orientation, are done by a Government test center or by an authorized service station.

Other nations and many states in the United States also require inspections, either of emissions alone or also of the car’s functioning, but Japan also requires car owners to have certain items checked or serviced every 6 months, 12 months or 24 months.

Another big difference is that Japan’s Government asks the owner to have the car repaired before it is inspected, so that it will pass. Faced with this requirement, most owners give their car to the dealer or a service station to prepare it for inspection.

“You take it to the garage and they will just change everything, even if there is nothing wrong with the car,” Kenichi Ohmae, organizer of Heisei Reform, a movement that advocates less Government control over Japan’s economy. said. “If they keep fiddling with the car, there are more problems after the inspection.” Inspection Itself Costs $12

A typical bill for this pre-inspection inspection is $600. The actual inspection at a test center costs only about $12.

Government officials defend the inspection system as necessary to keep traffic flowing. In Japan, where congestion is horrendous and highways often have only two lanes in each direction, a vehicle breakdown is far more disruptive than in the spacious United States, they say.

“Inspection actually contributes to the situation where most of our automobiles run in good condition,” said Takashi Shimodaira, director of the maintenance service division of the Transport Ministry.

He said that only 1 in 2,000 car accidents in Japan were caused by mechanical failure, compared with between 1 in 200 and 1 in 20 in the United States and Europe.

In the United States, 64.1 percent of passenger cars in 1991 were at least five years old. In Japan, only 46.8 percent were. In the United States, 30.5 percent of cars were at least 10 years old, versus 9.6 percent in Japan.

With little demand for used cars, cars here lose their value quickly. “A car more than six years old and in very good condition you can easily see in a junkyard,” said Hiroshige Hanabusa, who makes a living helping people with the administrative chores associated with their cars.

Many of the used cars find their way to other nations, where they are considered bargains. In New Zealand, used Japanese cars are cutting so heavily into sales of new cars that auto dealers and assemblers have complained to the Government. And Russians can’t get enough of old Japanese cars. Taking Cars Home to Moscow

Last year, when a Russian circus returned to Moscow after a tour of Japan, 93 animals, including bears, leopards and parrots, were abandoned on the dock at Yokohama. There was no room for them because the ship was full of used cars bought by the crew.

In June an advisory committee to the Transport Ministry recommended several changes to the inspection system to be carried out in the next two years.

The periodic 6-month checks would be abolished and the number of items in the 12 and 24-month checks would be reduced. Cars more than 11 years old would need inspection every 2 years, instead of every year. And consumers would have the option of going for their inspection first and then doing the maintenance found to be necessary.

Even without the committee’s plan, things are changing. The recession is causing Japanese consumers to hold on to cars longer. And a growing number of people, though still only 1 percent of the car owners, are doing the pre-inspection inspections themselves rather than take their car to a garage.

“I started checking the items one month ago, so I did it gradually,” said Toyokazu Yamada, who had just run his Toyota pickup through the Government testing center in Tokyo.

The inspection showed his brakes to be a little loose, and he was told to have them repaired and come back. He left, drove around, came back and entered a different lane. This time, he passed.



Coffee Connexion Vodacom World – contact details #vodaworld,vodacom,vodacom #world, #midrand,cellular, #shopping,about, #about #vodacom #world, #why #visit #vodacom #world


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Vodacom World

The only cellular mall of its kind in the world.

  • Centrally situated in Midrand, Johannesburg, the mall is considered Vodacom’s flagship
  • Offers a truly unique experience for discerning shoppers and technology fans
  • Plenty of choice; houses SA’s best cellphone and technology manufacturers plus different service providers
  • Our knowledgeable consultants will assess your needs and provide helpful solutions

This month’s deals

Browse our latest device deals and in-store promotions

Terms and conditions apply

LTE compatible devices

Trading hours:

Monday to Friday 9:00 -18:00

Saturday 9:00 -17:00

Sundays Public Holidays 9:00 -14:00

Why should I visit Vodacom World?

  • Come experience a showcase of the latest and greatest technology
  • Sign up for a Vodacom contract or upgrade to a newer device
  • Get your Vodacom cellphone or tablet repaired
  • Make account enquiries and get support
  • Get your cellphone, tablet or laptop set up at one of our tech zones
  • Browse the latest available deals
  • Buy Prepaid airtime and data bundles
  • Buy household or office appliances from specialist stores
  • Host parties, corporate events or stage shows at our 5-star graded event venue

Vodacom World Stores

Store name

Contact details

Tel: 011 653 6530

Tel: 011 653 6800

Tel. 011 653 6510

Tel: 010 0031033

Tel: 011 653 6550

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Tel: 011 653 6740

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Vodacom Customer Care and Repairs

Please visit us in store

Tel: 011 653 6750

Vodacom World Events

Tel: 011 653 6580

Tel: 011 653 6527

5 Star Pro Fitment Centre

Tel: 011 653 6790

Site links

Vodacom South Africa

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    Why Women Pay Lower Insurance Premiums and How to Get Lower Rates for Male Drivers. #compare #car #rental


    #womens car insurance
    #

    Why Women Pay Lower Insurance Premiums and How to Get Lower Rates for Male Drivers

    It is a well-known fact that men pay higher car insurance rates than women. However, what is not so well known is the reasons why men pay higher car insurance rates. Many people tend to believe it is simply because men usually drive much faster than women that there is such disparity in the rates. While this is true to a certain degree, there are other reasons as well.

    Get Free Car Insurance Quotes

    Why Men Pay More than Women

    Many statistics show that men and women have about an equal number of car accidents every year; however, the types of accidents vary considerably. While women tend to be involved in many minor traffic accidents, men seem to be doing a much better job of causing a great deal of damage to vehicles. This is because men are usually much more aggressive drivers and drive at much higher rates of speed. So, because insurance companies pay out much smaller claims for the minor dings that are often associated with many women s fender benders, men suffer higher insurance premiums because of crash damage that tends to cost a lot more to repair

    Typically, women are quoted up to up to 20 percent less than men for their women car insurance quotes. Women receive a female insurance discount. Is there anything men can do to get these lower quotes?

    Working the Odds

    A car insurance company is a business. And, like all businesses, they will invest more in something if it comes with fewer risks, and invest less in something that comes with higher risks. Because car insurance companies are investing in drivers, the more likely it is that a driver will get into an accident and thus, cost the insurance company money, the less likely it is that the insurance company will give that driver a low rate on their insurance. These risks are calculated by working the odds. Men, on average, get into more accidents than women. Men between the ages of 16 and 25 get into more accidents than any other demographic. Therefore, their rates are the higher.

    Get Free Car Insurance Quotes

    Picking Your Ride

    On average, men buy higher end sports cars than women. These cars are more expensive to insure. Also, there is a stereotype that someone who purchases a fast car will engage in risky behavior, like speeding, racing and showboating. Women tend to buy more practical cars with more safety features. Also, some insurance companies will automatically charge more to insure a red car, because red is perceived to be flashy and thus, may indicate a riskier driver.

    Saying I Do Leads to Lower Rate

    This lower cost is because married men have been shown to drive more defensively and get into fewer accidents than single men. Married men also buy fewer sports cars than single men; once they are married, they are more likely to buy family cars with more safety features.

    Be a Good Driver

    Men can always improve their insurance rates by having a clean driving record. By driving at or under the speed limit and always parking legally, men will decrease or eliminate their traffic violations. Fewer traffic violations leads to lower insurance rates. Also, driving defensively and taking as few risks as possible will lead to fewer car accidents. Fewer car accidents also leads to lower insurance rates.

    The best way for men to start receiving better rates on their auto insurance is to become better drivers and buy more sensible cars. This will not only improve their insurance rates, but will make the roads safer for everyone.



    Why Women Pay Lower Insurance Premiums and How to Get Lower Rates for Male Drivers. #car #radiator


    #womens car insurance
    #

    Why Women Pay Lower Insurance Premiums and How to Get Lower Rates for Male Drivers

    It is a well-known fact that men pay higher car insurance rates than women. However, what is not so well known is the reasons why men pay higher car insurance rates. Many people tend to believe it is simply because men usually drive much faster than women that there is such disparity in the rates. While this is true to a certain degree, there are other reasons as well.

    Get Free Car Insurance Quotes

    Why Men Pay More than Women

    Many statistics show that men and women have about an equal number of car accidents every year; however, the types of accidents vary considerably. While women tend to be involved in many minor traffic accidents, men seem to be doing a much better job of causing a great deal of damage to vehicles. This is because men are usually much more aggressive drivers and drive at much higher rates of speed. So, because insurance companies pay out much smaller claims for the minor dings that are often associated with many women s fender benders, men suffer higher insurance premiums because of crash damage that tends to cost a lot more to repair

    Typically, women are quoted up to up to 20 percent less than men for their women car insurance quotes. Women receive a female insurance discount. Is there anything men can do to get these lower quotes?

    Working the Odds

    A car insurance company is a business. And, like all businesses, they will invest more in something if it comes with fewer risks, and invest less in something that comes with higher risks. Because car insurance companies are investing in drivers, the more likely it is that a driver will get into an accident and thus, cost the insurance company money, the less likely it is that the insurance company will give that driver a low rate on their insurance. These risks are calculated by working the odds. Men, on average, get into more accidents than women. Men between the ages of 16 and 25 get into more accidents than any other demographic. Therefore, their rates are the higher.

    Get Free Car Insurance Quotes

    Picking Your Ride

    On average, men buy higher end sports cars than women. These cars are more expensive to insure. Also, there is a stereotype that someone who purchases a fast car will engage in risky behavior, like speeding, racing and showboating. Women tend to buy more practical cars with more safety features. Also, some insurance companies will automatically charge more to insure a red car, because red is perceived to be flashy and thus, may indicate a riskier driver.

    Saying I Do Leads to Lower Rate

    This lower cost is because married men have been shown to drive more defensively and get into fewer accidents than single men. Married men also buy fewer sports cars than single men; once they are married, they are more likely to buy family cars with more safety features.

    Be a Good Driver

    Men can always improve their insurance rates by having a clean driving record. By driving at or under the speed limit and always parking legally, men will decrease or eliminate their traffic violations. Fewer traffic violations leads to lower insurance rates. Also, driving defensively and taking as few risks as possible will lead to fewer car accidents. Fewer car accidents also leads to lower insurance rates.

    The best way for men to start receiving better rates on their auto insurance is to become better drivers and buy more sensible cars. This will not only improve their insurance rates, but will make the roads safer for everyone.



    Most Car Dealers Are Lousy At Selling Electric Cars: Here s Why #used #car #loans


    #cars dealers
    #

    Most Car Dealers Are Lousy At Selling Electric Cars: Here’s Why

    5,508 views Nov 30, 2015

    George Matick Chevrolet, Redford, Michigan

    From carmakers and politicians to enthusiastic owners, there are many groups pushing for greater electric-car adoption.

    But more often that not, the dealers that actually sell the majority of electric cars aren’t so interested.

    Over the past few years, buyers have grumbled about the experience at traditional dealers that sell electric cars alongside internal-combustion models–and salespeople have complained about selling plug-ins.

    This does not apply to Tesla Motors, which sells cars solely through company-owned stores.

    But buyers of other electric cars still face a tough time at dealers. according to a recent report in The New York Times .

    One problem is that dealers apparently don’t think consumers are interested in electric cars.

    Money and car keys

    In a speech this year, Forrest McConnell–former chairman of the National Automobile Dealers Association (NADA) lobbying group–said that only 14 percent of buyers cited fuel efficiency as the most important factor in buying a new car.

    But it’s also possible that dealers are worried that electric cars will negatively affect their bottom lines, for a few reasons.

    Electric cars take longer to sell, because buyers are often unfamiliar with the technology.

    Calculating tax credits and applying other incentives also adds to the amount of time required to complete a single sale.

    That makes electric cars unattractive to salespeople, who make money based on the number of cars they sell.

    Taking the extra time to sell electric cars is proving hard for them to justify.

    Tesla Store Los Angeles [photo: Misha Bruk / MBH Architects]

    It also means salespeople may not be taking the necessary time to educate themselves about electric cars.

    The New York Times report included stories–relayed by buyers–of salespeople unsure of a given model’s range, or pushing oil changes that plug-ins do not need.

    Electric cars also require less regular maintenance, cutting into a major profit area for dealers.

    The NADA says on average, dealers make three times as much profit from service as they do from new-car sales.

    But a 2013 J.D. Power survey found that while 57 percent of gasoline-car buyers planned to take their vehicles back to the dealer for service, that was only the case for 48 percent of electric-car buyers.

    As long as dealers feel they have nothing to gain from selling more electric cars, they will likely remain a major bottleneck to greater adoption.

    Because if the person selling the car isn’t enthusiastic about it, how far should a customer be expected to compensate for that lack of interest?

    _______________________________________________



    Why car title loans are a bad idea. #new #used #cars


    #car title loans
    #

    Why car title loans are a bad idea

    (AOL Autos ) — Cash advances are not a new concept in America’s brand of capitalism. Many people have seen the commercials with some guy barking out, Bad credit, no credit, no problem! Or, Don’t worry about credit, I own the bank!

    In addition to high interest, these car title loans usually include a number of fees that add up quickly.

    Anytime some guy is telling you he owns the bank, run.

    Even though these lenders have been around for a while, signing your car over for a high-interest loan has become a serious financial issue.

    For those of you who are unfamiliar with the concept of car title loans, allow us to explain.

    At times, the best of us get strapped for cash; we may have no credit or bad credit (just like they say in the commercials), which keeps us from getting small loans from a bank or some other more traditional means.

    A title loan offers you cash from the lender, in return you sign over the title of your paid-for car to secure the loan. Typically, these loans are due back in full 30 days later. There’s no credit check and only minimal income verification.

    It sounds pretty straightforward, but borrowing from these places can lead to a repossession of your car and a whole lot of financial trouble.

    Interest rates that make credit card companies blush

    Car title loans have been lumped into the predatory lending category by many consumers. Non-profit organizations such as Consumer Federation of America (CFA) and the Center for Responsible Lending have issued detailed reports outlining some of the title loan issues that the public should be leery about.

    Don’t Miss

    One of the biggest issues with these loans is interest rates. Many people dislike credit card interest rates, which average between the mid to high teens for most Americans. Car title loan interest rates make complaining about credit rates seem ludicrous.

    Car title lenders are in a different category than credit card companies or banks and work around usury laws. Thus, title loan lenders are able to charge triple digit annual percentage rates (APRs). Yes, triple digits. It’s not an exaggeration to see 250% APR and higher on these car tile loans and only a handful of states have passed strict laws that prohibit exorbitant percentage rates.

    Even if your credit card company is charging you a high interest of 25% APR, it’s nothing compared to car title loans. AOL Autos: Most popular used cars

    By federal law, title loan lenders have to disclose the interest rates in terms of the annual percentage. If you have to get a title loan, make sure they don’t just give you a quote of the monthly percentage rate, they have to give it to you as an APR. If they are unclear about the rates, which many can be, just know that a monthly rate of 25% is equivalent to a 300% APR.

    Fees and interest only payments

    In addition to high interest, these car title loans usually include a number of fees that add up quickly. These include processing fees, document fees, late fees, origination fees and lien fees. AOL Autos: Safest cars

    Sometimes there is also a roadside assistance program that borrowers can purchase for another small fee. Some lenders have even gone so far as to make the roadside assistance mandatory. The cost of all these fees can be anywhere from $80 to $115, even for a $500 loan.

    Most of these fees are legal, except one that lenders sometimes charge, the repossession fee. Lenders are not allowed to charge you to repossess your vehicle, but some still do. AOL Autos: Top minivans

    As if high interest rates and a mountain of fees weren’t enough, lenders also give borrowers the option of interest-only payments for a set period of time. In these cases, the loans are usually set up for a longer period of time (compared to the typical 30 days) and the borrower can pay the interest only on the loan.

    These types of payments are called balloon payments where the borrower pays the interest of the loan each month and at the end of the term they still owe the full amount of the loan.

    The CFA reported that one woman paid $400 a month for seven months on an interest-only payment term for a $3,000 loan. After paying $2,800 in interest, she still owed the original $3,000 in the eighth month. AOL Autos: Most popular crossover vehicles

    Rolling over and repossession

    If you think most of the people who take out these loans pay them back in full after one month, think again. Because of the high interest and the fact that these lenders cater to low-income borrowers, many people aren’t able to pay back their loans in the 30-day period. This is called rolling over the loan.

    The terms of these loans are crafted to keep borrowers in a cycle of debt and bring customers either to the verge of repossession or to actual repossession. Not being able pay off the initial loan and then renewing it the next month costs borrowers even more money in interest, on top of the original amount they’ve already borrowed. AOL Autos: Used luxury cars

    Let’s talk about repossession for minute. The CFA reported that, of the people they interviewed in their 2004 study, 75% had to give the title loan lenders a copy of their car keys. Some companies started the cars to see if they worked and took pictures of the vehicle even before a customer filled out the loan application.

    A company based in Arizona said they have GPS systems installed on the cars so they can track the cars and shut them off remotely if they don’t receive payment on time. That may be an extreme case, but these lenders take a customer’s promissory signature very seriously. If you can’t pay, they will come looking for you and your car.

    The concerns for having your car repossessed are obvious. How do you get to work, drop off the kids at school, pick up groceries or go out on the weekends without a car? As if those scenarios weren’t bad enough, owning a car can be some people’s biggest financial asset. If the car is taken away, so goes the money it was worth.

    Some states have laws that force the lenders to pay you the difference of the loan once a lender has repossessed and sold your car, but some don’t. It is possible to default on the loan and not get any money back for your car, even if you only borrowed a few hundred dollars.

    This occurs because car title loans are also over-secured. Typically, the maximum amount most lenders will give you is 25 to 50 percent of what your car is actually worth. However, if you can’t pay back the loan they may be able to sell your car and keep 100% of the profit. Some lenders won’t take possession of a vehicle but instead take the customer to court for the money. They then tack on court costs and finance charges on top of the existing loan amount.

    Alternatives

    Many car title loan lenders defend their business practices by saying they offer loans to people who would otherwise not be able to gain financial assistance. Although this may be partly true, signing over one of your most valuable assets for several hundred dollars is not the only option.

    Some credit unions, like in North Carolina, have begun providing loans that have low interest rates of about 12% APR, a fixed 31-day repayment plan (to keep from rolling over a loan) and set up direct deposit out of the borrower’s paycheck so that loans will be paid off in full.

    Other options may be paycheck cash advances from your employer, cash advances on credit cards, emergency community assistance, small consumer loans, or borrowing from friends or family.

    If you find yourself contemplating a car title loan, check out these alternative options and read the information for yourself at www.responsiblelending.org or www.consumerfed.org. If you still need to sign over your car for cash, educate yourself on the decision and know the possible repercussions of these types of loans.

    E-mail to a friend



    Why Ontario drivers pay the highest car insurance rates in the country – The Globe and Mail #vintage #cars


    #car insurance ontario
    #

    Why Ontario drivers pay the highest car insurance rates in the country Add to.

    Nick Dasko bought his first car when he was 22 – a seven-year-old Mazda Protege that cost him $10,000. Then came the insurance bill: more than $6,000, even though he had no tickets or at-fault accidents.

    Some of his friends were paying even more – $10,000 was not unheard of.

    Auto insurance is the wild west of compulsory services. If you want to drive, you have no choice but to buy it – but what you pay varies wildly. According to quotes obtained Tuesday from kanetix.ca, a 20-year-old male in Winnipeg with a clean driving record would pay $1,396 driving a 2008 Honda Civic DX two-door coupe for pleasure (not to commute to school or work) and compiling 15,000 km/year. In Calgary, that same driver would pay between $2,973 and  $3,789. In Toronto, the bill would range from $4,239 to $9,270  – an increase of 664 per cent.

    The obvious question – why?

    While it costs more to cover claims in Ontario (the province is plagued by insurance fraud) private insurers claim that the actuarial evidence used to rate drivers shows that males under 25 have the worst statistical record as a group. Consequently, individuals in the 16-to-24 group pay more, even if they’ve never been involved in an accident or received a ticket for a traffic violation. Essentially, young men are deemed guilty until proven innocent – at age 25.

    “You are being prejudged,” says Dasko. “It’s the last legal form of discrimination.”

    Public auto insurance programs, such as those in Manitoba and Saskatchewan, take a different approach. Standard rates apply to every driver, regardless of age or gender. Auto insurance is much less expensive for a 20-year-old full-time student in Winnipeg driving the same car as his counterparts in Toronto, Montreal and Calgary.

    The private insurance industry defends the actuarial approach. “It’s not discriminatory,” says Pete Karageorgos, manager of consumer and industry relations for the Insurance Bureau of Canada. “It’s based purely on statistical analysis. It’s like charging more for house insurance in a high-risk neighbourhood. I think people have accepted this. In a public auto insurance system, young drivers are subsidized. In Ontario, young drivers pay rates that reflect their actual risk.”

    Statistics show that young drivers do cause a disproportionate amount of damage. Drivers aged 16 to 24 represent 13 per cent of the driving population, but account for 24 per cent of fatalities and 26 per cent of serious injuries. The question is whether Ontario’s steep insurance charges for young drivers accurately reflect actuarial data.

    State Farm Insurance spokesman John Bordignon says Toronto is a “special case”: “It’s got the highest population density, the worst roads, and a high rate of theft. The costs reflect those risks.”

    Contrary to the public system, in Ontario, Alberta and other provinces, every driver must help bear layers of extra costs. Ontario’s industry is made up of more than 100 private companies that are overseen by a government agency called the Financial Services Commission of Ontario. Revenue comes from two sources – insurance premiums, and the money insurers make by investing the money consumers give them.

    Private insurers say that their system has the built-in advantage of competition: “If you’re not satisfied with your insurer, you can go shop around,” says Karageorgos. “With government insurance, there’s no choice. Private insurance gives you better service.”

    Not everyone agrees. The Consumers Association of Canada (CAC) deems private auto insurance to be one of the biggest rip-offs that Canadians face. After studying the industry for years, CAC concluded that a properly run public insurance system was the best choice, but found itself locked into a debilitating public relations battle with the private industry.

    “There are some things that should be run by private industry,” says CAC president Bruce Cran. “And there are others that should be in the hands of government. Auto insurance is one of them.”

    Cran says that excessive insurance charges affect everyone, not just drivers: “The costs run through the entire economy,” he says. “Everything you buy, every last piece of bread you eat, is carried in a vehicle that has to be insured. So we all pay, whether we have a car or not.”

    The CAC’s investigation of the insurance industry yielded interesting insights into the way it operates, and why costs are so high. In 2004, for example, CAC learned that private insurers had paid $290-million in secret commissions to insurance brokers who steered business their way. This practice had a direct impact on consumers – instead of hunting for the best price for their customers, brokers sold the policy that offered them the highest commission.

    A public auto insurance system can offer fundamental business advantages. Most important, a public system reduces overhead costs – instead of multiple companies, each with its own head office, computer systems, etc. there is just one, which cuts duplication and creates efficiencies of scale.

    Other significant savings include profit margin (public insurance systems don’t have to pay dividends to shareholders) and advertising – public systems don’t have to budget for TV spots and a talking gecko. Public insurance plans can also control costs more effectively – body shops, medical clinics and towing companies must comply with rates set by the public plan, which wields monopoly power over suppliers. Ontario’s private insurers, on the other hand, face ongoing problems with gouging and fraud.

    As with U.S. health care, the debate over private and public auto insurance has been cast along ideological lines that obscure underlying economic realities. Ontario’s private insurance firms admit that rates here are the highest, yet insist that theirs is the superior business model.

    CROSS-CANADA PREMIUM QUOTES

    Using the website kanetix.ca on Tuesday, we obtained quotes for a 20-year-old full-time male student, in the 16-to-24 age group. We listed him as principal driver, clean record, living at home, using a 2008 Honda Civic DX two-door coupe for pleasure (not to commute to school or work) and compiling 15,000 km/year. Deductible was $500 for collision and comprehensive, with $1-million liability. The site harvests quotes from different companies, but those companies do not necessarily quote for all cities; the Canadian Automobile Association does not sell service in Montreal. The Manitoba rate was obtained directly from a dedicated website. *Kanetix provides a “lowest rate” but does not identify it until the consumer calls for a quote.



    Why you can t find a good used car at the right price #car


    #find a used car
    #

    Why you can’t find a good used car at the right price

    If you’re looking for a deal on a late-model used car, keep looking. Thanks to the continued slowdown in sales and leases of new cars (which become used the minute they’re driven off of the showroom floor), the fact that people are holding onto their cars longer, and ongoing demand from value-conscious buyers who don’t want to buy new, good used cars are going for higher prices than ever — if you can even find one.

    In an announcement Thursday, national dealer network Carmax said it was selling fewer used cars, and is having trouble getting them at a decent price. Average selling prices continued to climb, as the tight supply of late-model used vehicles increased our acquisition costs compared with the prior year, the company said in a statement.

    Despite higher prices, late-model used cars are still a good deal, according to Consumer Reports’ auto experts:

    Late-model vehicles are still among the best values you’ll find. They usually have many years of life left in them and often have advanced safety features. And they’ve already taken their biggest hit in depreciation. A new car loses about 64 percent of its value in the first five years, but a three-year-old car, for example, will lose only about 32 percent in the next five years.

    To avoid paying extra, Consumer Reports suggests not going for certified vehicles: Buying a certified car is like buying insurance in case something happens, and we’ve found you often pay more for the warranty than you would for any needed repairs. Instead, buy a reliable used car and pocket the money you’d spend on the certification.”



    Why Used-Car Prices Will Stay High #cars #for #sale #uk


    #used cars values
    #

    Why Used-Car Prices Will Stay High

    By Kelsey Mays

    May 23, 2012

    Mike Hogan didn’t expect much for his trade-in, a 13-year-old stick-shift Subaru Forester SUV with 129,000 miles on the odometer. He’d have been happy with $1,500.

    The dealer offered $2,750.

    “I suppose I undervalue my used cars because I drive them for so long,” said Hogan, a 49-year-old who is the director of a domestic violence program in suburban Milwaukee. He handed over the Forester, his wife’s car, last January and bought her a brand-new Kia Soul, a car that starts at $13,900 and is one of the cheapest on the market. It was the first new car Hogan bought in more than a dozen years.

    “We are both long-time used-car buyers,” Hogan wrote in an email. “We most often try to purchase low-mileage used cars that are only one or two model years old. … Given the inflated prices at the time, we did not consider seriously any used models.”

    Believe it or not, the dealer will likely still make money. Cars.com’s national inventory shows dozens of 1999 Subaru Foresters with more than 100,000 miles, and the median listing price is just shy of $5,000.

    Three years of depressed new-car sales have driven used prices to historic highs. Recent evidence suggests possible relief, but it will likely take years, not months, before used-car prices come back down.

    Low Sales, Fewer Cars

    Such is the result of new-car sales below 16 million, which is what we’ve seen every year since 2008, when the economy crumbled. From 2008 to 2011, recession-wracked car shoppers bought more than 19 million fewer vehicles than during the earlier 2000s. That, in turn, affected the number of used cars on the road today, available to used-car shoppers like Hogan.

    New-car sales handily outpaced the number of cars being scrapped by at least 3 million from 2000 to 2007, according to CNW Marketing Research:

    *Projected

    Sources: Automotive News, CNW Marketing Research, Bloomberg News

    The total number of vehicles on the road ballooned over that period. In 2000, the U.S. had some 205 million cars on the road, or 73 cars per 100 Americans, according Polk and census data. By 2007, that number had grown to 241 million cars, or 80 cars for every 100 Americans.

    Then came the recession. From 2008 to 2011, Americans bought just 48 million new cars, while junkyards scrapped around 47 million used cars. Predictably, total cars on the road plateaued at around 240 million. The number of Americans driving them continued to grow, however. In 2007 there were 80 cars for every 100 Americans. By 2011, that number had ebbed to 77.

    Fewer cars in circulation drove up used-car prices, particularly as drivers hung onto their vehicles longer and longer. A collapse in auto leasing in 2008 exacerbated the situation, leaving the pipeline dry for late-model used cars in 2011 through today — the types of cars Hogan and many others typically zero in on when car shopping.

    The result? The average used car went from $9,022 at wholesale in December 2008 to $9,878 three years later, according to Automotive News and ADESA data.

    The numbers hit home when you consider Cars.com data for some of the most popular car searches. Look at the Ford F-150, Ford Mustang, Honda Civic, Jeep Grand Cherokee and Toyota Camry. Across the five models, listed prices for used cars 5 years old or newer have increased 29% since April 2009, easily outpacing the relative increase in MSRPs across the same span.

    Source: Cars.com data. Each average included used-car listings on 5-year-old and newer cars each April. (For example, April 2009 had 2004-2008 models.)

    A Slow Road Back

    What needs to happen for the high prices to reverse? Exactly what is happening in 2012 — just more of it over more time. New-car sales are up 10% through the first four months of the year, and analysts surveyed this month by Bloomberg News expect shoppers this year to buy 14.3 million new cars, a 12% gain by year’s end. CNW projects around 12 million cars to be scrapped this year, which signals that the total number of cars on the road will climb once again.

    Used-car demand has been falling in the meantime, but could that be due to shoppers making the same choice Hogan did? In 2010, shoppers bought 3.2 used cars for every new car, according to CNW. In 2011, that ratio fell to 3.0. The ratio has seasonal variations, but shoppers through April bought 2.3 used cars for every new car — down from 2.4 cars in the first four months of 2011. Any way you slice it, the relative demand for used cars is falling.

    That, combined with a slow but steady influx of used cars, means prices will fall. slowly. Average wholesale used-car prices fell 2% year over year in February, which is the most recent data available from Automotive News. Auto Remarketing, a used-car publication, noted that auto leasing has stabilized — around one in five cars — since early spring 2011.

    The relief will be slow. The bulk of 2011’s leases won’t turn over until 2014 and beyond. February’s average wholesale price for a used car is just $31 less than last December’s.

    The progress is slow, but it might work out in time for Hogan’s next car. While his wife drives the Soul, he hopes to get a few more years out of his 2005 Toyota Sienna minivan, which he bought in 2007.

    “I am hoping to get another three or four years out of our Toyota Sienna,” Hogan wrote. “And I expect, by then, you will be able to get good value in low-mileage used cars again.”



    Why Diesel? #car #auctions #ireland


    #diesel cars
    #

    Why Diesel?

    Today’s diesel vehicles are clean, quiet and fun-to-drive, and many consumers are learning diesel is an environmentally conscious option that does not sacrifice power or performance.

    Why Diesel?

    Clean diesel cars, trucks and SUVs typically achieve an impressive 20 to 40 percent improvement in fuel economy and 10 to 20 percent reduction in emissions when compared to a similar gasoline powered vehicles (www.fueleconomy.gov ). Recent advances in emission control technology, combined with the introduction of ultra-low sulfur diesel fuel in 2006 enabled diesel-powered cars and pickup trucks to be certified for sale in all 50 states, generating greater interest in this new generation of clean diesel cars and SUVs. These changes, combined with market success of a limited range of existing diesel products have prompted vehicle manufacturers to consider diesel as a new option for passenger vehicles or to expand the number of diesel offerings available.

    Clean diesel engines eliminated black smoke since 2007 with the introduction of new particulate filters. And because diesels deliver up to 40 percent better real-world fuel economy. national fuel economy standards for cars and light-duty trucks beginning in 2017 are also expected to be met in part by an increasing number of clean diesel passenger vehicle choices. Today’s diesel vehicles are clean, quiet and fun-to-drive, and many consumers are learning diesel is an environmentally conscious option that does not sacrifice power or performance. Clean diesel technology in today’s properly maintained vehicles emits near zero levels of emissions. Exhaust from new clean diesel trucks is so clean it passes the “white handkerchief test.” If you hold a handkerchief next to the tailpipe and rev the engine, it stays white – picking up no smell or black soot. That’s why we call it #cleandiesel.

    Clean diesel is not a “bridge” concept or “down-the-road” expectation – these vehicles are on the road right now providing impressive hybrid-like mileage and meeting the same emissions standards as gasoline vehicles. Just as important is the fact that automakers are introducing more diesel-powered models every year and consumers are warming up to the efficiency and unique characteristics of the powertrain. In fact, many drivers report fuel economy benefits that consistently rival a hybrid, and exceed EPA window stickers posted mileage. These vehicles are clean with low CO2 emissions, they provide great performance, they are renewable fuel-ready and most important – they are available to the American public right now.

    While diesel passenger vehicles currently make up a modest 2.88 percent of the entire U.S. vehicle market, Diesel Technology Forum has collected consensus forecasts from auto and market analysts who predict that diesel cars, pickups and SUVs will comprise about seven percent of the market by 2020 or just over one million diesel-powered cars and trucks on the road, saving almost eight million tons of carbon emissions and about 24 million barrels of crude oil.

    Auto analysts and other comparative studies have also determined a significant savings that diesel owners experience compared to gas vehicle owners based on fuel costs, resale value and operating costs. Diesel vehicles saved owners as much as $2,000 to $6,000 in Total Cost of Ownership (TCO) during a three to five year period when compared to similar gasoline vehicles.

    Biofuel Compatible

    Diesel technology’s future value is further enhanced by its suitability for hybrid applications and its readiness to use a diverse range of first and second generation renewable and biodiesel fuels making diesel a clean and sustainable choice.

    Diesel engines were originally invented to run on vegetable oils. Today, most diesel engines can run on high-quality blends of biodiesel with little modification as well as next-generation, drop-in renewable diesel fuels which offer even further benefits. This flexibility of the diesel platform can accelerate the introduction of these renewable diesel fuels across the economy.

    Diesel drivers have the option to fill up with blends of biodiesel at the pump. Most new and existing diesel vehicles and equipment are compatible with lower level biodiesel or renewable diesel fuel blends, between five percent and 20 percent depending on manufacturer warranties.

    When powered with a blend of five percent biodiesel, or B5, the anticipated growth in the light-duty car fleet will save a further 200 million gallons of gasoline and reduce CO2 emissions by a further 150,000 tonnes by 2023.

    Top 10 States of Diesel Drivers in 2014 – Total Diesel Passenger Vehicles

    Top 10 States of Diesel Drivers in 2014 – Highest Percentage of Diesel Passenger Vehicles


    Free-Trade Cars: Why a U. S. Europe Free-Trade Agreement Is a Good Idea – Feature – Car and Driver #car #ratings #and #reviews


    #trade cars
    #

    The United States and the European Union consider a free-trade agreement. Finally.

    cheaper cars, dirt-cheaper trucks

    The standard tariff for importing cars to the U.S. is 2.5 percent of their value. For pickup trucks and commercial vans, the tariff is a whopping 25 percent. Individual European countries don t charge import duties, but the European Union charges a flat rate of 10 percent on imported automobiles. In simple terms, tariffs are taxes. They re paid to governments by the businesses that import and export products and are factored into the prices we pay. Virtually every country in the world charges tariffs to some degree. With the proposed TTIP in place, the tariffs on cars and about a billion other products exchanged across the Atlantic would almost definitely disappear.

    revitalizing manufacturing

    ‘merica

    Suffice it to say, automakers are eager to see the TTIP enacted. The American Automotive Policy Council. which represents Chrysler, Ford, and GM, issued a statement supporting the negotiations, calling for an ambitious agreement to eliminate tariffs. Unlike NAFTA. the 1994 free-trade agreement that resulted in a rush of factory relocations to Mexico, the European-U.S. deal could very well establish the United States as a major exporter.

    A senior Volkswagen executive tells us that when Silao, Mexico, recently won out over the U.S. as the site of a new engine factory, it wasn t because of the cheaper labor. It s [Mexico s] free-trade agreement with the E.U.



    Why used-car prices are rising so much #used #dealerships


    #value used car
    #

    Why used-car prices are rising so much

    On Tuesday I wrote about how a shortage of homes for sale in many areas, combined with an uptick in demand, is pushing prices upward. Something similar is happening in the used-car market.

    A shortage of used cars – combined with higher demand from buyers who have lost a job, wrecked their credit scores or just become more frugal – has narrowed the gap between new- and used-car prices.

    Since 2007, the average trade-in value of a 6-year-old car has escalated much more rapidly in percentage terms – and almost as much in dollar terms – compared with a new car.

    The used car has risen by $2,124, or 33 percent, to $8,495. The new car has risen $2,434, or 9 percent, to $30,545, according to Edmunds. com.

    Some late-model used cars that hold their residual value cost almost as much as a new version, especially if you factor in year-end incentives on new cars.

    Auto experts say the run-up in used-car prices is abating, making this a good time to trade in a late-model used car (up to five years) for a 2012 vehicle.

    “In terms of getting the best deal for a used car, right now is a good time,” says Jeff Piol. pricing manager with Edmunds.

    Normally the magazine recommends buying a 2- to 3-year-old car because you miss paying for the years when a car depreciates fastest and still get a reliable car with the newest technology and safety features. “That pool of cars has dramatically shrunk,” Bartlett says, making new cars a better option in some cases.

    In a recent blog post, Consumer Reports compared buying a 2012 car with a 2010 model (with 28,000 miles) and a 2008 (with 47,000 miles) for five popular vehicles. It assumed the buyer put 10 percent down and took out a five-year loan at 3.365 percent for the new car and 3.31 percent for used.

    It found that a 2012 Honda Pilot would cost $531 a month compared with $496 for the 2010 version. For an extra $35 a month, the buyer could get a new car with zero miles and a full 3-year, 36,000 mile warranty, it said, concluding the new car was the better buy.

    It deemed the 2008 Pilot a better deal than the 2012 version because the buyer would save $150 per month, which could offset maintenance.

    However, for cars that are being redesigned for 2013 – such as the Ford Fusion and Honda Accord – buying a heavily discounted 2012 model might be better than buying a 2010 or a 2008. Payments on the new cars would be only $90 to $97 more than on the 2008 models. (Full report at sfg.ly/Pvzqt2 .)

    Edmunds found examples where payments on a new car were about the same – and in a few cases, less – than payments on a 1-year-old car or a certified pre-owned car. (See sfg.ly/VmdrqK ).

    Reasons for shortage

    What’s driving the used-car shortage?

    During the recession, new-car sales went off a cliff – plunging from 16.1 million in 2008 to 10.4 million in 2009. They started recovering in 2010 and are expected to hit about 14.3 million this year.

    But the steep drop-off in 2008-09 means fewer used cars are coming onto the market. The sales slump included leased vehicles, which typically come back after two to three years. That explains why late-model cars have been in especially short supply.

    Meanwhile, people are also holding onto their vehicles longer. The average age of cars and light trucks on the road was 10.8 years in 2011 compared with 9.8 years in 2007 and 8.8 in 1999, according to Polk, an automotive research and marketing firm.

    Patrick Nohr. an independent used-car dealer in Walnut Creek who also brokers new cars, says the supply of used cars got so tight he started running an ad in a local paper last year asking people to sell him their cars. He’s still running the ad, even though he gets few responses.

    “Good used cars are still hard to come by,” Nohr says. He says he used to buy a lot of late-model lease returns at auction, but prices got so high he can’t make a profit after he reconditions them. He says he is outbid by dealers who can sell them as certified pre-owned, and command a high price.

    He said low-end cars – the kind parents buy for their kids – are also hard to find, in part because of programs in California that paid people to retire older vehicles. “Cars we might have sold for $3,000 to $3,500 a couple years are now $5,000 to $5,500,” he says.

    Mid-range cars are also in demand from people whose credit has been affected by a home or job loss. “They have to buy cars they can pay cash for,” and they might have saved up $7,000 or 8,000.

    Meanwhile, dealers can cut prices on new cars and attempt to make it up “on the back end, with extended warranties and undercoating,” Nohr says.

    Trade-in values

    Linda Goldberg, a car buying expert with CarQ who represents buyers, says consumers who trade in well maintained cars should expect to get more than the trade-in values published by sources such as Edmunds.com, Kbb.com and Nadaguides.com.

    “What I’m seeing in the last few months is dealers offering $1,000 or $2,000 more than the published trade in value. I haven’t seen that happen in a very long time,” she says.

    A better target for sellers would be the private-party value.

    She is working with a client who is trading in a 2010 Audi. For a similarly equipped car, the trade-in value according to Edmunds is $36,505, the private party value is $38,686 and the dealer retail (what a dealer would supposedly sell it for) is $41,023.

    But she has seen dealers advertising this car for $44,681 to $48,990.

    If the client sold it himself, he could expect to get $44,000 or $45,000.

    At a plateau

    Piol says used-car prices seem to have reached a plateau and “will probably soften” as more supply enters the market and more buyers opt for new cars.

    The National Automobile Dealers Association does not expect the supply of late-model used cars (up to 5 years old) to begin increasing until 2014, says Larry Dixon. a senior automotive analyst with the NADA Used Car Guide .

    But he has seen “some softness” in the price of used compact and midsize cars in the past few months. “Consumers have become desensitized to fuel prices and we haven’t seen prices” for small and midsize cars grow like they did a few years go. What’s hot in the used-car market today are sport utility vehicles and pickups.

    With car values depreciating more slowly, consumers find themselves with positive equity – meaning their cars are worth more than they owe – much sooner than in the past, Dixon notes.

    Now if we could just get homeowners in the same position, the economy would be in better shape.

    Consumers hot for used cars

    The price of a used car has escalated more rapidly, in percentage terms, than the price of a new car



    Why you should buy a hire car – Cars #cars #used


    #ex lease cars for sale
    #

    Why you should buy a hire car

    They might have a terrible reputation, but ex-rental cars are some of the best on the second-hand market

    Julie Sinclair Consumer features writer, Telegraph Cars

    A s a used car buyer, your instinct probably tells you to steer clear of anything that was once a daily rental. But don’t be too hasty. There’s evidence to suggest that these are now some of the best-kept second-hand cars available.

    The reason, it seems, boils down to profit. A decade ago, the rental market was still seen as a dumping ground for cheaper, entry-level cars, which were then handled roughly by inconsiderate drivers. Now, though, manufacturers have realised the potential for using this market as an extended test drive to showcase their latest models, gadgets and engines.

    This only works if the cars are kept showroom fresh. Fiat ’s commercial director, Karl Howkins, said: “Rental cars are typically on the road for no more than nine months.”

    That makes them “ticking time bombs” for rental companies looking to get the best return for their investment, according to the British Vehicle Rental and Leasing Association. A spokesman said: “When they come off-fleet, they face competition from pre-registered cars and nearly-new demonstrators, so companies have to make sure the vehicles are in mint condition.”

    But aren’t rental cars thrashed around by heavy-footed holidaymakers while on fleet? That’s the used car buyers’ biggest worry, but in reality there’s little evidence of extra mechanical wear and tear.

    H owkins said: “They may come back with scuffed alloy wheels or minor dings, but clutch replacement is rare.”

    Hertz general manager Neil Cunningham said that most of its breakdown and recovery call-outs are due to “lost keys and flat batteries”.

    Figures from insurer Accident Exchange seem to back up these statements. It says general bodywork repairs account for more than 60 per cent of its rental car claims.

    Fear of red tape and £1,000 policy excesses could well be to thank for people taking better care of rental cars. A spokesman for dealer group Pendragon said: “Rental cars are often in better shape than ones on lease or fleet, as the drivers know they have to pay for any damage.”

    Wear and tear is closely monitored by hire firms, too. Cunningham said: “The average Hertz vehicle has oil, water and tyre pressures checked every six days. This is certainly not the case for the average privately owned car.”

    The pressure on hire firms to keep their cars in good condition is also driven by buy-back schemes. That’s where the age, condition and mileage of cars as they come off-fleet has all been agreed in advance by the manufacturer, which has fixed a price to buy them back. Fiat says that 95 per cent of its rental stock is dealt with in this way.

    These cars end up on franchised dealer forecourts, after more quality checks, as approved used stock. They have covered more miles than the average for a car of their age – usually between 10,000 and 11,000 – but they should be cheaper as a result.

    Some ex-rental cars can be found at auction

    E x-rentals are also sold through auction houses, while some hire firms sell direct to their customers. Hertz’s Rent2Buy programme offers customers an extended test drive of up to 10 days, after which they can either pay the rental fees, or buy the car and deduct those from the price.

    Technically, ex-rentals don’t depreciate any quicker than any other comparable used car, according to car valuation expert CAP Automotive. “We don’t differentiate between an ex-rental and a privately owned car,” CAP’s retail and consumer editor, Philip Nothard, said. “Our value is based on what people are paying for cars based on age, condition and miles on the clock.”

    Of course, you may never discover that the car you’re buying is an ex-rental anyway. Despite the industry consensus that this history should no longer carry any stigma, dealers are still reluctant to come clean. Pendragon agreed it would reveal this detail only “if asked”.

    Dealers are breaking the law if they knowingly withhold the fact that your car was once a loaner if you ask, however. It’s classed as a misleading omission, because the Office of Fair Trading argues you might not have bought the car had you known.

    If you do find out that the car you’re interested in is an ex-rental, though, it certainly shouldn’t put you off. CAP said: “They’re no more risky than any other approved used car.” And the Telegraph’s own used car expert, Honest John, advises: “Ex-rental cars are better run in than cars from single ownership because of the many different driving styles they have been subjected to. Forget your prejudices and don’t worry because there’s no cause to do so.”

    F or all the latest news, advice and reviews from Telegraph Cars, sign up to our weekly newsletter by entering your email here



    Why You Should NOT Buy a New Car – ReadyForZero Blog #hydrogen #cars


    #what car should i buy
    #

    Why You Should NOT Buy a New Car

    17 Oct 2012 by Ben

    Welcome to the 5th  Smart Money Debate at ReadyForZero . To see the other side  of this debate, read Miranda s post: Why You Should Buy a New Car (Not Used). And then let us know which argument was more convincing!

    Buying new things is fun. I love unwrapping the shiny packaging, opening up the box, and smelling the factory made scent of something brand new. There is nothing quite like holding something in your hands that nobody else has ever used. It makes you feel well special.

    You know what makes me feel even more special than buying something brand new? Saving money. That is why almost everything I purchase is used. Don t get me wrong I m not one to purchase a used pair of Hanes. However, with most items, you can find great deals if you are willing to buy used. This is especially true when it comes to major purchases like cars.

    While I wouldn t recommend buying any old lemon, buying used cars is the only thing that makes sense financially. Our family has purchased new before, and we consider it to be one of the biggest financial mistakes we have ever made. Here is why we will never buy a new car again and neither should you!

    Reason #1: New Cars Don t Hold Their Value

    We ve all heard this before, but it bears repeating: a new car begins losing value the minute that you drive it off the lot. How much value you ask? According to Edmunds.com, a new car loses approximately 10% of its value as soon as you drive away. 10%. Furthermore, it loses about 20% of its value after the first year, and 10% off the original purchase price per year after that. Depending on the make and model of your new car, you may have lost up to 80% of the value from the purchase price within 5 years!

    Get offers for lower-interest rate debt consolidation loans here on ReadyForZero!

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    Would you invest $25,000 in the stock market if you knew that you were going to lose $2,500 the moment you completed the transaction? Would you buy a house for $200,000 if you knew for a fact that it would only be worth $180,000 the minute you were handed the key and $160,000 a year later. Of course you wouldn t! No sane person would. Why would you do the same thing with a car? Let somebody take that huge financial hit by buying the new car. Then, you can take advantage of their silliness and buy the car used after they trade it in a few years later.

    Reason #2: Used Cars are Cheaper

    Since new cars are clearly a poor investment, it makes sense that the sticker price for used cars is far less expensive than the newer models. For instance, a brand new 2012 Toyota Prius is currently selling for around $28,500. Earlier this year, we were able to purchase a used 2009 Prius with under 25,000 miles for only $17,500. While red isn t exactly my favorite color, I was happy to suffer through it in order to save $11,000.

    Reason #3: Less Worry

    You know the nervous feeling that you get when you buy something new? You become very protective of it. You don t want anything to spill or scratch it. You re so proud of it that you want it to stay looking all brand new and shiny for forever. That is why you bought the product new in the first place. Afterall, what good is a new car if it doesn t actually look new.

    I hate to tell you this, but eventually everything that is new is going to become blemished. When it does, you may be devastated especially if you spent as much money on it as you would a car. Why not save yourself all of that worry, headache, and stress? Just buy your cars used. A nick, dent, or scratch doesn t seem like such a big deal then.

    Reason #4: Warranties are Available

    People who tell you to buy a new car will tout the great warranties with which new cars come. Guess what. Most used cars will come with a warranty as well. In fact, the most important warranty the manufacturer s powertrain warranty should still be in effect as long as the car has not exceeded its age or mileage limits. This warranty covers all of the big stuff that might break like your engine or transmission. So, the warranty argument doesn t really hold water. If the warranty is in effect, the argument that you are going to have to pay for more repairs to a used car than you would for a new car doesn t really work either.

    Reason #5: A New Car is a Bad Investment

    Have I mentioned that a new car loses 10% of its value the moment you drive it off the lot and 20% of its value over the first year alone. Oh, I did? Good. Well, this is so important that I m mentioning it again. If that new car smell is still tempting you, go back and read Reason #1 to help snap you back into reality. Then, go out and buy a New Car Smell air freshener to put in your used car, and save yourself thousands of dollars.

    As you can see, buying a new car is not the best decision for your finances. While that new car smell may make you feel like you are loaded, buying a new car is just another way of trying to look wealthy. It is a status symbol that savvy spenders can do without. If you re in the market for a new car, do yourself a favor and buy a used one instead.

    No matter what you decide, use ReadyForZero to track your debt payoff it s a free online tool that helps you stay motivated and pay off your debt in the fastest time frame possible.

    To see the other side  of this debate, read Miranda s post: Why You Should Buy a New Car (Not Used). And then let us know which argument was more convincing!

    This post was published by Ben, Content Manager and Writer for » ReadyForZero. ReadyForZero is a company that helps people get out of debt on their own with a simple and free online tool that can automate and track your debt paydown.



    Why Buy Used Cars, Rental Vehicles for Sale – Enterprise Car Sales #cheap #used #car


    #buy used cars
    #

    Why Buy a Used Vehicle

    Consider the Advantages

    Buying a used vehicle can save you money because a new vehicle experiences its greatest loss in value within the first 12 to 18 months. Rather than watching value decrease significantly in just the first year, consider buying a used car or truck. A used rental car can have a lower purchase price with lower monthly payments, and the factory warranties are usually still available. Buying a used vehicle allows you to upgrade to the newer make and model you want and add more optional features.

    Why Throw Money Away on New Car Depreciation?

    Thinking about buying a new vehicle? Think again. According to the experts at Kelley Blue Book . in three years a new vehicle could depreciate by as much as 73 percent of its value. At best it will retain a mere 62 percent of its value after three years. That s one major advantage to buying a used vehicle.

    Car depreciation is the dark cloud hanging over new purchases. While most vehicles depreciate by 15 to 20 percent of their value each year, the first year tends to hurt the most. In fact, the two-minute drive off the lot can cost some owners up to 15 percent of their new vehicle s value.

    If you re a car buyer unwilling to throw away money on vehicle depreciation for that new car smell, consider buying a high-quality, late-model used car. In addition to a lower purchase price, lower registration and license fees, you ll also enjoy lower depreciation, as the previous owner has already absorbed the steepest portion of the used vehicle s depreciation cost. Some popular used models include Civic. Accord. CRV. Camry. Wrangler. Tacoma. Challenger. Mini. Explorer. Escape. Altima and Outback .

    Used Rental Car Value

    Consider the Benefits of Buying a Used Rental Car

    Millions of used rental vehicles (and leased vehicles) are sold annually in the United States. Many were passed directly to auctions and on to used car dealerships. However, tens of thousands were selected by the rental and lease companies for their own car resale businesses. These used vehicles represent the cream of the crop and are often considered some of the best used cars on the market. These used vehicles, while driven by multiple motorists, receive much more care than the average consumer-owned used car and offer the following benefits:

    • Great selection: The typical used car for sale at Enterprise Car Sales is one to two years old. This creates a selection of vehicles that are contemporary, stylish, and sought after.
    • One owner: If offered a used vehicle owned by an auto expert committed to vehicle maintenance and care, the average used car buyer might be tempted to sign sight unseen. Enterprise Car Sales offers this opportunity. Used cars are our business, and our livelihood depends on keeping them expertly maintained.
    • Low mileage: Used rental vehicles or used leased vehicles often have less than 40,000 miles when they are put up for sale.
    • Reasonable prices: All used vehicles sold by Enterprise Car Sales are offered at low prices, and with a no-haggle policy, buyers get a great used car price without the pressure of bargaining.

    Used rental cars provide a tremendous value. Make a smart move and consider buying one the next time you re in the market for a used vehicle.



    Why you should buy a hire car – Cars #family #cars


    #ex lease cars for sale
    #

    Why you should buy a hire car

    They might have a terrible reputation, but ex-rental cars are some of the best on the second-hand market

    Julie Sinclair Consumer features writer, Telegraph Cars

    A s a used car buyer, your instinct probably tells you to steer clear of anything that was once a daily rental. But don’t be too hasty. There’s evidence to suggest that these are now some of the best-kept second-hand cars available.

    The reason, it seems, boils down to profit. A decade ago, the rental market was still seen as a dumping ground for cheaper, entry-level cars, which were then handled roughly by inconsiderate drivers. Now, though, manufacturers have realised the potential for using this market as an extended test drive to showcase their latest models, gadgets and engines.

    This only works if the cars are kept showroom fresh. Fiat ’s commercial director, Karl Howkins, said: “Rental cars are typically on the road for no more than nine months.”

    That makes them “ticking time bombs” for rental companies looking to get the best return for their investment, according to the British Vehicle Rental and Leasing Association. A spokesman said: “When they come off-fleet, they face competition from pre-registered cars and nearly-new demonstrators, so companies have to make sure the vehicles are in mint condition.”

    But aren’t rental cars thrashed around by heavy-footed holidaymakers while on fleet? That’s the used car buyers’ biggest worry, but in reality there’s little evidence of extra mechanical wear and tear.

    H owkins said: “They may come back with scuffed alloy wheels or minor dings, but clutch replacement is rare.”

    Hertz general manager Neil Cunningham said that most of its breakdown and recovery call-outs are due to “lost keys and flat batteries”.

    Figures from insurer Accident Exchange seem to back up these statements. It says general bodywork repairs account for more than 60 per cent of its rental car claims.

    Fear of red tape and £1,000 policy excesses could well be to thank for people taking better care of rental cars. A spokesman for dealer group Pendragon said: “Rental cars are often in better shape than ones on lease or fleet, as the drivers know they have to pay for any damage.”

    Wear and tear is closely monitored by hire firms, too. Cunningham said: “The average Hertz vehicle has oil, water and tyre pressures checked every six days. This is certainly not the case for the average privately owned car.”

    The pressure on hire firms to keep their cars in good condition is also driven by buy-back schemes. That’s where the age, condition and mileage of cars as they come off-fleet has all been agreed in advance by the manufacturer, which has fixed a price to buy them back. Fiat says that 95 per cent of its rental stock is dealt with in this way.

    These cars end up on franchised dealer forecourts, after more quality checks, as approved used stock. They have covered more miles than the average for a car of their age – usually between 10,000 and 11,000 – but they should be cheaper as a result.

    Some ex-rental cars can be found at auction

    E x-rentals are also sold through auction houses, while some hire firms sell direct to their customers. Hertz’s Rent2Buy programme offers customers an extended test drive of up to 10 days, after which they can either pay the rental fees, or buy the car and deduct those from the price.

    Technically, ex-rentals don’t depreciate any quicker than any other comparable used car, according to car valuation expert CAP Automotive. “We don’t differentiate between an ex-rental and a privately owned car,” CAP’s retail and consumer editor, Philip Nothard, said. “Our value is based on what people are paying for cars based on age, condition and miles on the clock.”

    Of course, you may never discover that the car you’re buying is an ex-rental anyway. Despite the industry consensus that this history should no longer carry any stigma, dealers are still reluctant to come clean. Pendragon agreed it would reveal this detail only “if asked”.

    Dealers are breaking the law if they knowingly withhold the fact that your car was once a loaner if you ask, however. It’s classed as a misleading omission, because the Office of Fair Trading argues you might not have bought the car had you known.

    If you do find out that the car you’re interested in is an ex-rental, though, it certainly shouldn’t put you off. CAP said: “They’re no more risky than any other approved used car.” And the Telegraph’s own used car expert, Honest John, advises: “Ex-rental cars are better run in than cars from single ownership because of the many different driving styles they have been subjected to. Forget your prejudices and don’t worry because there’s no cause to do so.”

    F or all the latest news, advice and reviews from Telegraph Cars, sign up to our weekly newsletter by entering your email here



    Suzuki Ends U. S. Car Sales: Why It Had to Do It (And Other Brands That Could Disappear) #student #car #insurance


    #suzuki cars
    #

    Suzuki Ends U.S. Car Sales: Why It Had to Do It (And Other Brands That Could Disappear)

    We re in the midst of an automotive reckoning. Suzuki s announcement this week that it will no longer be selling cars in the U.S. makes it the 10th major brand to disappear since the start of the century. Of those, one was a Ford brand, one was a division of Chrysler, and the remaining eight all were either subsidiaries of or close partners with General Motors. (Many we recapped in our Decade in Review .) Like Isuzu, another U.S. evacuee and estranged GM ally, Suzuki will continue selling cars outside the U.S. Why did Suzuki, Japan s fourth-largest car company, leave? And why does this keep happening?

    A multi-dimensional look at Suzuki s U.S. sales

    The Short Answer

    The tl;dr explanation—that s too long; didn t read in internet-ese—is that even though Suzuki has two models that really are quite good, Suzuki isn t selling enough cars and can t compete with the big guys. The Kizashi and the SX4 may be virtuous, but the buyers aren t coming. Suzuki s U.S. sales peaked in 2007, with about 102,000 units sold, and fell to just a quarter of that last year. It becomes a death spiral: Dealerships close, fewer cars are sold, the company has less money, debt piles up, and public image evaporates. Suzuki has no product in the pipeline for the U.S. and fewer corporate partners to lean on for rebadges.

    In other countries, the situation isn t so grim. Suzuki sells micro-size kei cars by the boatload in Japan, its Wagon R often the top-selling small car in the country. India, too, is a stronghold for Suzuki, where its Maruti Suzuki brand unloads cheap, cheerful transportation to an exploding middle class.

    Loss of Product Partners

    Suzuki s core competency is in small cars and small SUVs. Really small. So to offer a full product lineup in the U.S. Suzuki has had to snuggle up to several corporate partners. The late Forenza and Reno were developed by GM Daewoo in Korea, back when Suzuki owned 15 percent of GM Daewoo and General Motors owned 20 percent of Suzuki. The Equator pickup was a Nissan Frontier with the Superman logo slapped on the front, while the XL7 crossover was built on the General Motors Theta platform used for the Chevy Equinox .

    But Suzuki couldn t properly align with new friends to supply the product it needs—and even if it could, the result threatens profit margins. Ties are mostly severed with General Motors. A deal with Volkswagen fell through. Fiat, which sells a rebadged SX4 in Europe, has talked about closer ties with Suzuki but no deals have been announced. Developing products and platforms on your own is expensive and difficult; Suzuki can swing that kind of investment for the small cars it sells so well in other countries, but without much of a market for big ones like the Kizashi outside the U.S. it makes little sense.

    The market for cheap, imported econo-cars—often even designed overseas—from niche companies has all-but disappeared, with Suzuki one of the last survivors among a field that included Geo, Isuzu, Yugo, Daewoo, Eagle, and Daihatsu. Mitsubishi continues to limp along. All were felled by competition from the big boys.

    Decisions by Toyota and Honda to enter the small-SUV market in the mid-1990s was a headshot to Suzuki s business, long dependent on the Samurai, the Sidekick, and the Vitara. On the car side, the company was able to hold on a little longer. It wasn t until the mid-2000s when Kia and Hyundai introduced some truly competitive models here. When they did, their cheap cars with long warranties slaughtered what remained of the cheap-import segment.

    The new CAFE and greenhouse gas rules disproportionately penalize low-volume manufacturers of physically small vehicles. Porsche can weather the storm (and afford penalties), but Suzuki was at risk. Even with a special exemption called TLAAS, or Temporary Lead-Time Allowance Alternative Standard, Suzuki would have needed to post almost impossible reductions to its cars CO2 emissions—not because they re especially dirty, but because the EPA requires certain degrees of improvement. Suzuki and Porsche joined with Jaguar-Land Rover in voicing concerns to the EPA, but a final rule issued in October showed them only minimal clemency.

    Dealer Network

    Suzuki s retail system was a proper mess. There weren t enough sales to support more dealers opening, but too few dealers to really grow sales. Low-profit-margin products and small sales didn t always attract high-quality dealer managers and sales staff, which in turn probably turned off many customers. For years, dealers and Suzuki corporate alike complained about an antiquated, inefficient system for ordering vehicles in which the dealers had little input; they often didn t have access to the cars they could actually sell. It cost Suzuki dearly.

    Are We Going to Lose More Brands in the U.S.?

    Very possibly. Mitsubishi is the obvious skater on thin ice, and when asked this week, its U.S. boss was firm in insisting the company will stay. (You didn t expect him to be wishy-washy, did you?) But Mitsubishi is in very serious trouble globally as well as in the States, because like Suzuki, it s experiencing how inhospitable the world car market is for smaller manufacturers.

    There may come a time when Toyota pulls the plug on Scion. its own experiment with low-priced entry-level econoboxes repurposed from other markets. In Scion s favor, it s not hugely expensive to run, and Toyota has the cash to spare. Badging the new rear-drive sports car as the Scion FR-S instead of as a Toyota GT 86 in the U.S. is a something of a Hail Mary pass for the Scion brand.

    It s almost unthinkable, but Volvo may have to exit the U.S. market at some point as well. Volvo sales here in 2011 were just half of their 2003 level, and the company recently pruned several models from its lineup, including the S40 sedan, the C70 convertible, and the C30 hatchback. Whether Volvo remains largely will depend on the willingness of its owner, Geely, to put up with sluggish sales—and the importance of being in the U.S. to keep appearances as a global luxury brand.

    Like all of these companies, Suzuki had some very good cars on offer in American showrooms. The Kizashi and the SX4 may not have been class-leading, but they weren t at the back of the group either—and both were well priced. If you re looking to score a deal, now is a good time for either. Suzuki will continue to honor warranties and supply parts, a promise made stronger by the company s plan to continue car sales in Canada, and to remain in the U.S. selling motorcycles and ATVs.



    Most Car Dealers Are Lousy At Selling Electric Cars: Here s Why #car #hire #comparison


    #cars dealers
    #

    Most Car Dealers Are Lousy At Selling Electric Cars: Here’s Why

    5,508 views Nov 30, 2015

    George Matick Chevrolet, Redford, Michigan

    From carmakers and politicians to enthusiastic owners, there are many groups pushing for greater electric-car adoption.

    But more often that not, the dealers that actually sell the majority of electric cars aren’t so interested.

    Over the past few years, buyers have grumbled about the experience at traditional dealers that sell electric cars alongside internal-combustion models–and salespeople have complained about selling plug-ins.

    This does not apply to Tesla Motors, which sells cars solely through company-owned stores.

    But buyers of other electric cars still face a tough time at dealers. according to a recent report in The New York Times .

    One problem is that dealers apparently don’t think consumers are interested in electric cars.

    Money and car keys

    In a speech this year, Forrest McConnell–former chairman of the National Automobile Dealers Association (NADA) lobbying group–said that only 14 percent of buyers cited fuel efficiency as the most important factor in buying a new car.

    But it’s also possible that dealers are worried that electric cars will negatively affect their bottom lines, for a few reasons.

    Electric cars take longer to sell, because buyers are often unfamiliar with the technology.

    Calculating tax credits and applying other incentives also adds to the amount of time required to complete a single sale.

    That makes electric cars unattractive to salespeople, who make money based on the number of cars they sell.

    Taking the extra time to sell electric cars is proving hard for them to justify.

    Tesla Store Los Angeles [photo: Misha Bruk / MBH Architects]

    It also means salespeople may not be taking the necessary time to educate themselves about electric cars.

    The New York Times report included stories–relayed by buyers–of salespeople unsure of a given model’s range, or pushing oil changes that plug-ins do not need.

    Electric cars also require less regular maintenance, cutting into a major profit area for dealers.

    The NADA says on average, dealers make three times as much profit from service as they do from new-car sales.

    But a 2013 J.D. Power survey found that while 57 percent of gasoline-car buyers planned to take their vehicles back to the dealer for service, that was only the case for 48 percent of electric-car buyers.

    As long as dealers feel they have nothing to gain from selling more electric cars, they will likely remain a major bottleneck to greater adoption.

    Because if the person selling the car isn’t enthusiastic about it, how far should a customer be expected to compensate for that lack of interest?

    _______________________________________________



    Why car title loans are a bad idea. #usave #car #rental


    #car title loans
    #

    Why car title loans are a bad idea

    (AOL Autos ) — Cash advances are not a new concept in America’s brand of capitalism. Many people have seen the commercials with some guy barking out, Bad credit, no credit, no problem! Or, Don’t worry about credit, I own the bank!

    In addition to high interest, these car title loans usually include a number of fees that add up quickly.

    Anytime some guy is telling you he owns the bank, run.

    Even though these lenders have been around for a while, signing your car over for a high-interest loan has become a serious financial issue.

    For those of you who are unfamiliar with the concept of car title loans, allow us to explain.

    At times, the best of us get strapped for cash; we may have no credit or bad credit (just like they say in the commercials), which keeps us from getting small loans from a bank or some other more traditional means.

    A title loan offers you cash from the lender, in return you sign over the title of your paid-for car to secure the loan. Typically, these loans are due back in full 30 days later. There’s no credit check and only minimal income verification.

    It sounds pretty straightforward, but borrowing from these places can lead to a repossession of your car and a whole lot of financial trouble.

    Interest rates that make credit card companies blush

    Car title loans have been lumped into the predatory lending category by many consumers. Non-profit organizations such as Consumer Federation of America (CFA) and the Center for Responsible Lending have issued detailed reports outlining some of the title loan issues that the public should be leery about.

    Don’t Miss

    One of the biggest issues with these loans is interest rates. Many people dislike credit card interest rates, which average between the mid to high teens for most Americans. Car title loan interest rates make complaining about credit rates seem ludicrous.

    Car title lenders are in a different category than credit card companies or banks and work around usury laws. Thus, title loan lenders are able to charge triple digit annual percentage rates (APRs). Yes, triple digits. It’s not an exaggeration to see 250% APR and higher on these car tile loans and only a handful of states have passed strict laws that prohibit exorbitant percentage rates.

    Even if your credit card company is charging you a high interest of 25% APR, it’s nothing compared to car title loans. AOL Autos: Most popular used cars

    By federal law, title loan lenders have to disclose the interest rates in terms of the annual percentage. If you have to get a title loan, make sure they don’t just give you a quote of the monthly percentage rate, they have to give it to you as an APR. If they are unclear about the rates, which many can be, just know that a monthly rate of 25% is equivalent to a 300% APR.

    Fees and interest only payments

    In addition to high interest, these car title loans usually include a number of fees that add up quickly. These include processing fees, document fees, late fees, origination fees and lien fees. AOL Autos: Safest cars

    Sometimes there is also a roadside assistance program that borrowers can purchase for another small fee. Some lenders have even gone so far as to make the roadside assistance mandatory. The cost of all these fees can be anywhere from $80 to $115, even for a $500 loan.

    Most of these fees are legal, except one that lenders sometimes charge, the repossession fee. Lenders are not allowed to charge you to repossess your vehicle, but some still do. AOL Autos: Top minivans

    As if high interest rates and a mountain of fees weren’t enough, lenders also give borrowers the option of interest-only payments for a set period of time. In these cases, the loans are usually set up for a longer period of time (compared to the typical 30 days) and the borrower can pay the interest only on the loan.

    These types of payments are called balloon payments where the borrower pays the interest of the loan each month and at the end of the term they still owe the full amount of the loan.

    The CFA reported that one woman paid $400 a month for seven months on an interest-only payment term for a $3,000 loan. After paying $2,800 in interest, she still owed the original $3,000 in the eighth month. AOL Autos: Most popular crossover vehicles

    Rolling over and repossession

    If you think most of the people who take out these loans pay them back in full after one month, think again. Because of the high interest and the fact that these lenders cater to low-income borrowers, many people aren’t able to pay back their loans in the 30-day period. This is called rolling over the loan.

    The terms of these loans are crafted to keep borrowers in a cycle of debt and bring customers either to the verge of repossession or to actual repossession. Not being able pay off the initial loan and then renewing it the next month costs borrowers even more money in interest, on top of the original amount they’ve already borrowed. AOL Autos: Used luxury cars

    Let’s talk about repossession for minute. The CFA reported that, of the people they interviewed in their 2004 study, 75% had to give the title loan lenders a copy of their car keys. Some companies started the cars to see if they worked and took pictures of the vehicle even before a customer filled out the loan application.

    A company based in Arizona said they have GPS systems installed on the cars so they can track the cars and shut them off remotely if they don’t receive payment on time. That may be an extreme case, but these lenders take a customer’s promissory signature very seriously. If you can’t pay, they will come looking for you and your car.

    The concerns for having your car repossessed are obvious. How do you get to work, drop off the kids at school, pick up groceries or go out on the weekends without a car? As if those scenarios weren’t bad enough, owning a car can be some people’s biggest financial asset. If the car is taken away, so goes the money it was worth.

    Some states have laws that force the lenders to pay you the difference of the loan once a lender has repossessed and sold your car, but some don’t. It is possible to default on the loan and not get any money back for your car, even if you only borrowed a few hundred dollars.

    This occurs because car title loans are also over-secured. Typically, the maximum amount most lenders will give you is 25 to 50 percent of what your car is actually worth. However, if you can’t pay back the loan they may be able to sell your car and keep 100% of the profit. Some lenders won’t take possession of a vehicle but instead take the customer to court for the money. They then tack on court costs and finance charges on top of the existing loan amount.

    Alternatives

    Many car title loan lenders defend their business practices by saying they offer loans to people who would otherwise not be able to gain financial assistance. Although this may be partly true, signing over one of your most valuable assets for several hundred dollars is not the only option.

    Some credit unions, like in North Carolina, have begun providing loans that have low interest rates of about 12% APR, a fixed 31-day repayment plan (to keep from rolling over a loan) and set up direct deposit out of the borrower’s paycheck so that loans will be paid off in full.

    Other options may be paycheck cash advances from your employer, cash advances on credit cards, emergency community assistance, small consumer loans, or borrowing from friends or family.

    If you find yourself contemplating a car title loan, check out these alternative options and read the information for yourself at www.responsiblelending.org or www.consumerfed.org. If you still need to sign over your car for cash, educate yourself on the decision and know the possible repercussions of these types of loans.

    E-mail to a friend



    Why do I have to disengage 4-wheel drive? News and reviews. #trade #in #your #car


    #4 wheel drive cars
    #

    Why do I have to disengage 4-wheel drive?

    Boston.com Correspondent | 12.01.15 | 3:53 PM

    Q. I have been leasing a 2014 Toyota 4Runner since June 2014. Now that winter is around the corner I would like to get your opinion about a problem I experienced last winter while driving with four-wheel-drive engaged (4H). When I would make turns or back up, I would have to disengage the four-wheel drive mechanism. It was as if the emergency brake was applied. There was no problem while driving straight ahead or when driving in 2-wheel drive. I only use 4-wheel drive when road conditions dictate. I brought the 4Runner to the dealership to have the problem checked and the mechanic told me there was nothing wrong. The technician said that is how 4 x 4 s work, power needs to be evenly distributed to all four wheels and that does not happen when making turns and/or backing up. I told him I never experienced this problem with my old 2003 and 2006 4Runners, which also required turning a dial to engage the 4-wheel drive mechanism. I have also owned other 4 x 4 makes/models and never experienced this issue with any of them. I thought maybe I was crazy, but when I mentioned the issue to friends who own 4 x 4 s, they all say it is not normal. I have read a few blogs from other Toyota 4Runner owners complaining about the same problem. Can you shed any light on this problem?

    A. The repair tech is correct that there will be a drag when driving in reverse or turning but it shouldn t be as if the parking brake were on. I have driven many Toyota products off-road and there are many instances where the vehicle needs to be in four-wheel-drive and it is necessary to back-up or take tight turns. On a dry road in four-wheel-drive you will get a sensation of crab-walking or wheel-tripping and that sensation would be normal for most any traditional the four-wheel-drive. I recently drove the 2016 Tacoma off-road and although, I could feel the four-wheel drive system on turns or in reverse there was never a sense that I needed to switch out of four wheel drive to maneuver the truck. I would return to the dealer and go for a road test on a gravel road and demonstrate your concerns.

    Related Links

    Q. I have 2015 Lexus RX 350 and want to add a trailer hitch. I don t plan on towing a trailer at this time, but plan to use the trailer hitch for a bike rack or cargo rack. I have seen trailer hitches priced from $150.00 to more the $250.00 with labor to match. Is this something I can do myself?

    Advertisement – Continue Reading Below

    A. There are several companies that make custom trailer hitches (Reese, Valley, and Draw-Tite among a few). These hitches are all pre-assembled and in the case of your Lexus would just bolt to the frame. You will need to move one exhaust hanger temporarily before you bolt the hitch in place, but this is about as complicated as it gets. With the help of a friend, the installation shouldn t take more than 60 minutes.

    Q. Last week I was driving my daughter s 2014 GM Arcadia, and I noticed it had a calibrated heat gauge, which I like. However, the engine ran at 210 degrees. My Toyota and Nissans have 180 degree thermostats and get plenty hot. I always thought that engine temperatures above 190 degrees, was the beginning of engine meltdown. Is there any issue with these high engine temperatures and engine longevity?

    A. There was a time when 160 degrees was typical of a normal operating engine, but over the years engine temperatures have gone up. Today we see most engines operating at 185-205 degrees and even higher as in the case of your GMC. These higher temperatures are accomplished with a mixture of engine coolant and system pressure. A 50/50 mix of water and coolant raises the boiling point of water to 223 degrees and for each pound of system pressure raises the temperature by 2 degrees. A system running a 16 pound radiator cap and the proper mix of coolant would raise the boiling point to 255 degrees. Even at these temperatures there will be no damage to the engine.

    Q. I have a question and a concern about driving my 2014 Toyota Camry. The first is, I worry about other drivers and how every accident seems to be a way for someone to make money. The second issue is I wish I ordered my car with navigation. Would it be possible to have an aftermarket dash cam installed to protect me if I was involved in a crash? The second question can a factory navigation system be installed in a car that didn t come with one?

    A. Yes a skilled installer at a mobile audio store could certainly do the work and the end result would most likely look similar to the factory system. They could also easily put a dash cam in place, most likely mounted near the rear view mirror and essentially out of sight. A simpler solution might be a combination GPS and dash cam. Garmin has a new product- the NUVI Cam LMT. This unit replicates some of the best features found in new cars. It uses voice commands, real time traffic updates, forward collision warning and lane departure warning systems. There is a built in dash-cam that saves video files on an impact/crash. The maps are very good and when you are approaching your destination the display switches to a camera view to easily identify the destination in real time. My only complaint with this unit is it is big. The overall dimensions are 4 inches by 7 inches and takes up a fair amount of dash/windshield real estate.

    Q. My 2005 Dodge Caravan did something weird the other day when I went to start it. After I turned the key, all the gages went to full range, fluctuated and then went back to normal. It did start and ran good the rest of the day. When I tried to start it the next day, it did the same thing. I also noticed that the red flashing security light went out and never came back on. It has been about a week now and the car starts and runs fine, what do you think caused this?

    A. This type of problem is usually related to a poor electrical connection. I would look at the main battery cables and well as all the grounding points. Some of these older Caravans also had issues with the instrument clusters. If it is the instrument cluster there is no easy repair other than replacing the circuit board on the back of the gauge cluster.



    Why Ontario drivers pay the highest car insurance rates in the country – The Globe and Mail #car #camera


    #car insurance ontario
    #

    Why Ontario drivers pay the highest car insurance rates in the country Add to.

    Nick Dasko bought his first car when he was 22 – a seven-year-old Mazda Protege that cost him $10,000. Then came the insurance bill: more than $6,000, even though he had no tickets or at-fault accidents.

    Some of his friends were paying even more – $10,000 was not unheard of.

    Auto insurance is the wild west of compulsory services. If you want to drive, you have no choice but to buy it – but what you pay varies wildly. According to quotes obtained Tuesday from kanetix.ca, a 20-year-old male in Winnipeg with a clean driving record would pay $1,396 driving a 2008 Honda Civic DX two-door coupe for pleasure (not to commute to school or work) and compiling 15,000 km/year. In Calgary, that same driver would pay between $2,973 and  $3,789. In Toronto, the bill would range from $4,239 to $9,270  – an increase of 664 per cent.

    The obvious question – why?

    While it costs more to cover claims in Ontario (the province is plagued by insurance fraud) private insurers claim that the actuarial evidence used to rate drivers shows that males under 25 have the worst statistical record as a group. Consequently, individuals in the 16-to-24 group pay more, even if they’ve never been involved in an accident or received a ticket for a traffic violation. Essentially, young men are deemed guilty until proven innocent – at age 25.

    “You are being prejudged,” says Dasko. “It’s the last legal form of discrimination.”

    Public auto insurance programs, such as those in Manitoba and Saskatchewan, take a different approach. Standard rates apply to every driver, regardless of age or gender. Auto insurance is much less expensive for a 20-year-old full-time student in Winnipeg driving the same car as his counterparts in Toronto, Montreal and Calgary.

    The private insurance industry defends the actuarial approach. “It’s not discriminatory,” says Pete Karageorgos, manager of consumer and industry relations for the Insurance Bureau of Canada. “It’s based purely on statistical analysis. It’s like charging more for house insurance in a high-risk neighbourhood. I think people have accepted this. In a public auto insurance system, young drivers are subsidized. In Ontario, young drivers pay rates that reflect their actual risk.”

    Statistics show that young drivers do cause a disproportionate amount of damage. Drivers aged 16 to 24 represent 13 per cent of the driving population, but account for 24 per cent of fatalities and 26 per cent of serious injuries. The question is whether Ontario’s steep insurance charges for young drivers accurately reflect actuarial data.

    State Farm Insurance spokesman John Bordignon says Toronto is a “special case”: “It’s got the highest population density, the worst roads, and a high rate of theft. The costs reflect those risks.”

    Contrary to the public system, in Ontario, Alberta and other provinces, every driver must help bear layers of extra costs. Ontario’s industry is made up of more than 100 private companies that are overseen by a government agency called the Financial Services Commission of Ontario. Revenue comes from two sources – insurance premiums, and the money insurers make by investing the money consumers give them.

    Private insurers say that their system has the built-in advantage of competition: “If you’re not satisfied with your insurer, you can go shop around,” says Karageorgos. “With government insurance, there’s no choice. Private insurance gives you better service.”

    Not everyone agrees. The Consumers Association of Canada (CAC) deems private auto insurance to be one of the biggest rip-offs that Canadians face. After studying the industry for years, CAC concluded that a properly run public insurance system was the best choice, but found itself locked into a debilitating public relations battle with the private industry.

    “There are some things that should be run by private industry,” says CAC president Bruce Cran. “And there are others that should be in the hands of government. Auto insurance is one of them.”

    Cran says that excessive insurance charges affect everyone, not just drivers: “The costs run through the entire economy,” he says. “Everything you buy, every last piece of bread you eat, is carried in a vehicle that has to be insured. So we all pay, whether we have a car or not.”

    The CAC’s investigation of the insurance industry yielded interesting insights into the way it operates, and why costs are so high. In 2004, for example, CAC learned that private insurers had paid $290-million in secret commissions to insurance brokers who steered business their way. This practice had a direct impact on consumers – instead of hunting for the best price for their customers, brokers sold the policy that offered them the highest commission.

    A public auto insurance system can offer fundamental business advantages. Most important, a public system reduces overhead costs – instead of multiple companies, each with its own head office, computer systems, etc. there is just one, which cuts duplication and creates efficiencies of scale.

    Other significant savings include profit margin (public insurance systems don’t have to pay dividends to shareholders) and advertising – public systems don’t have to budget for TV spots and a talking gecko. Public insurance plans can also control costs more effectively – body shops, medical clinics and towing companies must comply with rates set by the public plan, which wields monopoly power over suppliers. Ontario’s private insurers, on the other hand, face ongoing problems with gouging and fraud.

    As with U.S. health care, the debate over private and public auto insurance has been cast along ideological lines that obscure underlying economic realities. Ontario’s private insurance firms admit that rates here are the highest, yet insist that theirs is the superior business model.

    CROSS-CANADA PREMIUM QUOTES

    Using the website kanetix.ca on Tuesday, we obtained quotes for a 20-year-old full-time male student, in the 16-to-24 age group. We listed him as principal driver, clean record, living at home, using a 2008 Honda Civic DX two-door coupe for pleasure (not to commute to school or work) and compiling 15,000 km/year. Deductible was $500 for collision and comprehensive, with $1-million liability. The site harvests quotes from different companies, but those companies do not necessarily quote for all cities; the Canadian Automobile Association does not sell service in Montreal. The Manitoba rate was obtained directly from a dedicated website. *Kanetix provides a “lowest rate” but does not identify it until the consumer calls for a quote.



    Why Used Car Trade-In Prices Don’t Match Your Expectations. #convertible #cars


    #trade in car value
    #

    Why Used Car Trade-In Prices Don’t Match Your Expectations

    There are many reasons why used car trade-in prices are so low and as a person who is looking to get good value, you need to understand all of them. One of the best car trade-in tips anyone can give you is to consider many different dealers when going through with your auto trade-in. Some of them are looking for specific types of vehicles and this can help you get a higher price. So, why are used car trade-in prices are so low at most places? It has to do with the idea of leverage mainly.

    The car dealerships have all of the leverage over you because when you choose a car, you are already captive. You have made a large decision and they know you want the new car. This means they can use their power to get you to pay a lower price for the trade-in. These car dealerships understand you do not want to go through the hassle of selling your car, which is why they can keep used car trade-in prices at such a low level. As long as you are coming to them with new car needs, they own all of the power.

    Another reason why auto trade-in prices remain low is that car dealerships understand you are probably financing your next car. Because you are already taking out money in the form of a loan to pay off the new car, they figure you won t mind having to get an extra $1,000 or something similar. If you were paying in cash, they might be more wary of giving a fair price, because there would be a much better chance you would decide not to make the purchase.

    Ultimately, you have to do something to change the leverage if you want to get fair trade-in value for a vehicle. This means going to a dealer that needs your particular type of car on their lot or making sure dealers understand your willingness to sell your own car if necessary.

    Research Wholesale and Trade-in Value

    Use a vehicle valuation service like Kelley Blue Book to get an idea of your vehicle s trade-in value. Dealerships try to purchase vehicles for as close to the fair trade value as possible. This amount is roughly equivalent to the wholesale or auction value of a vehicle. It is uncommon for dealerships to pay more for a trade-in than they would to purchase a comparable vehicle at auction. But remember that the dealership buying your trade will also result in them selling another vehicle. You may make this point when you are negotiating with the salesperson.

    Fix Any Damage on the Vehicle

    If there is any visible physical or mechanical damage on your vehicle, get it repaired before visiting the dealership for an appraisal. Physical and mechanical damage is the single biggest factor that can negatively impact your vehicle s trade value. If there is a lot of damage on your vehicle, the dealership will assume the worst when it comes to possible repair costs. If your vehicle has excessive damage or has un-repaired collision damage, it may be best to keep the trade out of the transaction altogether.

    Get Multiple Quotes

    Just as you should request multiple price quotes on your new car, you should request multiple trade-in appraisals on your current car. You can use competing appraisals to pit dealerships against each other and ultimately get the best trade-in value.

    Be Flexible on the Trade Value

    Most car shoppers complete research on their trade-in value online before ever visiting the dealership. Most shoppers are understandably biased when believing that their vehicle is in excellent condition. In reality, only a small percentage of used vehicles are in excellent condition, so it is unrealistic to expect the dealership to offer excellent book value for a trade. Remember that what is perfect to you might be imperfect to the new owner, and the dealership will complete at minimum a safety inspection on the vehicle, but they may spend over $1,000 to recondition and detail your vehicle for sale on the lot.

    Some dealerships will offer you less for your trade but may be willing to discount the new vehicle more than others. When this happens, it may be a case of the new car manager providing a large discount but the used car buyer being uninterested in your car. In any case, having a larger top line discount may still give you a better overall deal. If you get less for trade at one dealer but the overall deal is better, the best choice is to go with the lowest overall bottom line price.

    Trade-in vs. Private Party Sale

    If you are having difficulty getting the preferred amount for your trade, you may want to consider selling the vehicle privately. Private party sales bring more money than trade-ins, as you do not have overhead and reconditioning costs to factor into your price.



    Why used-car prices are rising so much #car #care #products


    #value used car
    #

    Why used-car prices are rising so much

    On Tuesday I wrote about how a shortage of homes for sale in many areas, combined with an uptick in demand, is pushing prices upward. Something similar is happening in the used-car market.

    A shortage of used cars – combined with higher demand from buyers who have lost a job, wrecked their credit scores or just become more frugal – has narrowed the gap between new- and used-car prices.

    Since 2007, the average trade-in value of a 6-year-old car has escalated much more rapidly in percentage terms – and almost as much in dollar terms – compared with a new car.

    The used car has risen by $2,124, or 33 percent, to $8,495. The new car has risen $2,434, or 9 percent, to $30,545, according to Edmunds. com.

    Some late-model used cars that hold their residual value cost almost as much as a new version, especially if you factor in year-end incentives on new cars.

    Auto experts say the run-up in used-car prices is abating, making this a good time to trade in a late-model used car (up to five years) for a 2012 vehicle.

    “In terms of getting the best deal for a used car, right now is a good time,” says Jeff Piol. pricing manager with Edmunds.

    Normally the magazine recommends buying a 2- to 3-year-old car because you miss paying for the years when a car depreciates fastest and still get a reliable car with the newest technology and safety features. “That pool of cars has dramatically shrunk,” Bartlett says, making new cars a better option in some cases.

    In a recent blog post, Consumer Reports compared buying a 2012 car with a 2010 model (with 28,000 miles) and a 2008 (with 47,000 miles) for five popular vehicles. It assumed the buyer put 10 percent down and took out a five-year loan at 3.365 percent for the new car and 3.31 percent for used.

    It found that a 2012 Honda Pilot would cost $531 a month compared with $496 for the 2010 version. For an extra $35 a month, the buyer could get a new car with zero miles and a full 3-year, 36,000 mile warranty, it said, concluding the new car was the better buy.

    It deemed the 2008 Pilot a better deal than the 2012 version because the buyer would save $150 per month, which could offset maintenance.

    However, for cars that are being redesigned for 2013 – such as the Ford Fusion and Honda Accord – buying a heavily discounted 2012 model might be better than buying a 2010 or a 2008. Payments on the new cars would be only $90 to $97 more than on the 2008 models. (Full report at sfg.ly/Pvzqt2 .)

    Edmunds found examples where payments on a new car were about the same – and in a few cases, less – than payments on a 1-year-old car or a certified pre-owned car. (See sfg.ly/VmdrqK ).

    Reasons for shortage

    What’s driving the used-car shortage?

    During the recession, new-car sales went off a cliff – plunging from 16.1 million in 2008 to 10.4 million in 2009. They started recovering in 2010 and are expected to hit about 14.3 million this year.

    But the steep drop-off in 2008-09 means fewer used cars are coming onto the market. The sales slump included leased vehicles, which typically come back after two to three years. That explains why late-model cars have been in especially short supply.

    Meanwhile, people are also holding onto their vehicles longer. The average age of cars and light trucks on the road was 10.8 years in 2011 compared with 9.8 years in 2007 and 8.8 in 1999, according to Polk, an automotive research and marketing firm.

    Patrick Nohr. an independent used-car dealer in Walnut Creek who also brokers new cars, says the supply of used cars got so tight he started running an ad in a local paper last year asking people to sell him their cars. He’s still running the ad, even though he gets few responses.

    “Good used cars are still hard to come by,” Nohr says. He says he used to buy a lot of late-model lease returns at auction, but prices got so high he can’t make a profit after he reconditions them. He says he is outbid by dealers who can sell them as certified pre-owned, and command a high price.

    He said low-end cars – the kind parents buy for their kids – are also hard to find, in part because of programs in California that paid people to retire older vehicles. “Cars we might have sold for $3,000 to $3,500 a couple years are now $5,000 to $5,500,” he says.

    Mid-range cars are also in demand from people whose credit has been affected by a home or job loss. “They have to buy cars they can pay cash for,” and they might have saved up $7,000 or 8,000.

    Meanwhile, dealers can cut prices on new cars and attempt to make it up “on the back end, with extended warranties and undercoating,” Nohr says.

    Trade-in values

    Linda Goldberg, a car buying expert with CarQ who represents buyers, says consumers who trade in well maintained cars should expect to get more than the trade-in values published by sources such as Edmunds.com, Kbb.com and Nadaguides.com.

    “What I’m seeing in the last few months is dealers offering $1,000 or $2,000 more than the published trade in value. I haven’t seen that happen in a very long time,” she says.

    A better target for sellers would be the private-party value.

    She is working with a client who is trading in a 2010 Audi. For a similarly equipped car, the trade-in value according to Edmunds is $36,505, the private party value is $38,686 and the dealer retail (what a dealer would supposedly sell it for) is $41,023.

    But she has seen dealers advertising this car for $44,681 to $48,990.

    If the client sold it himself, he could expect to get $44,000 or $45,000.

    At a plateau

    Piol says used-car prices seem to have reached a plateau and “will probably soften” as more supply enters the market and more buyers opt for new cars.

    The National Automobile Dealers Association does not expect the supply of late-model used cars (up to 5 years old) to begin increasing until 2014, says Larry Dixon. a senior automotive analyst with the NADA Used Car Guide .

    But he has seen “some softness” in the price of used compact and midsize cars in the past few months. “Consumers have become desensitized to fuel prices and we haven’t seen prices” for small and midsize cars grow like they did a few years go. What’s hot in the used-car market today are sport utility vehicles and pickups.

    With car values depreciating more slowly, consumers find themselves with positive equity – meaning their cars are worth more than they owe – much sooner than in the past, Dixon notes.

    Now if we could just get homeowners in the same position, the economy would be in better shape.

    Consumers hot for used cars

    The price of a used car has escalated more rapidly, in percentage terms, than the price of a new car



    10 cheapest cars: Why (almost) nobody buys them #price #of #used #cars


    #cheapest used cars
    #

    Story Highlights

      Nissan Versa sedan is lowest-price new car at $12,780 Dealers seldom stock bare-bones models Most buyers demand more features

    522 CONNECT TWEET 50 LINKEDIN 61 COMMENT EMAIL MORE

    Cheap new cars can be a disappointment zone.

    If you go looking for the $12,780 2014 Nissan Versa sedan that went on sale Tuesday as America’s lowest-price new car, good luck. Dealers almost never stock the lowest-price model.

    They say nobody buys the bottom version, and shoppers say that’s because they aren’t available. Automakers say the so-called “take rate” for the lowest-price version of any model runs from 2% to 5%.

    Using that new Versa as an example, the bottom-price model has a manual transmission. Few can or will drive a stick-shift nowadays. Moving up to the conventional four-speed automatic adds $1,000.

    And you still don’t have the high-mileage version you probably saw advertised.

    That’s the one with the CVT (continuously variable-ratio automatic transmission), which is rated an appealing 40 mpg on the highway. Lowest-price CVT model is the S Plus, starting at $14,580, including shipping.

    Suddenly, instead of a chops-licking, less-than-$13,000 new car, you’re getting close to $15,000.

    At which point buyers often start thinking about nicely equipped, lightly used cars instead of new ones.

    It’s not just Nissan. Most automakers price their vehicles that way.

    Of course, there’s more profit in even slightly higher-price models, so that’s what car companies want to make and dealers want to keep on the lot and in the showroom.

    In addition to being hard to find, bare-bones cars just aren’t that desirable, even among those who swear they “just want basic transportation.” Often “basic” means sans air conditioning, power windows and a radio.

    Power windows sounds like a luxury until you picture yourself reaching from the driver’s seat across the car to hand-crank the passenger-side window.

    Using Versa again, the average transaction price is $16,092, according to research and shopping site TrueCar.com. Three cars have lower average transaction prices: SmartForTwo ($14,264), Chevrolet Spark ($14,707) and Mazda2 ($15,528).

    Transaction price is all-in, out the door, so it includes taxes and license fees as well as factory rebates, shipping and dealer discounts.

    And cheap-to-buy often isn’t cheap to own. A low-price vehicle frequently depreciates faster than a more expensive car, so at trade-in time, the gap between the value of what you have and what you want is pretty big. Depreciation is the single biggest cost of owning a car, but often overlooked because it doesn’t hit until years after you buy the car.

    The 10 cheapest new cars in the U.S.

    The list was complied by kbb.com and USA TODAY research. Rankings are based on sticker prices, including shipping charges. All are 2013 models except the 2014 Versa.

    •Nissan Versa S Sedan, $12,780

    •Chevrolet Spark LS Hatchback, $12,995

    •Smart ForTwo Pure Coupe, $13,240

    •Ford Fiesta S Sedan, $13,995

    •Kia Rio LX Sedan, $14,350

    •Ford Fiesta S Hatchback, $14,995

    •Chevrolet Sonic Sedan, $14,995

    •Toyota Yaris 3-door, $15,165



    Why Berlin Used Cars? #auto #loan #rates


    #used auto
    #

    Why Berlin Used Cars?

    Berlin City Auto Group has three used car dealerships in New England: Portland, Maine; Gorham, New Hampshire; and Williston, Vermont. So, if you’re in the market for a high quality, reliable and affordable used car, you’ve come to the right place. Whether you’re shopping around for a heavy-duty pickup truck, a sporty two-seater, a family sedan, or a rugged SUV, we’ve got the vehicle for you. Buying a used car isn’t always easy, at Berlin City, we make it Easy .

    Why Choose Berlin City Used Cars?

    There are so many reasons why people choose Berlin City Auto Group over all the other used car dealerships in New England. Here are just a few of the amazing car-buying incentives that bring people to us daily:

    • Quality. At Berlin City, we’d never sell you a car that we wouldn’t drive ourselves. That’s why we take the guesswork out of used car buying by exhaustively inspecting every pre-owned vehicle before it hits our showroom floor.
    • Selection. There’s no one-size-fits-all when it comes to used car buying, but there is one place to find that one perfect used car. With over 500 pre-owned vehicles in stock, it won’t take long to find a car that fits your financial and lifestyle needs.
    • Price. When buying a used car, transparency is the best policy. Each of our Berlin City used cars are priced at or below market value, so you can skip shopping around saving you time and energy, and drive off knowing you got a great deal.
    • Guarantee. If you’re used car needs a repair within the first 60 days or 2,000 miles, bring it in. We’ll fix it.
    • Door-To-Door Delivery. From our lot to your driveway within 24 hours.

    Why Choose A Certified Used Car?

    One major draw of a certified used car is the guarantee of a like-new vehicle, with an extended manufacturer warranty and many times, special rates and incentives that you don’t typically find on non-certified pre-owned vehicles. In order to offer these benefits, the vehicle itself must meet stringent inspection, time and mileage criteria to ensure that the customer gets the most value for their dollar.

    In addition, Berlin City Auto Group offers three classifications of certified used cars: Berlin City Certified, ValueSmart Certified and Manufacturer/Brand Certified.

    • Berlin City Certified. All of our Berlin City Certified Used Cars come with a 4 day/200-mile no questions return, 2 Months/2,000 mile limited warranty, 130-point quality assurance inspection, comprehensive road test, available service contract, special financing for qualified buyers, door-to-door delivery, value price guarantee and peace of mind with a full vehicle history report.
    • ValueSmart Certified. All of our Berlin City ValueSmart Certified Used Cars come with a 4 day/200-mile no questions return, 2 Months/2,000 mile limited warranty, 49-point quality assurance inspection, comprehensive safety test, available service contract, special financing for qualified buyers, door-to-door delivery, value price guarantee, and peace of mind with a full vehicle history report.
    • Manufacturer Certified Pre-Owned (CPO). Berlin City Auto Group offers specific manufacturer/brand certified used cars for the consumer who is looking for a specific manufacturer/brand. The manufacturer/brands we offer include: Chevrolet. GMC. Honda. Lexus. Kia. Nissan. Scion and Toyota .

    View Inventory

    Search our large selection of vehicles.

    • Berlin City Certified Inventory
    • ValueSmart Inventory
    • Learn More about Manufacturer CPO Programs


    10 cheapest cars: Why (almost) nobody buys them #occasion #auto


    #cheapest used cars
    #

    Story Highlights

      Nissan Versa sedan is lowest-price new car at $12,780 Dealers seldom stock bare-bones models Most buyers demand more features

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    Cheap new cars can be a disappointment zone.

    If you go looking for the $12,780 2014 Nissan Versa sedan that went on sale Tuesday as America’s lowest-price new car, good luck. Dealers almost never stock the lowest-price model.

    They say nobody buys the bottom version, and shoppers say that’s because they aren’t available. Automakers say the so-called “take rate” for the lowest-price version of any model runs from 2% to 5%.

    Using that new Versa as an example, the bottom-price model has a manual transmission. Few can or will drive a stick-shift nowadays. Moving up to the conventional four-speed automatic adds $1,000.

    And you still don’t have the high-mileage version you probably saw advertised.

    That’s the one with the CVT (continuously variable-ratio automatic transmission), which is rated an appealing 40 mpg on the highway. Lowest-price CVT model is the S Plus, starting at $14,580, including shipping.

    Suddenly, instead of a chops-licking, less-than-$13,000 new car, you’re getting close to $15,000.

    At which point buyers often start thinking about nicely equipped, lightly used cars instead of new ones.

    It’s not just Nissan. Most automakers price their vehicles that way.

    Of course, there’s more profit in even slightly higher-price models, so that’s what car companies want to make and dealers want to keep on the lot and in the showroom.

    In addition to being hard to find, bare-bones cars just aren’t that desirable, even among those who swear they “just want basic transportation.” Often “basic” means sans air conditioning, power windows and a radio.

    Power windows sounds like a luxury until you picture yourself reaching from the driver’s seat across the car to hand-crank the passenger-side window.

    Using Versa again, the average transaction price is $16,092, according to research and shopping site TrueCar.com. Three cars have lower average transaction prices: SmartForTwo ($14,264), Chevrolet Spark ($14,707) and Mazda2 ($15,528).

    Transaction price is all-in, out the door, so it includes taxes and license fees as well as factory rebates, shipping and dealer discounts.

    And cheap-to-buy often isn’t cheap to own. A low-price vehicle frequently depreciates faster than a more expensive car, so at trade-in time, the gap between the value of what you have and what you want is pretty big. Depreciation is the single biggest cost of owning a car, but often overlooked because it doesn’t hit until years after you buy the car.

    The 10 cheapest new cars in the U.S.

    The list was complied by kbb.com and USA TODAY research. Rankings are based on sticker prices, including shipping charges. All are 2013 models except the 2014 Versa.

    •Nissan Versa S Sedan, $12,780

    •Chevrolet Spark LS Hatchback, $12,995

    •Smart ForTwo Pure Coupe, $13,240

    •Ford Fiesta S Sedan, $13,995

    •Kia Rio LX Sedan, $14,350

    •Ford Fiesta S Hatchback, $14,995

    •Chevrolet Sonic Sedan, $14,995

    •Toyota Yaris 3-door, $15,165



    Why Diesel? #used #cars #jacksonville #fl


    #diesel cars
    #

    Why Diesel?

    Today’s diesel vehicles are clean, quiet and fun-to-drive, and many consumers are learning diesel is an environmentally conscious option that does not sacrifice power or performance.

    Why Diesel?

    Clean diesel cars, trucks and SUVs typically achieve an impressive 20 to 40 percent improvement in fuel economy and 10 to 20 percent reduction in emissions when compared to a similar gasoline powered vehicles (www.fueleconomy.gov ). Recent advances in emission control technology, combined with the introduction of ultra-low sulfur diesel fuel in 2006 enabled diesel-powered cars and pickup trucks to be certified for sale in all 50 states, generating greater interest in this new generation of clean diesel cars and SUVs. These changes, combined with market success of a limited range of existing diesel products have prompted vehicle manufacturers to consider diesel as a new option for passenger vehicles or to expand the number of diesel offerings available.

    Clean diesel engines eliminated black smoke since 2007 with the introduction of new particulate filters. And because diesels deliver up to 40 percent better real-world fuel economy. national fuel economy standards for cars and light-duty trucks beginning in 2017 are also expected to be met in part by an increasing number of clean diesel passenger vehicle choices. Today’s diesel vehicles are clean, quiet and fun-to-drive, and many consumers are learning diesel is an environmentally conscious option that does not sacrifice power or performance. Clean diesel technology in today’s properly maintained vehicles emits near zero levels of emissions. Exhaust from new clean diesel trucks is so clean it passes the “white handkerchief test.” If you hold a handkerchief next to the tailpipe and rev the engine, it stays white – picking up no smell or black soot. That’s why we call it #cleandiesel.

    Clean diesel is not a “bridge” concept or “down-the-road” expectation – these vehicles are on the road right now providing impressive hybrid-like mileage and meeting the same emissions standards as gasoline vehicles. Just as important is the fact that automakers are introducing more diesel-powered models every year and consumers are warming up to the efficiency and unique characteristics of the powertrain. In fact, many drivers report fuel economy benefits that consistently rival a hybrid, and exceed EPA window stickers posted mileage. These vehicles are clean with low CO2 emissions, they provide great performance, they are renewable fuel-ready and most important – they are available to the American public right now.

    While diesel passenger vehicles currently make up a modest 2.88 percent of the entire U.S. vehicle market, Diesel Technology Forum has collected consensus forecasts from auto and market analysts who predict that diesel cars, pickups and SUVs will comprise about seven percent of the market by 2020 or just over one million diesel-powered cars and trucks on the road, saving almost eight million tons of carbon emissions and about 24 million barrels of crude oil.

    Auto analysts and other comparative studies have also determined a significant savings that diesel owners experience compared to gas vehicle owners based on fuel costs, resale value and operating costs. Diesel vehicles saved owners as much as $2,000 to $6,000 in Total Cost of Ownership (TCO) during a three to five year period when compared to similar gasoline vehicles.

    Biofuel Compatible

    Diesel technology’s future value is further enhanced by its suitability for hybrid applications and its readiness to use a diverse range of first and second generation renewable and biodiesel fuels making diesel a clean and sustainable choice.

    Diesel engines were originally invented to run on vegetable oils. Today, most diesel engines can run on high-quality blends of biodiesel with little modification as well as next-generation, drop-in renewable diesel fuels which offer even further benefits. This flexibility of the diesel platform can accelerate the introduction of these renewable diesel fuels across the economy.

    Diesel drivers have the option to fill up with blends of biodiesel at the pump. Most new and existing diesel vehicles and equipment are compatible with lower level biodiesel or renewable diesel fuel blends, between five percent and 20 percent depending on manufacturer warranties.

    When powered with a blend of five percent biodiesel, or B5, the anticipated growth in the light-duty car fleet will save a further 200 million gallons of gasoline and reduce CO2 emissions by a further 150,000 tonnes by 2023.

    Top 10 States of Diesel Drivers in 2014 – Total Diesel Passenger Vehicles

    Top 10 States of Diesel Drivers in 2014 – Highest Percentage of Diesel Passenger Vehicles


    Why Honda s Unloading Electric Cars for Cheap #car #servicing


    #electric cars for sale
    #

    Why Honda’s Unloading Electric Cars for Cheap

    Photograph by Qilai Shen/Bloomberg

    A Honda Fit electric vehicle at the Shanghai auto show

    When Honda Motor (HMC ) introduced its all-electric Fit EV in July 2012, it set a modest goal of delivering 1,100 of the lease-only cars in two years. Yet through May, the company had found just 176 takers for the plug-in. Consumers didn t leap to pay $389 a month for a subcompact that can go only about 82 miles before it needs recharging, especially when the gas-powered version gets 30 miles a gallon and costs half as much. General Motors (GM ). maker of the plug-in Chevy Volt hybrid, and Nissan Motor (7201:JP ). which makes the all-electric Leaf, have also seen sales fall short of their goals.

    This is a problem for automakers under increasing pressure to push zero-emission vehicles on skeptical consumers. Nine states, including New York, Massachusetts, and New Jersey, have followed California s lead in requiring that electric, plug-in hybrid, and hydrogen-powered models make up 15 percent of new-car sales and leases by 2025. They ve got a long way to go: About one-third of 1 percent of the 6.4 million new vehicles sold in the first five months of 2013 were zero-emission, says the National Automobile Dealers Association.

    Under a complicated formula that varies by state, automakers earn zero emission vehicle credits for each electric vehicle they sell or lease, and they re expected to rack up a certain number of credits each year. Not all green cars are equal: All-electric models such as the Fit EV are worth more credits than plug-in hybrid models with gasoline engines like the Volt. The number of credits the carmakers must earn rises each year, and the companies face fines for falling short. (They can buy credits from other companies, such as electric-only Tesla Motors (TSLA ). that sell too few cars to be subject to regulation yet still earn credits which they are allowed to sell. Tesla made $85 million selling California and federal credits in the first quarter of 2013.)

    The Fit EV, along with Ford Motor s (F ) all-electric Focus and Toyota Motor s (TM ) battery-powered RAV4, are known within the industry as compliance cars, limited-edition models manufactured to meet the zero-emission sales requirements. The Fit EV is on the market only in California and the other states with electric car quotas. They are essentially forcing vehicles to be built and delivered to dealers who are forced to sell them, says Bailey Wood, the dealer association s legislative director.

    This has left car companies struggling to find ways to make their electric offerings more attractive. One thing that s working: leasing the cars at fire sale prices. With a two-year supply of Fit EVs sitting on dealer lots, Honda cut its 36-month lease rate in June by about one-third, to $259 a month, with no down payment and unlimited mileage. GM and Nissan are also offering steeply discounted leases on plug-ins. Demand for the Fit has surged; within weeks, Honda went from bemoaning a stockpile of cars to apologizing to customers put on a waiting list and promising that more Fit EVs are on the way.

    The car s newfound popularity will help Honda meet its quotas, but the low prices may not be sustainable. Rock-bottom leases likely mean little to no profit Honda won t say whether it s losing money on the Fit and condition buyers to expect the car to come cheap. Requiring minimum numbers of plug-in vehicle sales is inherently a risky strategy, says Edward Cohen, Honda s vice president for government and industry affairs. The mandate directs manufacturers to offer consumers technology options along a predetermined time frame and with specified numbers, notwithstanding whether the technology and market are ready.

    In March the Alliance of Automobile Manufacturers, whose members include GM and Toyota, and the Association of Global Automakers, which counts Honda among its members, filed a petition with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to block California s sales targets. The sales data tell the story of what consumers want, says Alliance spokeswoman Gloria Bergquist. The early adopters have purchased plug-in electric vehicles, but mainstream consumers have not followed.

    Yet electric car advocates say the temporarily low prices will ultimately lead to greater sales as buyers give the cars a try, get over their doubts, and become converts. Both a market push and market pull are needed, and they need to be in sync, says Roland Hwang of the Natural Resources Defense Council. We need both a long-term, stable signal for automakers to produce electric cars and a robust, growing consumer market.



    Why Buy Used Cars, Rental Vehicles for Sale – Enterprise Car Sales #auto #mall


    #buy used cars
    #

    Why Buy a Used Vehicle

    Consider the Advantages

    Buying a used vehicle can save you money because a new vehicle experiences its greatest loss in value within the first 12 to 18 months. Rather than watching value decrease significantly in just the first year, consider buying a used car or truck. A used rental car can have a lower purchase price with lower monthly payments, and the factory warranties are usually still available. Buying a used vehicle allows you to upgrade to the newer make and model you want and add more optional features.

    Why Throw Money Away on New Car Depreciation?

    Thinking about buying a new vehicle? Think again. According to the experts at Kelley Blue Book . in three years a new vehicle could depreciate by as much as 73 percent of its value. At best it will retain a mere 62 percent of its value after three years. That s one major advantage to buying a used vehicle.

    Car depreciation is the dark cloud hanging over new purchases. While most vehicles depreciate by 15 to 20 percent of their value each year, the first year tends to hurt the most. In fact, the two-minute drive off the lot can cost some owners up to 15 percent of their new vehicle s value.

    If you re a car buyer unwilling to throw away money on vehicle depreciation for that new car smell, consider buying a high-quality, late-model used car. In addition to a lower purchase price, lower registration and license fees, you ll also enjoy lower depreciation, as the previous owner has already absorbed the steepest portion of the used vehicle s depreciation cost. Some popular used models include Civic. Accord. CRV. Camry. Wrangler. Tacoma. Challenger. Mini. Explorer. Escape. Altima and Outback .

    Used Rental Car Value

    Consider the Benefits of Buying a Used Rental Car

    Millions of used rental vehicles (and leased vehicles) are sold annually in the United States. Many were passed directly to auctions and on to used car dealerships. However, tens of thousands were selected by the rental and lease companies for their own car resale businesses. These used vehicles represent the cream of the crop and are often considered some of the best used cars on the market. These used vehicles, while driven by multiple motorists, receive much more care than the average consumer-owned used car and offer the following benefits:

    • Great selection: The typical used car for sale at Enterprise Car Sales is one to two years old. This creates a selection of vehicles that are contemporary, stylish, and sought after.
    • One owner: If offered a used vehicle owned by an auto expert committed to vehicle maintenance and care, the average used car buyer might be tempted to sign sight unseen. Enterprise Car Sales offers this opportunity. Used cars are our business, and our livelihood depends on keeping them expertly maintained.
    • Low mileage: Used rental vehicles or used leased vehicles often have less than 40,000 miles when they are put up for sale.
    • Reasonable prices: All used vehicles sold by Enterprise Car Sales are offered at low prices, and with a no-haggle policy, buyers get a great used car price without the pressure of bargaining.

    Used rental cars provide a tremendous value. Make a smart move and consider buying one the next time you re in the market for a used vehicle.



    Why do I have to disengage 4-wheel drive? News and reviews. #car #air #fresheners


    #4 wheel drive cars
    #

    Why do I have to disengage 4-wheel drive?

    Boston.com Correspondent | 12.01.15 | 3:53 PM

    Q. I have been leasing a 2014 Toyota 4Runner since June 2014. Now that winter is around the corner I would like to get your opinion about a problem I experienced last winter while driving with four-wheel-drive engaged (4H). When I would make turns or back up, I would have to disengage the four-wheel drive mechanism. It was as if the emergency brake was applied. There was no problem while driving straight ahead or when driving in 2-wheel drive. I only use 4-wheel drive when road conditions dictate. I brought the 4Runner to the dealership to have the problem checked and the mechanic told me there was nothing wrong. The technician said that is how 4 x 4 s work, power needs to be evenly distributed to all four wheels and that does not happen when making turns and/or backing up. I told him I never experienced this problem with my old 2003 and 2006 4Runners, which also required turning a dial to engage the 4-wheel drive mechanism. I have also owned other 4 x 4 makes/models and never experienced this issue with any of them. I thought maybe I was crazy, but when I mentioned the issue to friends who own 4 x 4 s, they all say it is not normal. I have read a few blogs from other Toyota 4Runner owners complaining about the same problem. Can you shed any light on this problem?

    A. The repair tech is correct that there will be a drag when driving in reverse or turning but it shouldn t be as if the parking brake were on. I have driven many Toyota products off-road and there are many instances where the vehicle needs to be in four-wheel-drive and it is necessary to back-up or take tight turns. On a dry road in four-wheel-drive you will get a sensation of crab-walking or wheel-tripping and that sensation would be normal for most any traditional the four-wheel-drive. I recently drove the 2016 Tacoma off-road and although, I could feel the four-wheel drive system on turns or in reverse there was never a sense that I needed to switch out of four wheel drive to maneuver the truck. I would return to the dealer and go for a road test on a gravel road and demonstrate your concerns.

    Related Links

    Q. I have 2015 Lexus RX 350 and want to add a trailer hitch. I don t plan on towing a trailer at this time, but plan to use the trailer hitch for a bike rack or cargo rack. I have seen trailer hitches priced from $150.00 to more the $250.00 with labor to match. Is this something I can do myself?

    Advertisement – Continue Reading Below

    A. There are several companies that make custom trailer hitches (Reese, Valley, and Draw-Tite among a few). These hitches are all pre-assembled and in the case of your Lexus would just bolt to the frame. You will need to move one exhaust hanger temporarily before you bolt the hitch in place, but this is about as complicated as it gets. With the help of a friend, the installation shouldn t take more than 60 minutes.

    Q. Last week I was driving my daughter s 2014 GM Arcadia, and I noticed it had a calibrated heat gauge, which I like. However, the engine ran at 210 degrees. My Toyota and Nissans have 180 degree thermostats and get plenty hot. I always thought that engine temperatures above 190 degrees, was the beginning of engine meltdown. Is there any issue with these high engine temperatures and engine longevity?

    A. There was a time when 160 degrees was typical of a normal operating engine, but over the years engine temperatures have gone up. Today we see most engines operating at 185-205 degrees and even higher as in the case of your GMC. These higher temperatures are accomplished with a mixture of engine coolant and system pressure. A 50/50 mix of water and coolant raises the boiling point of water to 223 degrees and for each pound of system pressure raises the temperature by 2 degrees. A system running a 16 pound radiator cap and the proper mix of coolant would raise the boiling point to 255 degrees. Even at these temperatures there will be no damage to the engine.

    Q. I have a question and a concern about driving my 2014 Toyota Camry. The first is, I worry about other drivers and how every accident seems to be a way for someone to make money. The second issue is I wish I ordered my car with navigation. Would it be possible to have an aftermarket dash cam installed to protect me if I was involved in a crash? The second question can a factory navigation system be installed in a car that didn t come with one?

    A. Yes a skilled installer at a mobile audio store could certainly do the work and the end result would most likely look similar to the factory system. They could also easily put a dash cam in place, most likely mounted near the rear view mirror and essentially out of sight. A simpler solution might be a combination GPS and dash cam. Garmin has a new product- the NUVI Cam LMT. This unit replicates some of the best features found in new cars. It uses voice commands, real time traffic updates, forward collision warning and lane departure warning systems. There is a built in dash-cam that saves video files on an impact/crash. The maps are very good and when you are approaching your destination the display switches to a camera view to easily identify the destination in real time. My only complaint with this unit is it is big. The overall dimensions are 4 inches by 7 inches and takes up a fair amount of dash/windshield real estate.

    Q. My 2005 Dodge Caravan did something weird the other day when I went to start it. After I turned the key, all the gages went to full range, fluctuated and then went back to normal. It did start and ran good the rest of the day. When I tried to start it the next day, it did the same thing. I also noticed that the red flashing security light went out and never came back on. It has been about a week now and the car starts and runs fine, what do you think caused this?

    A. This type of problem is usually related to a poor electrical connection. I would look at the main battery cables and well as all the grounding points. Some of these older Caravans also had issues with the instrument clusters. If it is the instrument cluster there is no easy repair other than replacing the circuit board on the back of the gauge cluster.



    Free-Trade Cars: Why a U. S. Europe Free-Trade Agreement Is a Good Idea – Feature – Car and Driver #cash #for #cars


    #trade cars
    #

    The United States and the European Union consider a free-trade agreement. Finally.

    cheaper cars, dirt-cheaper trucks

    The standard tariff for importing cars to the U.S. is 2.5 percent of their value. For pickup trucks and commercial vans, the tariff is a whopping 25 percent. Individual European countries don t charge import duties, but the European Union charges a flat rate of 10 percent on imported automobiles. In simple terms, tariffs are taxes. They re paid to governments by the businesses that import and export products and are factored into the prices we pay. Virtually every country in the world charges tariffs to some degree. With the proposed TTIP in place, the tariffs on cars and about a billion other products exchanged across the Atlantic would almost definitely disappear.

    revitalizing manufacturing

    ‘merica

    Suffice it to say, automakers are eager to see the TTIP enacted. The American Automotive Policy Council. which represents Chrysler, Ford, and GM, issued a statement supporting the negotiations, calling for an ambitious agreement to eliminate tariffs. Unlike NAFTA. the 1994 free-trade agreement that resulted in a rush of factory relocations to Mexico, the European-U.S. deal could very well establish the United States as a major exporter.

    A senior Volkswagen executive tells us that when Silao, Mexico, recently won out over the U.S. as the site of a new engine factory, it wasn t because of the cheaper labor. It s [Mexico s] free-trade agreement with the E.U.



    Why Ontario drivers pay the highest car insurance rates in the country – The Globe and Mail #used #car #value #calculator


    #car insurance ontario
    #

    Why Ontario drivers pay the highest car insurance rates in the country Add to.

    Nick Dasko bought his first car when he was 22 – a seven-year-old Mazda Protege that cost him $10,000. Then came the insurance bill: more than $6,000, even though he had no tickets or at-fault accidents.

    Some of his friends were paying even more – $10,000 was not unheard of.

    Auto insurance is the wild west of compulsory services. If you want to drive, you have no choice but to buy it – but what you pay varies wildly. According to quotes obtained Tuesday from kanetix.ca, a 20-year-old male in Winnipeg with a clean driving record would pay $1,396 driving a 2008 Honda Civic DX two-door coupe for pleasure (not to commute to school or work) and compiling 15,000 km/year. In Calgary, that same driver would pay between $2,973 and  $3,789. In Toronto, the bill would range from $4,239 to $9,270  – an increase of 664 per cent.

    The obvious question – why?

    While it costs more to cover claims in Ontario (the province is plagued by insurance fraud) private insurers claim that the actuarial evidence used to rate drivers shows that males under 25 have the worst statistical record as a group. Consequently, individuals in the 16-to-24 group pay more, even if they’ve never been involved in an accident or received a ticket for a traffic violation. Essentially, young men are deemed guilty until proven innocent – at age 25.

    “You are being prejudged,” says Dasko. “It’s the last legal form of discrimination.”

    Public auto insurance programs, such as those in Manitoba and Saskatchewan, take a different approach. Standard rates apply to every driver, regardless of age or gender. Auto insurance is much less expensive for a 20-year-old full-time student in Winnipeg driving the same car as his counterparts in Toronto, Montreal and Calgary.

    The private insurance industry defends the actuarial approach. “It’s not discriminatory,” says Pete Karageorgos, manager of consumer and industry relations for the Insurance Bureau of Canada. “It’s based purely on statistical analysis. It’s like charging more for house insurance in a high-risk neighbourhood. I think people have accepted this. In a public auto insurance system, young drivers are subsidized. In Ontario, young drivers pay rates that reflect their actual risk.”

    Statistics show that young drivers do cause a disproportionate amount of damage. Drivers aged 16 to 24 represent 13 per cent of the driving population, but account for 24 per cent of fatalities and 26 per cent of serious injuries. The question is whether Ontario’s steep insurance charges for young drivers accurately reflect actuarial data.

    State Farm Insurance spokesman John Bordignon says Toronto is a “special case”: “It’s got the highest population density, the worst roads, and a high rate of theft. The costs reflect those risks.”

    Contrary to the public system, in Ontario, Alberta and other provinces, every driver must help bear layers of extra costs. Ontario’s industry is made up of more than 100 private companies that are overseen by a government agency called the Financial Services Commission of Ontario. Revenue comes from two sources – insurance premiums, and the money insurers make by investing the money consumers give them.

    Private insurers say that their system has the built-in advantage of competition: “If you’re not satisfied with your insurer, you can go shop around,” says Karageorgos. “With government insurance, there’s no choice. Private insurance gives you better service.”

    Not everyone agrees. The Consumers Association of Canada (CAC) deems private auto insurance to be one of the biggest rip-offs that Canadians face. After studying the industry for years, CAC concluded that a properly run public insurance system was the best choice, but found itself locked into a debilitating public relations battle with the private industry.

    “There are some things that should be run by private industry,” says CAC president Bruce Cran. “And there are others that should be in the hands of government. Auto insurance is one of them.”

    Cran says that excessive insurance charges affect everyone, not just drivers: “The costs run through the entire economy,” he says. “Everything you buy, every last piece of bread you eat, is carried in a vehicle that has to be insured. So we all pay, whether we have a car or not.”

    The CAC’s investigation of the insurance industry yielded interesting insights into the way it operates, and why costs are so high. In 2004, for example, CAC learned that private insurers had paid $290-million in secret commissions to insurance brokers who steered business their way. This practice had a direct impact on consumers – instead of hunting for the best price for their customers, brokers sold the policy that offered them the highest commission.

    A public auto insurance system can offer fundamental business advantages. Most important, a public system reduces overhead costs – instead of multiple companies, each with its own head office, computer systems, etc. there is just one, which cuts duplication and creates efficiencies of scale.

    Other significant savings include profit margin (public insurance systems don’t have to pay dividends to shareholders) and advertising – public systems don’t have to budget for TV spots and a talking gecko. Public insurance plans can also control costs more effectively – body shops, medical clinics and towing companies must comply with rates set by the public plan, which wields monopoly power over suppliers. Ontario’s private insurers, on the other hand, face ongoing problems with gouging and fraud.

    As with U.S. health care, the debate over private and public auto insurance has been cast along ideological lines that obscure underlying economic realities. Ontario’s private insurance firms admit that rates here are the highest, yet insist that theirs is the superior business model.

    CROSS-CANADA PREMIUM QUOTES

    Using the website kanetix.ca on Tuesday, we obtained quotes for a 20-year-old full-time male student, in the 16-to-24 age group. We listed him as principal driver, clean record, living at home, using a 2008 Honda Civic DX two-door coupe for pleasure (not to commute to school or work) and compiling 15,000 km/year. Deductible was $500 for collision and comprehensive, with $1-million liability. The site harvests quotes from different companies, but those companies do not necessarily quote for all cities; the Canadian Automobile Association does not sell service in Montreal. The Manitoba rate was obtained directly from a dedicated website. *Kanetix provides a “lowest rate” but does not identify it until the consumer calls for a quote.



    Why Should Drivers Compare Insurance Companies #japanese #used #cars


    #car insurance companies
    #

    Why Should Drivers Compare Insurance Companies?

    As a college Professor of Insurance, I have noticed that when college students take that important step into independence and start paying for their own car insurance, most of them continue buying car insurance from the same company their parents used.   Many times their parents have been insured by this company since they became drivers too. It never occurs to these students (or their parents) that all insured drivers should “shop around” for affordable car insurance.  Maybe they assume that every insurance company charges the same rate for the same risk, and maybe they believe that all insurance coverage is essentially the same.  But neither of these assumptions is true.  In fact, two different insurance companies can and often do price their insurance policies very differently for the same driver.

    So how do insurance companies decide how much to charge for the insurance policies they sell?   Unfortunately there is no way around it: it’s complicated!  Specialized professionals known as insurance actuaries spend many years studying actuarial science to learn how to “price” insurance policies.  Actuaries use mountains of statistical data to determine the prices for insurance policies.  This data includes internal company information, such as the number and types of customers an insurance company currently insures, as well as external data, such as accident risk for a specific vehicle or theft risk for a particular zip code.

    But you don’t have to be an insurance actuary to see that insurance rates do vary from company to company.  If you don’t already “shop around” for insurance, this article will hopefully encourage you to begin the process and equip you with information that will help you make the best decisions to meet your car insurance needs.

    First, think about what insurance companies are actually selling.  They sell a “promise to pay” in the event of a covered loss.  That means that, up-front, they are not selling anything of value other than their promise.  It also means that, other than some up-front labor and overhead costs, they don’t know how much this promise is going to eventually cost them.  It just depends on the amount of covered losses they end up paying, which they sometimes pay many years after they collect the premium.

    So how do they decide what to charge? To put it simply, insurance companies base their price or “rates” on past losses and on how they expect those losses to change going forward.  So, if two companies are trying to price insurance for the same “risk”, i.e. driver, why would they the risk a different rate?”

    There are two primary reasons insurance rates vary from company to company:

    1. Different appetites for risk
    2. Different levels of service and claims payments

    Different Appetites for Risk

    Yes, that’s correct, different insurance companies have different appetites for risk, much like different people have different appetites for where they invest their money. One person might choose to invest in high-risk technology stocks while another might prefer to invest low-risk municipal bonds.  For insurance companies, their appetites for risk are frequently dependent on their need to accomplish two sometimes conflicting goals: marketing and diversification.

    Marketing: Insurers might price products more competitively, i.e. charge less for a policy, when they want to leverage a certain marketing tool they have in place.  For example, a company might have an agency force or other marketing mechanism that is geared particularly well to selling insurance to older drivers.  So in order to further support their advantage in marketing, they might charge less than their competition to older drivers while they charge more to younger drivers.

    Diversification: Conversely, an insurer might decide they have too much of a concentration in their book of business of a particular type of insured (e.g. maybe older drivers) so they lower their rates for younger drivers and raise rates for older drivers.  By doing this they hope to attract more younger drivers and develop a book of business (a group of insureds) that is more balanced.

    Below are 10 ways insurance company rates commonly differ and some examples of those differences:

    1. Age – Some companies are more competitive with younger drivers than others
    2. Credit score – While most companies today do use credit score as a rating factor for auto insurance, some are more forgiving than others of low credit scores for certain reasons like divorce or age
    3. Location –  Some insurers prefer city drivers while others might want more rural drivers; also, if an insurance company has a very geographic concentration of insured drivers that exposes them to catastrophic loss, they might begin to price higher in those areas than other insurers
    4. Some reward persistence – With some insurance companies, rates go down the longer you are with the company; other insurance companies try to draw new business with rate discounts
    5. Education and military service – Some insurers offer discounts for good students and for military personnel
    6. Loss history – Nearly all insurers increase their rates for drivers with a loss history, but some have more generous good driver discounts while others are more forgiving of a poor accident history
    7. Type of car – Some insurers do not penalize significantly for driving a sports car. but some insurers will price them higher
    8. Work or pleasure – Some insurers prefer work commuters; others prefer those who drive more for pleasure
    9. Male or female drivers – If an insurance company finds they have an abundance of male drivers, they might raise rates (even more) on male drivers and lower them on female drivers to even out their mix of business
    10. Multiple policy discounts – Some insurance want to sell you their life, health and homeowners insurance along with your auto insurance, while others are only selling auto insurance

    Claims/Service Differences

    To some extent, the old adage “you get what you pay for” is true even with insurance.  If the insurance is “cheap”, there is a chance that the insurance company is more stringent when it comes to paying claims and not as good at providing service.  Some insurers have a tendency to pay lower claims amounts or to fight questionable claims more aggressively.

    When an insurance company fights truly fraudulent claims, this is not a bad thing for honest policyholders because it keeps the cost of insurance down in the long run.  But some companies have a reputation for taking longer to pay legitimate claims and generally making the claims process difficult.  This might be because they are understaffed or because they simply hope that policyholders will accept lower claims payments if the process has been tedious for them.

    The best way to find out whether a company has good claims service (as well as other services) is to ask others who have had a claims experience with the company.  Tell coworkers, neighbors, family and friends that you are thinking about switching your car insurance and ask them to talk about their experience with their insurance company, particularly if you know they have had a claims experience.

    Many states’ Departments of Insurance can tell you which companies have received the highest level of complaints and sometimes even about the nature of those complaints against the company.  A link to your state’s insurance department website can be found at the National Association of Insurance Commissioners website at http://www.naic.org/state_web_map.htm .

    In general, large, multi-line national companies tend to reward persistence and good driving records.  They tend to be more conservative in the types of risks they take on but better at service and often more generous with claims payments.  But there are exceptions, so it is best to shop around and ask around to find the best company for the best price for you!

    By the way, if you have a complaint against an insurer’s or agent’s handling of a claim or any other service they provided, go to https://eapps.naic.org/cis/fileComplaintMap.do for a map that will take you directly to your state’s complaint filing department.  Most states allow you to file the complaint electronically.  This will help others like you when they are trying to decide which company is the most appropriate for their insurance needs.

    Car Insurance List can be a great resource for comparing different insurance options. To request a car insurance quote, you only need some basic personal and vehicle data and your zip code. You ll find also comparisons and car insurance reviews of some of the leading carriers in the country, as well as tips for finding affordable car insurance, industry news. and state-by-state information on auto insurance requirements and statistics.

    Dr. Christine Berry is a Professor of Insurance and a widely published insurance expert .