Transamerica Medicare Supplement Review #which #medicare #supplement #is #best


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Transamerica Medicare Supplement Review

Company Background

Transamerica Insurance Company and has been providing insurance products since 1900. They are licensed in all states except New York and the District of Columbia. Transamerica maintains A.M.s Best rating of A+ through their parent company Transamerica. Transamerica offers Medicare supplement plans A, F. G and N in 19 U.S. states. Medicare Supplement plans are offered through Transamerica Premier Life Insurance Company, a subsidiary of Transamerica.

In July of 2015 Stonebridge Life announced they were transferring all Medicare supplement policies to Transamerica Premier Life. Stonebridge Medicare supplements are no longer marketing under the name Stonebridge but under Transamerica Premier Life. Rates remain competitive in most states across the United States. Transamerica offers Medicare supplement plans F, G, and N among other plans.

Medicare Supplement Plans Offered By Transamerica

Medigap plans are designed to pay the gaps that Medicare doesn t cover in full. Medicare pays about 80%, leaving 20% leftover. With the right Medicare Supplement plan, you will have very little out-of-pocket cost. The chart below highlights the most popular Medicare supplement programs; F, G N. With these plans you can see any doctor or hospital in the country that accepts Medicare. No referrals are needed.

Prices range depending on your location, age, and gender. Transamerica tends to be very competitive in many states across the country. Contact us at (800) 208-4974 for a free rate comparison to find out what companies have the best rates in your area.

Our Professional Opinion

As of January 2017, we recommend Transamerica as a carrier for your Medicare Supplement insurance. Recent rate adjustments from Transamerica are favorable and show they are a reliable, stable option for Medicare Supplement insurance. They have an easy electronic application process and can issue policies in just a few days.

Contact us at (800) 208-4974 or request a free quote. We would love to help guide you in your choice for a Medicare supplement plan.

Transamerica Medicare Supplement Review

Which car insurance comparison site is best? #japanese #car #imports


#car insurance comparison sites
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Which car insurance comparison site is the best?

Published: 18 December 2008 Topic: News,Insurance,Motoring,Car,Car Insurance

Comparison sites are a great way of getting a better deal on all your finances. Independent consumer champion and and freelance journalist, Mike Naylor, reviews six of the biggest car insurance comparison websites and shares his opinion.

Comparison sites are a great way of getting a better deal on all your finances. Car insurance comparison sites save you the hassle of entering your details over and over again on numerous insurance company sites and can quickly help you save money on your insurance. However, no single site covers the whole market and some are better than others. Here we review six of the biggest car insurance comparison sites.

We reviewed beatthatquote, comparethemarket, confused, Gocompare, moneysupermarket and Tescocompare to assess how good they are, taking into account ease of use; appearance; the number of providers included in searches; accuracy of quotes; cheapest premium; the usefulness of the results and their comparison tools.

The best site overall was moneysupermarket.com. Along with comparethemarket, and Gocompare it compares prices from more than 80 providers. Moneysupermarket’s car insurance search is not the best looking, but the results were accurate and it is very easy to compare policies. You can also re-quote without having to enter all your details again. Its price promise means that you won’t get a cheaper quote by going direct to any of the companies it get quotes from. It also includes customer ratings and you can opt out of being contacted by third parties, unlike some other comparison sites.

Gocompare and Tescocompare came second overall. Gocompare searches the highest number of providers – 90 in total – looks good and is easy to use. It lets you opt-out of contact from third parties and came second on price with Tescocompare. Gocompare uses star ratings which enable you to specify any particular features you need, such as a courtesy car. It also shows you how closely each policy matches your requirements. Tescocompare compares quotes from the fewest providers, although it asks the most questions to get to the results. That said the site looks good and is very easy to use. Like moneysupermarket, it has a price promise and as with Gocompare and moneysupermarket.com you can compare policies easily.

We used all the sites to compare prices for a single scenario (see below for details). Moneysupermarket.com was the cheapest, marginally, with a quote of 208 from Lloyds TSB, followed by Confused, Gocompare and Tesco all of which came back with quotes of 209, also from Lloyds TSB. The cheapest premium available through beatthatquote and Comparethemarket was from Ibuyeco at 217.

Once you get your results all but Beatthatquote let you compare 4 or 5 policies side by side. This can be a good way of comparing policy excesses and features. Comparethemarket and moneysupermarket.com also let you re-quote without entering your details again.

Comparison sites receive a commission from the insurance company or broker you buy your insurance from. None of the sites were very clear about this. Also not all insurers are included on comparison sites, so you may need to go direct to some insurers to get quotes.

Sites compared – scores

Beatthatquote – 1 star

Beatthatquote was let down by its lack of comparison tools. It also automatically sends on your details to third parties and does not let you opt-out of this. It’s coverage is less than average with 50 companies included in searches. It also gave the most expensive quote initially of the six we looked at.

Comparethemarket – 2 stars

Comparethemarket looks good and was easy to use. However it’s not clear how many companies it includes in the search as it states it includes,’400 car insurance prices from the top providers’. Its search results are limited initially – only showing the price, but this can be expanded to show more details of what the policy covers. Like moneysupermarket.com it lets you re-quote without entering all your details again. However the price it quoted in the results was cheaper than on the insurer’s site. You can opt-out of contact from third parties, but this isn’t as easy to find as it could be.


Which New Car is Best For You? #japanese #car #imports


#which car
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Which Car is Best for You?

By Philip Powell

Aaron Gold, About.com s Cars Expert, has been an automotive journalist for a decade and a half and has been writing for About.com since 2004. He contributes to several automotive publications and is a member of the North American Car and Truck of the Year jury.

Continue Reading Below

But there are three simple tests you can administer yourself which, if answered properly, will make the task easier.

Test # 1 Lifestyle:

This is about your status in life; single, married, children. It s about where you live; in the city or suburbs, or a decidedly rural area. It s about your activities, your hobbies, your work. And of course, it s about your income. We suggest you sit down, and with pen and paper in hand, analyse your personal lifestyle. Be honest, painful though that may be. When you ve finished, write down your needs.

And don t get hung up on design or performance or whatever your wise uncle recommends. The objective here is to define your new vehicle solely in terms of function. In simple terms: What should this new vehicle do for me? What will be its mission?

Test # 2 Driving style:

Okay, those who regard a car as an appliance and consider driving as exciting as lawn bowling, may want to tune out. Please don t. Everyone who sits behind the wheel of a moving vehicle has a personal driving style, whether they realise it or not.

Continue Reading Below

For example, do you enjoy driving, or is it a painful necessity? Like the slam-in-the-back feel of power? If the road twists and turns, rises and falls, is that a challenge, or merely something to endure until the next arrow-straight highway appears? How important is performance? Or economy? Answer those questions honestly and you ve established your style and from that, your needs as a driver.

Test #3 Choosing the Options:

Wise buyers will already know how much engine is enough. Modern 4-cylinder engines, for example, are remarkably powerful, with smoothness to match. And they can cut fuel and maintenance bills substantially over the life of the vehicle. Some of the newest V-6 engines are capable of outperforming yesterday s V-8 s. Our motto: Never buy more horses than you really need. With most people opting for automatics, the choice of transmission may appear irrelevant. But if you enjoy operating clutch and gears with precision, a manual will be more fun and save cash in fuel expenses. It should be pointed out though, that today s automatics are far more efficient than they once were and as 5-speed automatics or gearless CVTs filter down to the lower end of the market, a manual is redundant except for hard-core enthusiasts.

What about design as a factor in decision-making? Fashion can be fleeting, my friend. Manufacturers design their cars to attract buyers, then initiate changes that make yesterday s beauty appear outdated. Our advice: unless you can afford to replace your car every three or four years the safest route is to avoid vehicles with exaggerated lines or trendy shapes.

Selecting features and options is not made easier by the vast number of technological advances in today s automobiles. Some, such as ABS brakes and traction and stability control, are major contributors to safety. Others qualify as luxuries that are nice if you can afford them, but not essential to everyday driving. Our advice is to research this aspect of car shopping very thoroughly before visiting a dealer (test drive reviews are good sources of information; so is the manufacturer s catalog if you ignore the hype). Salespeople are understandably eager to sell profit-making options so before you buy, be absolutely certain you know what features you want, then refuse to budge.

Once you ve done your homework, it s simply a matter of deciding which body type or vehicle category best suits your lifestyle (by which we mean coupe or sedan, hatchback or station wagon, SUV, or perhaps a crossover vehicle), then making a few decisions about performance, price, and options. Consider advice from friends or relatives if you must, but don t be dissuaded. It s your lifestyle, your life, and your new car.


Rental Car Insurance: Which Credit Cards Have You Covered #trade #in #value #car


#car rental insurance
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More from the nerds

NerdWallet

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The results of our “card comparison and finder tool”, card assessments, and reviews are based on objective quantitative and qualitative analysis of card attributes. They are not affected by compensation.

Compensation may impact which cards we review and write about and how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear).

While we try to feature as many credit cards offers on our site as we can maintain (1,700+ and counting!), we recognize that our site does not feature every card company or card available on the market.

Additionally, our star ratings are a mix of user feedback and NerdWallet’s independent evaluation which are independent of compensation.

For a list of all of our advertising partners, click here

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Rental Car Insurance: Which Credit Cards Have You Covered

You can trust that we maintain strict editorial integrity in our writing and assessments; however, we receive compensation when you click on links to products from our partners and get approved. Here’s how we make money .

The question arises every time you rent a car: Do I really need rental car insurance ?

Many rental agencies offer damage waivers for about $15 to $25 a day, selling peace of mind along with expanded coverage. But these waivers are often no better than the coverage you already have with your favorite credit card.

Depending on where you rent, the rental company’s liability for injury or property damage may be anywhere from $25,000 to $50,000. This could still leave a big bill for you to pay, but your credit card may also step in sort of. All four major card networks offer rental insurance, but vary substantially in benefits and requirements.

In some cases, car-rental customers may want to purchase full coverage from the car-rental company to avoid the hassle of making a claim or reporting an accident to their primary insurer and  the credit card issuer. Make sure you re comfortable with that process before relying on your credit card s secondary coverage.

You can also get primary coverage for your car rentals with these two credit cards:


Which companies offer pay-per-mile auto insurance? #car #prices


#pay as you go car insurance
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Pay-per-mile car insurance

Got a car that sits in the garage most days? There are three ways to get a low-mileage discount that will give you cheaper car insurance :

Low-mileage discount

A traditional low-mileage discount offers a break to drivers who rack up annual mileage under a certain threshold, such as 7,000 miles a year. In most states, according to data gathered for Insurance.com by Quadrant Information Services, the discount cuts the rates on a full-coverage policy by an average of 2 percent. (The savings are much bigger in California because of that state’s laws.)

Companies may require periodic or annual verification of your odometer reading. Some may send you a form to fill in and may match your estimate against third-party readings taken from public sources. Others may ask an agent to verify the reading, or for you to take a photo.

Pay-as-you-drive

Pay-as-you-drive models such as Snapshot and In-Drive use a telematics device to monitor your car, offer a potentially larger discount for people who drive less and very carefully. Ultra-cautious low-mileage drivers can save 30 percent or even more, but most drivers save less than that.

Most of these pay-as-you-drive programs offer a discount of 5 to 10 percent when you enroll, then use the data gathered to calculate a discount at your next renewal period. (See “Pay-as-you-drive discounts: A guide .”)

Pay-per-mile car insurance

Insurance by the mile bills you monthly based on how much you drive. Only one company currently offers pure pay-per-mile coverage, and it estimates potential savings at 40 to 50 percent for those who drive less than 5,000 miles a year.

You get the same types of car insurance under each plan; instead of cutting coverage to save money, you’re limiting the amount of risk the insurance company faces when you hit the road.

MetroMile. a company that specializes in pay-per-mile policies, pitches its policies to urban residents who don’t drive much, especially millennials who have vehicles but often look for alternative transportation, from taking buses and subways to ride-sharing and cycling.

CEO Dan Preston says his company s model is simple: The less you drive, the less you pay.

MetroMile follows the same general technology of Progressive’s Snapshot, the best-known pay-as-you-go program. You stick a telematics device into the vehicle’s onboard diagnostics (OBDII) port in the hope of getting a discount. Most cars from 1996 and later have an OBDII port.

The MetroMile Metronome device then tracks your mileage, which is used to set your rates.

Customers are charged a base monthly rate determined by individual rating factors: the driver s age and location, driving record, type of car and, in some states, credit and insurance history. At the end of the month, the driver pays the base rate plus a per-mile fee based on the miles reported through the Metronome.

The per-mile fee tops out at 150 miles a day (250 in Washington state, making allowances for the occasional long trip.

The company is currently offering policies in California, Illinois, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Virginia and Washington.

Esurance. an Allstate company, has begun testing its own pay-per-mile offering. Esurance Pay Per Mile launched in October 2015, offering customers the chance to track their driving — and, with any luck, cut their monthly bills — via a small on-board device that sends drivers’ mileage data to Esurance.

Eric Madia, auto products vice president at Esurance, said the company’s pay-per-mile offering is meant to appeal to consumers who have flexible commuting options and consequently put fewer miles on their cars.

“With Esurance Pay Per Mile, our customers will pay largely based on how many miles they drive, whether that’s 1,000 or 10,000 miles per year,” Madia said in a written statement.

As of this writing, Esurance Pay Per Mile is available only in Oregon.

How is MetroMile different from Snapshot?

Progressive. Allstate and others who offer pay-as-you-go telematics-based discounts track mileage but also use their devices to monitor how carefully you drive. Hard braking is a big factor, and so is the time of day that you drive late nights or heavy rush-hours could ding you. A few companies look at outright speed, but only ding you if you go faster than 80.

At renewal time, you get a discount off standard rates based on the company s scoring system.

Drivers who pose the least risk save the most, says Des Toups, Insurance.com managing editor. Pay-per-mile and pay-as-you-go programs are a way for insurance companies to seek out lower-risk drivers.

For example, a 40-year-old man with a clean driving record buying full coverage for a 2014 Honda Accord in Camas, Washington, could pay as little as $907 a year for a traditional non-telematics policy, according to a Quadrant Information Services survey of major carriers. The same driver would pay MetroMile, by its own estimate, $24.18 a month for his base rate plus 3.2 cents each mile. At 12,000 miles a year, the cost would be $674; at 5,000 miles, the cost would be $450.

The cheapest traditional policy for the same Washington driver with a DUI conviction is $1,230 a year, the Quadrant survey finds. MetroMile estimates his rates at $1,056 a year for 12,000 miles and $884 for 5,000 miles.

Not first with the mile model

MetroMile isn’t the first to offer car insurance tied solely to mileage. MileMeter, which was based in Dallas, is considered the first, but it closed operations in 2012, citing overwhelming competition from the major insurers and not enough funding to continue. Chris Gay, the entrepreneur behind MileMeter, stressed at the time that the per-mile model was sound and should eventually find a place in the insurance landscape, despite challenges by bigger companies.

That inroad may be the smartphone.

Metronome, which is GPS-equipped, also communicates with a MetroMile app you install in a smartphone. The app reads your car’s diagnostic information and can relay your miles per gallon, how much the gas costs, how long you were driving and other weekly statistics. Preston adds that, over time, the app can track common routes and tell users which paths may be less congested, which saves the driver gas money.

The app can also alert customers if street-sweeping is scheduled in their neighborhood. The company says it has sent more than 18,000 of these alerts so far to motorists in San Francisco and Chicago.


Which Culinary Colleges are in the Las Vegas, Nevada Area? #which #culinary #colleges #are #in #the #las #vegas, #nevada #area?


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Which Culinary Colleges Are in the Las Vegas, Nevada Area?

Learn about culinary colleges in Las Vegas, Nevada. See degree levels and specialization options, program requirements and examples of common courses. Schools offering Baking & Pastry degrees can also be found in these popular choices.

The College of Southern Nevada offers both certificate programs and associate’s degree programs in culinary arts, and the bachelor’s degree program at the University of Nevada at Las Vegas will train you in Culinary Arts Management. This article presents information on each of these options in the Las Vegas, Nevada area.

What You Need to Know

Culinary programs may be found at several 4-year colleges in Las Vegas. You might earn a certificate in culinary arts by completing 31 credits or an associate’s degree in 2 years. A 4-year bachelor’s degree is also offered in culinary arts management. The following programs are hands-on and can prepare you for entry-level employment. Read on to learn more program details.

Certificate Programs in Culinary Arts near Las Vegas, Nevada

College of Southern Nevada

One of the programs you could enroll in at the College of Southern Nevada (CSN) is the certificate program in culinary arts. CSN maintains relationships with several local hotel and restaurant organizations, such as the Nevada Restaurant Association. These businesses can provide you with opportunities to complete cooperative internships.

  • Program Name: Certificate of Achievement in Culinary Arts
  • Program Length: 31 credits
  • Tuition: $2,805 per year for residents, $9,450 for non-residents, including fees (cost for 2015-2016)
  • School Type: 4-year, public; about 35,900 students (all undergraduate)

Associate’s Degree Programs in Culinary Arts in Las Vegas, Nevada

College of Southern Nevada

If you’re looking for a slightly more advanced culinary arts program, this college also features an associate’s degree program that can help you acquire professional-level skills in the kitchen. You’ll take classes that cover aromatics, restaurant management, food service sanitation, menu planning, food and beverage control, nutrition and hospitality purchasing. Your coursework will combine classroom instruction with kitchen training. The school also offers an associate’s degree program in culinary arts management, which – compared to the associate’s degree program in culinary arts – requires fewer course credits and provides less in-depth culinary training.

  • Program Name: Associate of Applied Science in Culinary Arts
  • Program Length: Two years
  • Tuition: $2,805 per year for residents, $9,450 for non-residents, including fees (cost for 2015-2016)
  • School Type: 4-year, public; about 35,900 students (all undergraduate)

Bachelor’s Degree Programs in Culinary Arts in Las Vegas, Nevada

University of Nevada at Las Vegas

The University of Nevada at Las Vegas offers a Bachelor of Science (B.S.) in Culinary Arts Management. The B.S. program combines general education classes with cooking theory and hands-on culinary training. Upon graduation, you could be eligible for entry-level positions in restaurants. Some of the classes you could take include basic cooking, baking, garden manager principles, and sauces.

  • Program Name: Bachelor of Science (B.S.) in Culinary Arts Management
  • Program Length: Four years
  • Tuition: $6,943 per year for residents, $20,853 for residents, including fees (2015-2016)
  • School Type: 4-year, public; about 23,800 undergraduates, and 4,700 graduate students

In summary, it is possible to gain culinary arts education through a certificate, associate’s degree, or bachelor’s degree program from various institutions in the Las Vegas area.

To continue researching, browse degree options below for course curriculum, prerequisites and financial aid information. Or, learn more about the subject by reading the related articles below:

The schools in the listing below are not free and may include sponsored content but are popular choices among our users. Tuition and costs will vary across programs and locations. Be sure to always request tuition information before starting a program.


7 Types of Car Insurance: Which Ones Do You Really Need? #nada #car #value


#car insurances
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7 Types of Car Insurance: Which Ones Do You Really Need?

The cost of even a small repair makes car insurance nice to have. When we start adding in the medical expenses that can go with a car accident, insurance becomes downright necessary. In many states, insurance is even a legal requirement before you can drive your car out on the road. But a wide variety of options are available when it comes to insurance there are actually seven different types of car insurance you can choose from in most cases and it can be difficult to decide just what type of auto insurance is the best choice for you, your vehicle and your budget. Here is a list of the seven types and what you need to know about each one.

1. Liability Insurance

When your state requires that you carry some sort of insurance for your car, they re usually looking for liability insurance. In the event that you are in a car accident and the police decide it is your fault, liability insurance covers the cost of repairing any property damaged in the crash (such as cars or buildings), as well as the medical bills from resulting injuries. Most states have a minimum requirement for liability insurance coverage that you absolutely must have.

However, it usually makes sense to go beyond that minimum requirement if you can afford the payment. That s because you are personally responsible for any claims that exceed your coverage s upper limit. In the event that you are in an accident, you don t want to run the risk of having to pay a significant amount of money out of your own pocket. How much liability insurance you need depends on whether you have a lot of assets to protect, as it is more important to have higher levels of coverage just in case of a catastrophe.

2. Collision Insurance

The biggest problem with carrying only liability insurance is that if there is an accident, you may wind up without the money to repair your own vehicle. A collision insurance policy makes it so that someone else — your insurer — will pay for the repairs to your car. If your car is totaled in an accident, a collision insurance policy will pay out the value of your car. While the payout won t cover for a brand new vehicle, the sum will equal approximately what the car was worth before the accident.

Collision insurance isn t a must-have, as far as insurance goes. If your car is older, it may not be worth paying for insurance, especially if you can work on saving up enough to replace the car if necessary. If you have a good-sized emergency fund. you may be safe without collision insurance. If you ve chosen a more expensive car or your car is relatively new, however, collision insurance can help you sleep much better at night.

3. Comprehensive Insurance

Liability and collision insurance policies exclusively cover car accidents. If something else happens to your car weather damage, theft, an animal collision you won t be able to get your insurance company to address the problem. With a comprehensive insurance policy, however, your insurer will handle just about any situation that comes up.

A comprehensive insurance policy is one of those things that are nice to have. However, coverage can be pricey and may not be worthwhile if your car would be relatively easy for you to replace, if you had to. Note though that you can bring down the price of this policy if your vehicle has an anti-theft and tracking devices installed.

4. Uninsured Motorist Protection

Just because the law requires everyone to have insurance doesn t actually mean that s the way things work out. Even if a driver has a liability insurance policy, most states have relatively low minimums that may not cover all of the expenses that can go along with an accident. One of the worst things that can happen is that you get stuck with the bills in an accident that wasn t even your fault.

The decision to get a policy that covers damage by an uninsured motorist isn t as clear cut as other policies. In theory, even if a driver doesn t have enough insurance to cover damages during an accident, he will still have an obligation to cover the costs out of pocket. It s only when the person at fault doesn t have any money that there can be problems.

5. Medical / Personal-Injury Protection

The costs associated with treating injuries after a car accident can be astronomical. In order to cover those costs, medical and personal-injury protection is available. No matter who is at fault, such protection will cover your medical bills along with those of your passengers.

If you have a good health insurance plan. however, it s far less likely that medical and personal-injury protection will be useful to you. And considering how much more a general health insurance policy covers, it should be your first choice.

6. No-Fault Insurance

So far, no-fault insurance is available in twelve states. This option covers injuries and property damage, no matter who is ultimately responsible for a given accident. The decision to choose no-fault insurance really depends on what other insurance options are available to you and at what price. Some no-fault policies can be expensive, making it more cost-effective to choose other options, especially if your car is inexpensive to replace.

7. Gap Insurance

If you are still making car payments, gap insurance may be a good choice. It s meant for drivers who still owe money on their cars and need to pay off the vehicle if it is totaled in an accident. It s generally a good choice if you owe more on your car than you could easily pay off on short notice.

Gap insurance is especially worthwhile if you owe more on the car than you could get for it if you sold it today, since many insurance policies will only cover the value of the car, rather than the cost to replace it. Some lenders may require you to have gap insurance or something similar until you pay off the vehicle, so you may already have it whether you know it or not.


Which cars come with all-wheel drive? #auto #traders


#4 wheel drive cars
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Which cars come with all-wheel drive?

Which cars — not SUVs or crossovers — are available with all-wheel drive?

We’ve updated this list with new 2009 and 2010 cars with all-wheel drive. Some models have lost all-wheel drive for 2009, including the Dodge Avenger, Dodge Caliber and Chrysler Sebring, while others have gained the feature like the 2009 Acura TL.

Cars — not trucks, SUVs or crossovers — with all-wheel drive range from the $16,439 Suzuki SX4 hatchback up to a $354,000 Lamborghini Murcielago. We’d guess you’re looking for something a little less exotic than a 640-horsepower, two-seat roadster. If you’re not, then the Murcielago is OK in our book.

The following are available new cars that have all-wheel drive. For a complete list with more trim levels, use our Vehicle Recommender and search for cars and all-wheel drive; the results page will have links to each car’s vehicle page, where you can find prices, photos, colors and ownership costs.

Update: You can find a list of 2011 models here .

$10,000 to $20,000

  • 2009 Suzuki SX4 — $16,439
  • 2009 Subaru Impreza — $17,495
  • 2009 Subaru Impreza Outback Sport — $19,995

$20,000 to $30,000

  • 2010 Pontiac Vibe — 20,275
  • 2009 Pontiac Vibe — $20,475
  • 2009 Toyota Matrix — $20,500
  • 2010 Toyota Matrix — $20,760
  • 2009 Subaru Legacy — $20,795
  • 2009 Subaru Outback — $22,295
  • 2009 Ford Fusion — $24,345
  • 2009 Mercury Milan — $24,845
  • 2009 Mitsubishi Lancer Ralliart — $26,490
  • 2009 Mercury Sable — $26,970
  • 2010 Ford Fusion — $27,435
  • 2010 Mercury Milan —$27,800
  • 2009 Ford Taurus — $28,520
  • 2010 Ford Taurus —$29,020
  • 2009 Dodge Charger — $29,790

$30,000 to $40,000

  • 2009 Audi A3 — $30,500
  • 2010 Buick LaCrosse — $31,820
  • 2009 Audi A4 — $31,850
  • 2009 Chrysler 300 — $32,100
  • 2009 Ford Taurus — $32,520
  • 2010 Ford Taurus — $33,020
  • 2009 Volvo S40 — $33,800
  • 2009 Dodge Charger — $34,260
  • 2009 Lincoln MKZ — $34,585
  • 2009 Volvo S60 — $34,600
  • 2009 Lexus IS 250 — $34,785
  • 2009 Volvo V50 — $35,500
  • 2009 BMW 328 — $35,600
  • 2009 Infiniti G37x — $35,750
  • 2010 Lincoln MKZ — $36,005
  • 2009 Mercedes-Benz C-Class — $36,200
  • 2009 Saab 9-3 — $36,395
  • 2009 Volvo XC70 — $37,250
  • 2009 Audi TT — $37,300
  • 2009 Acura TL— $38,505
  • 2009 Chrysler 300C — $39,175
  • 2009 Cadillac CTS — $39,760
  • 2009 Volkswagen CC — $39,800

$40,000 to $50,000

  • 2009 Lincoln MKS — $40,380
  • 2009 Audi A5 — $40,700
  • 2009 Volvo S80 — $42,050
  • 2009 BMW 335 — $42,300
  • 2009 Acura RL — $46,680
  • 2009 Lexus GS 350 — $46,800
  • 2009 Infiniti M35x — $47,950
  • 2009 BMW 528 — $48,100
  • 2009 Cadillac STS — $48,745

$50,000 to $60,000

  • 2009 Audi A6 — $50,100
  • 2009 Mercedes-Benz E-Class — $53,200
  • 2009 BMW 535 — $53,400
  • 2009 Infiniti M45x — $54,650

$60,000 to $70,000

  • 2009 Lexus LS 460 — $67,200

$70,000 to $80,000

  • 2009 Audi A8 — $74,050
  • 2009 Audi S6 — $75,900
  • 2009 Nissan GT-R — $76,840

$80,000 and beyond

  • 2009 Porsche 911 — $81,700
  • 2009 Mercedes-Benz S-Class — $92,350
  • 2009 Audi S8 — $96,200
  • 2009 Lexus LS 600h — $105,885
  • 2009 Mercedes-Benz CL550 — 107,900
  • 2009 Audi R8 — $114,200
  • 2009 Bentley Continental Flying Spur — $174,100
  • 2009 Bentley Continental GT — $179,200
  • 2009 Bentley Continental GTC – $197,500
  • 2009 Lamborghini Gallardo — $198,000
  • 2009 Lamborghini Murcielago — $354,000

    Which New Car is Best For You? #cars #dealers


    #which car
    #

    Which Car is Best for You?

    By Philip Powell

    Aaron Gold, About.com s Cars Expert, has been an automotive journalist for a decade and a half and has been writing for About.com since 2004. He contributes to several automotive publications and is a member of the North American Car and Truck of the Year jury.

    Continue Reading Below

    But there are three simple tests you can administer yourself which, if answered properly, will make the task easier.

    Test # 1 Lifestyle:

    This is about your status in life; single, married, children. It s about where you live; in the city or suburbs, or a decidedly rural area. It s about your activities, your hobbies, your work. And of course, it s about your income. We suggest you sit down, and with pen and paper in hand, analyse your personal lifestyle. Be honest, painful though that may be. When you ve finished, write down your needs.

    And don t get hung up on design or performance or whatever your wise uncle recommends. The objective here is to define your new vehicle solely in terms of function. In simple terms: What should this new vehicle do for me? What will be its mission?

    Test # 2 Driving style:

    Okay, those who regard a car as an appliance and consider driving as exciting as lawn bowling, may want to tune out. Please don t. Everyone who sits behind the wheel of a moving vehicle has a personal driving style, whether they realise it or not.

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    For example, do you enjoy driving, or is it a painful necessity? Like the slam-in-the-back feel of power? If the road twists and turns, rises and falls, is that a challenge, or merely something to endure until the next arrow-straight highway appears? How important is performance? Or economy? Answer those questions honestly and you ve established your style and from that, your needs as a driver.

    Test #3 Choosing the Options:

    Wise buyers will already know how much engine is enough. Modern 4-cylinder engines, for example, are remarkably powerful, with smoothness to match. And they can cut fuel and maintenance bills substantially over the life of the vehicle. Some of the newest V-6 engines are capable of outperforming yesterday s V-8 s. Our motto: Never buy more horses than you really need. With most people opting for automatics, the choice of transmission may appear irrelevant. But if you enjoy operating clutch and gears with precision, a manual will be more fun and save cash in fuel expenses. It should be pointed out though, that today s automatics are far more efficient than they once were and as 5-speed automatics or gearless CVTs filter down to the lower end of the market, a manual is redundant except for hard-core enthusiasts.

    What about design as a factor in decision-making? Fashion can be fleeting, my friend. Manufacturers design their cars to attract buyers, then initiate changes that make yesterday s beauty appear outdated. Our advice: unless you can afford to replace your car every three or four years the safest route is to avoid vehicles with exaggerated lines or trendy shapes.

    Selecting features and options is not made easier by the vast number of technological advances in today s automobiles. Some, such as ABS brakes and traction and stability control, are major contributors to safety. Others qualify as luxuries that are nice if you can afford them, but not essential to everyday driving. Our advice is to research this aspect of car shopping very thoroughly before visiting a dealer (test drive reviews are good sources of information; so is the manufacturer s catalog if you ignore the hype). Salespeople are understandably eager to sell profit-making options so before you buy, be absolutely certain you know what features you want, then refuse to budge.

    Once you ve done your homework, it s simply a matter of deciding which body type or vehicle category best suits your lifestyle (by which we mean coupe or sedan, hatchback or station wagon, SUV, or perhaps a crossover vehicle), then making a few decisions about performance, price, and options. Consider advice from friends or relatives if you must, but don t be dissuaded. It s your lifestyle, your life, and your new car.