How To Trade In a Car That You Still Owe Money On – or That Has a Payoff! #car #hire #orlando


#trade in your car
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How To Trade In a Car That You Still Owe Money On,

or That Has a Payoff!

Many people get thrown for a loop when it comes time to trade in a vehicle with an outstanding loan payoff on it. Car dealers are very familiar with how to take trades with money owed on them, but often, when they try to explain the process the customer gets more confused then when they started!

Here’s How It Works:

You take the selling price of the vehicle you’re buying, add tax and title fees, subtract your trade-in allowance, then add your payoff to the total. This gives you your total amount due. Subtract from that any cash down and/or rebates and you have the amount to be financed on the new loan.

The payoff has to be paid off in order for the dealer to get a clear title to your trade. In essence, when you trade a car to a dealer you are really selling it to them. You can’t sell a car without providing a clear title. By a clear title I mean a title that is lien free. By refinancing the payoff you are giving the dealer the money to pay off your outstanding loan.

The Calculations Should Look Like This:

Selling Price of the New Vehicle You are Purchasing

+ Sales Tax and Title Fees

Trade-in Allowance

+ Payoff

Rebates and/or Cash Down (if any)

________________________________

= Amount Due or Amount to be Financed

One Word of Caution However:

Make the car dealer put in writing that they are going to use the payoff amount to immediately pay off your car loan on your trade. This is very common, and most dealers take care of it right away.

However, I’ve seen cases where a dealer was having cash flow problems and they sat on the money and waited a month or more before they got around to paying off a loan. Until the loan is paid off you are responsible for making the payments on it. So be careful.

I hope this helps. It is very easy to get confused when there is a payoff involved. If you just take it a step at a time it is very easy to follow. By adding it to the new loan after the trade-in allowance has been subtracted you are in essence killing two birds with one stone:

you are paying off the outstanding loan

you are trading your car to the car dealer with a clear title so he can then resell the vehicle

The bottom line to remember is that the payoff owed is your loan and therefore it is your responsibility to pay in full.


5 Safety Features That Can Save You Money on Car Insurance #car #breakdown #cover


#insurance car
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5 Safety Features That Can Save You Money on Car Insurance

2 days ago

NerdWallet Providing clarity for all of life’s financial decisions.

By Barbara Marquand All sorts of high-tech safety equipment is available on today’s new cars, from systems that automatically apply the brakes if you’re in danger of crashing to rear-view cameras that let you see obstructions behind your car.

But in most cases, the really cool stuff is too new to score car insurance discounts. The safety features that usually qualify have been around for decades, such as anti-lock brakes.

NerdWallet looked at car-safety discounts available from the 10 largest insurance companies. Only Liberty Mutual says it offers discounts for newer innovations, including:

  • Adaptive cruise control. This monitors traffic conditions and adjusts speed by controlling the throttle and brakes to keep the car a safe distance from the vehicle in front of it.
  • Lane-departure warning systems. These use cameras to track the car’s position and alert the driver if the vehicle drifts out of the lane.
  • Collision-avoidance systems. These use sensors to recognize when a collision may happen, such as the vehicle skidding or approaching the car ahead too quickly. The systems may apply the brakes or take other actions to protect the driver and passengers.

[Buying a new car? Comparison shopping can save you hundreds of dollars. Find low rates with NerdWallet’s Car Insurance Comparison Tool .]

Most car insurance companies don’t offer discounts until safety technology has proven over many years to reduce insurance claims. Here are the safety features most likely to qualify you for a car insurance discount.

1. Anti-lock brakes Years ago drivers were instructed to “pump the brakes” if the vehicle was skidding, because a locked-up wheel is less effective at bringing the car under control than a wheel that is rotating slowly.

That advice went by the wayside with the development of anti-lock braking systems, which began appearing on high-end vehicles in the 1970s and was used on many models by the late 1980s, according to the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety. As of the 2012 model year, the federal government requires automakers to include anti-lock brakes as part of the standard equipment on all passenger vehicles.

Discounts for anti-lock brakes vary. Allstate offers a 10% discount, for instance, and 21st Century Insurance offers a 5% one.

Florida, New Jersey and New York require insurers to give a discount for anti-lock brakes.

2. Air bags Air bags cushion the blow for people during a crash. Frontal air bags have been required in all new passenger vehicles since the 1999 model year. Side air bags also are included as standard equipment on almost all cars to meet federal side-protection requirements, according to the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety. Some vehicles feature inflatable safety belts or rear-window curtain air bags to protect passengers in the back seat.

Car insurance discounts generally increase with the number of air bags. Geico, for instance, offers up to 25% off for driver-side air bags and up to 40% off for full front-seat air bags. The discount applies to medical payments or personal injury protection coverage.

Esurance offers a discount of 2% to 33% on medical payments coverage or personal injury protection, depending on the state and the number of safety features.

3. Daytime running lights Daytime running lights are headlights that come on automatically when the car starts. They help prevent daytime head-on and front-corner collisions. Automakers began offering daytime running lights in 1995, and now they’re a standard feature on many vehicles.

Some insurers offer a small discount. Geico says you can save 1%, for instance, on certain coverage.

4. Electronic stability control Electronic stability control systems help prevent vehicles from skidding out of control and rolling over when drivers have to steer hard or turn on slippery roads. The technology uses sensors and a computer to monitor how well the vehicle responds to steering and then automatically applies the brakes to keep the car under control.

The systems have been required on all cars, SUVs, pickups and minivans since the 2012 model year.

Insurers that offer a discount for electronic stability control typically apply it to collision coverage. Insurance claims payouts for collision coverage are about 15% lower for vehicles with electronic stability control versus those without it, according to an analysis by the Highway Loss Data Institute.

5. Automatic seat belts Motorized seat belts, which were often paired with manual lap belts, fastened automatically when the car was started or the door closed. Many automakers installed them to meet a federal requirement for vehicles to have automatic restraints, either motorized seat belts or air bags, from the 1990 model year onward. Air bags eventually replaced motorized seat belts, but many insurers still give the same discount for automatic seat belts as they give for air bags. Your car likely does not have automatic seat belts if it’s a 1998 model year or later.

The bottom line Discounts for safety features not only vary by insurance company, they also vary by state. An insurer may offer a discount in some states but not others, or the percentage may differ from state to state.

Ask your insurance representative about money-saving deals. But when shopping for insurance keep in mind that a company advertising large discounts may still not offer the lowest-cost coverage in the final tally. NerdWallet’s car insurance comparison tool can help you look for coverage to fit your needs and budget.

Image via iStock.


Associates vs Bachelors #bachelor, #salary, #this, #with, #between, #degree, #earn, #years, #that, #associates, #bachelors, #difference, #same, #attained, #education, #takes, #thanks, #clear, #four, #someone, #possible, #doesnt, #nursing, #told, #school, #fall, #about, #asked, #recently, #there, #starting, #skeptical, #little, #true, #seem


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Associates vs Bachelors

Hi hpatel84,
to Allnurses!

You will want to check into schools that have accelerated BSN programs and make sure you have the necessary pre-requisites (e.g. A P, microbiology, statistics, nutrition, etc.). Sociology is one of the pre-reqs, so you’ve got that covered!

Next, you should see what else the school requires in addition to pre-reqs and undergrad GPA. Some schools require the GRE or another standardized test. Some will require you to write an essay or submit letters of recommendation.

Let me know if you have any other questions! I am currently in an ABSN program.

Oh thank you so much for answering those questions! I have some other questions too! What are they looking for inparticular regarding schools in nursing and do you think it is a good idea to maybe try a Associates also just so I dont’ waste time. Have you heard of anything about how easy or hard it is to get into a Asociates-BSN program, i think its like an RN-BSN program or would that just be a waste of time?

You’re welcome, Hetal.

– Different programs look for different things. For example, one of the main criteria for an accelerated BSN program would be that you would have to have a bachelor’s degree in a non-nursing field. A 3.0 undergrad GPA is also usually the norm for these programs.

– I am not sure what the exact requirements are to get into an ADN program (associate’s in nursing). I hear these have waiting lists sometimes.

– Since you already have a bachelor’s degree, you would be an eligible applicant for an accelerated program. You could also go for your ADN (associate’s in nursing) and then do a bridge program (RN-to-BSN). You would definitely need your BSN if you want to become a CRNA.

Hi everyone!
I am a Georgia resident, currently working on a four year degree, but would like to switch to the field of nursing. I am planning on completing a CNA course this month, then do my LPN. The problem I am having is the prequisits. I have just two of them and would like to start the LPN course shortly after. Does anyone know of any accredited online courses that I can take to avoid these waiting list? I am engaged to be married soon and do not have a lot of time to wait around as I will have a family to support.
Thanks

Last edit by sudlow8 on May 28, ’08

You could also go for your ADN (associate’s in nursing) and then do a bridge program (RN-to-BSN). You would definitely need your BSN if you want to become a CRNA.

*** Not necessarily. A bachelors degree IS required for CRNA school but lots of schools accept degrees other than a BSN. You could go to CRNA school with an ADN and a bachelors in something else. My best friend just left for CRNA school. He has an ADN, a BS in biology and will graduate CRNA school with an MS in biology.
A BSN may be a better bet though.


Women in Community Colleges: Access to Success: AAUW #community #colleges #that #offer #bachelor #degrees


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Empowering Women Since 1881

Women in Community Colleges: Access to Success

More women than ever before — upwards of 4 million — are relying on community colleges for higher education and workforce preparation. Women at community colleges represent all ages, races, and ethnicities; include more than a million mothers; and have a range of goals. The main goal for many women is to gain job skills to be more competitive in the workforce. Mothers are motivated to pursue their education so they can better support their children and families. And for women who want a bachelor’s degree, community colleges provide an affordable path to achieving that goal.

Unfortunately, many women drop out before they can earn a certificate or degree or transfer to a four-year school. This report recommends policies and practices to help more women succeed in community colleges. Specifically, the report calls for increasing the availability of on-campus child care to help parents stay in school and outlines how community colleges can increase women’s participation and success in nontraditional and high-demand science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM ) fields.

With increased attention and outreach to women students, the nation’s community colleges can build on their legacy of providing educational opportunity to all. While this report may be of particular concern to women at community colleges, improving outcomes for women will benefit everyone.

Engage with the Research

This report was made possible thanks to generous contributions from AAUW members and donors to the Eleanor Roosevelt Fund and the Mooneen Lecce Giving Circle.

Here are some of the report’s findings:

  • Forty percent of undergraduates attend community colleges, and the majority of those who do are women.

  • Students choose community colleges for their affordability, proximity to students’ homes and work, and range of program offerings and degree options.
  • Within six years of enrolling in community college, almost half of students have not completed a degree, received a certificate, or transferred. In other words, they drop out.
  • Student parents who drop out of community college usually cite caregiving responsibilities and financial difficulties as their main reasons for leaving.
  • In 2010, about 49 percent of community colleges provided on-campus child care, compared to 57 percent of four-year public schools and just 9 percent of four-year private schools.
  • Community colleges offer certificates and associate degrees so students can prepare for STEM jobs that may not require a bachelor’s degree, but women are still underrepresented in STEM fields at community colleges.
  • Women are more likely than men to attend community college on the way to earning a bachelor’s degree in a STEM field .

Here are changes that can help support women at community colleges:

For federal data collectors

The main federal data system for higher education (the Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System, or IPEDS) does not adequately report outcomes for community college students. If we expect community colleges to do more in the next decades, we need to have access to better information — we must address the limitations of our current data collection and reporting systems.

For educators and administrators

Educators and advisers at community colleges should be aware of gender stereotypes and how they can negatively influence a student’s experience. As a key point of contact for students, academic advisers can play a proactive role by promoting nontraditional careers like STEM to women students.

For Congress

Congress should increase funding for the Campus Child Care Means Parents in School (CCAMPIS) program, which is the main federal source for on-campus child care funding.

For everyone

Community college administrators, local support groups, and Congress can all take steps to increase the availability of child care to meet the needs and demands of the growing population of student parents who attend community colleges.

Related

Child Care on Campus:
A Must for Mothers in College

More than 4 million women attend two-year public institutions or community colleges, and more than 1 million of them are mothers.

While working full time, I made the decision to attend community college.

While the report offers data at the national level on community colleges, the numbers at the state level tell their own stories.


Colleges that Offer Nursing Programs in the U #colleges #with # #year #nursing #programs, #colleges #that #offer #nursing


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Colleges that Offer Nursing Programs in the U.S.

Find schools that offer these popular programs

  • Clinical Nursing
  • Critical Care Nursing
  • Direct-Entry Midwifery – LM, CPM
  • Licensed Vocational Nurse Training
  • Mental Health Nursing
  • Neonatal Nursing
  • Nurse Anesthetist
  • Nurse Assistant or Patient Care Assistant
  • Nurse Midwife
  • Nurse Practitioner or Family Nurse Practitioner
  • Nursing Administration
  • Nursing for Adults and Seniors
  • Nursing Science
  • Occupational Health Nursing
  • Operating Room and Surgical Nursing
  • Pediatric Nursing
  • Public Health Nurse or Community Nurse
  • Registered Nurse

College Selection Criteria

Keep these important considerations in mind when selecting a nursing program:

  • Some schools offer submatriculation programs that enable students to work towards a master’s and bachelor’s degree at the same time, dual major programs that can allow students to expand their career options and accelerated or part-time programs.
  • There are a plethora of nursing disciplines from which a student can choose, such as pediatrics, oncology, palliative care, occupational therapy, psychiatry, and geriatrics.
  • Students should look for accreditation when choosing a nursing program. Nursing programs are generally accredited by at least one of two accreditation boards: the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) and the National League for Nursing Accreditation Commission (NLNAC).
  • It’s important to consider long-term career goals to ensure that the program selected offers the right specialization training, or an opportunity for advancement to administration or to work as a nurse practitioner if desired.

Associate of Applied Science in Nursing

The coursework combines classroom instruction with clinical studies in a variety of medical settings, from hospitals to doctor’s offices. Upon completion of the program, students are eligible to take the NCLEX-RN exam. Students study topics such as:

Bachelor of Science in Nursing

Earning a bachelor’s degree in nursing can help a student stand out with potential employers, or help a practicing nurse become eligible for supervisory positions such as head or charge nurse.

Master of Science in Nursing

A master’s degree in nursing allows students to focus on a specific area of nursing and further their knowledge and authority in the chosen area.

DNP in Nursing

This program is designed for nurses who want to enter the academic and research areas. Students choose a specialization in which they do the bulk of their research with the assistance of instructors and a mentor. Some programs require applicants to hold an MSN.

Nursing students may wish to specialize in a specific field of medicine, take a dual major, or begin studies towards their master’s degree while completing an undergraduate degree. The student’s long-term career goals and academic interests, as well as the costs of public versus private schools, should be considered when choosing a nursing program.

Next: View Schools

Colleges that offer nursing majors prepare students for licensure exams through classroom instruction and clinical training.

California recently awarded $2.7 million in grants to 19 postsecondary nursing programs through the Office of Statewide Health.

As many career-seekers know, healthcare is one of the most rapidly expanding fields, and a projected nurse shortage is making.

Individuals who are looking for a part-time nursing program, either because they want to maintain a full-time job while getting.

  • Doctorate
      • Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP)
      • Doctor of Nursing Practice with an Emphasis in Educational Leadership
      • EdD in Organizational Leadership – Health Care Administration
  • Master
      • MBA and MS in Nursing: Nursing Leadership in Health Care Systems (dual degree)
      • MS in Nursing: Nursing Leadership in Health Care Systems
      • M.S. in Nursing: Nursing Education
      • MS in Nursing: Nursing Education
      • MBA: Health Systems Management
      • MS in Health Care Administration
  • Bachelor
      • BS in Nursing (Registered Nurse – R.N. to BSN)
      • BS in Health Care Administration
      • BS in Health Sciences: Professional Development & Advanced Patient Care
      • Bachelor of Science in Behavioral Health Science

Get Started with Grand Canyon University

5 Ashford University

Minimum eligibility requirements:
  • Must be 22 years of age or older
  • Programs offered by Ashford and listed below may not be related to the topic covered by the above article.
School locations:

Cars That Depreciate In Value The Most #used #suvs #for #sale


#value of used car
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Cars That Depreciate In Value The Most

Depreciation is that moment when you drive a new car off the lot and the car instantly loses 20% of its value. Some cars hold their value better than others. The cars that depreciate the most on automotive lists tend to be high-end luxury cars or very cheap sub-compact cars. However, there are many models at both of these levels that hold their value and are consistently regarded as reliable and safe.

Many things factor into the true cost of owning a car. Depreciation is a major factor. Automotive sources use a basic formula that spans an average five-year ownership of a vehicle to determine its depreciation value. According to a recent survey by CarMax, high mileage on a car was the number one factor in its depreciation. Other sources, such as Popular Mechanics. cite poor quality, bad design, the expense of repairs and sometimes just that the general public doesn’t like the car. Do you remember the Edsel? Born from a marketing blitz, the Ford Motor Company created an entire division around the car. It seemed destined for success, but it bombed. Nothing was really wrong with the car. In fact, it had state-of-the-art technology for the era, but consumers hated it.

Ford isn’t the only carmaker that saw the value of one of its models sink like an anchor when it hit the lot. The Mazda RX didn’t live up to its hype, and sales of the car dropped. The highly-touted Nissan Leaf, one of the first all-electric cars, left many drivers stranded because its power gauges were incorrect. Depreciation is also a result of the substantial competition in the auto industry today.

“The automotive industry is so competitive these days that you’re seeing vehicles being redesigned every four or five years,” said Eric Ibara of Kelley Blue Book. “If you see a vehicle that is in its fourth or fifth year and not doing well selling [new] retail, it would tend not to hold its value as well as its competitors.”

Plus, those incentives to buy that car dealers love to lure us with will depreciate a vehicle very quickly, too.

Here are few models that depreciate the most.

Luxury Models

Range Rover

This is a staid, timeless SUV that unfortunately used some very subpar electronics in a few model years. Word spread quickly and that new Range Rover that was purchased for $60,000 can be now had for $5,500.

Cadillac Escalade

As the luxury carmaker tried in earnest to create a luxury SUV, gas prices soared and interest in this gas guzzler died. Carrying a sticker price of over $80,000 new, you can pick up a low-mileage Escalade for less than $30,000 today.

Jaguar S-Type

Although there is nothing inherently wrong with the Jag S, its design looks dated. Originally selling for $60,000, models can be found for around $10,000.

Mercedes-Benz S-Class

Oddly, this model has taken one of the worst beatings in the depreciation department, with the ability to lose more than 80% of its value in five years. Again, it is an old, respected brand and even the experts can’t figure out why the value has dropped so significantly.

Mid-Size and Compact Cars

Experts warn you away from any carmaker that has financial issues, such as Chrysler and Saab. Values of models from both these manufacturers have plummeted, particularly the Chrysler Sebring and the Saab 9-3.

The values of the Chevrolet Cobalt and Mercury Grand Marquis drop a staggering 80% after purchase. One of the reasons is that the design of these models hasn’t been updated in four years.


5 Uncommon Home Insurance Claims – Insurance policy – Homeowner #homeowners #insurance #policy, #uncommon #insurance #claims, #home #insurance #claims, #does #my #insurance #cover #that, #what #does #home #insurance #cover, #protecting #my #home, #insurance #claims, #repairing #my #home


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What Does My Home Insurance Cover?

En español | If your house is damaged by fire, it’s a pretty sure bet that your homeowners insurance policy will cover the cost to repair it. But what if the damage results from something less common, such as mold or a meteor falling from the sky? Chances are you’re also covered. Homeowners insurance policies vary, as do state laws, but typical policies cover many atypical claims. Here’s a look at five of the more unusual things for which your homeowners insurance should foot the bill.

Insuring your home

  • How to conduct a home inventory. Read
  • Insuring your collectibles. Read
  • How to develop a plan for your home, neighborhood and community. Do
  • Older disaster victims fail to seek aid. Read

Join AARP Today — Receive access to exclusive information, benefits and discounts.

Dog bites

More than 4.7 million people are bitten by dogs each year, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, resulting in around 800,000 injuries that require medical attention. More than 50 percent of the bites occur on a dog owner’s property.

Dog bites are probably the single most common cause of liability claims on a homeowner’s policy, says Bill Wilson of the Independent Insurance Agents Brokers of America. The Insurance Information Institute (III) estimates that dog bites account for one-third of all liability claims.

According to Wilson, most homeowners insurance policies will cover the medical bills for someone bit by a dog — or a cat or snake or other domestic animal, for that matter — and even pay lost wages if the person can’t work. On a typical homeowner’s policy, liability coverage maxes out between $100,000 and $300,000. If you get sued and a judgment exceeds that amount, you’re on the hook for the difference. The III says the average dog bite claim totals about $25,000.

Photo by St. Petersburg Times/ZUMA Press

Annie Gamble was watching TV in her bedroom in St. Petersburg, Fla. when a tree crashed through her roof.

Mold

For many homeowners, mold is a four-letter word that conjures up fears of illness and expensive cleanup. Indeed, the cost of mold remediation can run into the thousands of dollars. Whether your homeowners insurance policy will cover mold damage largely depends on the underlying cause of the mold.

In general, homeowners insurance will pay out for mold damage that’s a direct result of a peril that’s covered by your policy. Let’s say mold, which needs moisture to thrive, is caused by water from a burst pipe, a covered peril. In that case, any resulting mold damage should be covered because the source of the water is covered by your policy.

But if mold is due to long-term neglect or overdue maintenance, rather than a sudden and unexpected covered peril, then homeowners insurance is unlikely to cover the damage. Possible scenarios include excessive humidity in an attic, seepage into a basement or leaky pipes and appliances. You usually need separate flood insurance to cover damage from flooding.

Even if mold is covered, check to see if your policy caps damage at a certain amount. If so, it’s possible to buy additional coverage. Wilson says an extra $50,000 in mold coverage costs about $47 a year. The average annual premium for a homeowners insurance policy is $791, according to the III.

Terrorism

Homeowners insurance typically excludes acts of war. The same blanket exclusion doesn’t hold true for acts of terrorism, which are more akin to a criminal act than an armed conflict. Wilson says insurers should cover damage due to explosion, fire and smoke resulting from a terrorist attack, even if terrorism isn’t specifically referenced in your homeowners policy.

For example, take the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. Residences near New York’s World Trade Center suffered blown windows and smoke damage. In that instance, those repairs were covered. Insured property losses from the 9/11 attacks totaled nearly $23 billion in 2009 dollars, estimates the III.

But coverage of a terrorist attack isn’t guaranteed since there’s little precedent in the United States save for 9/11. In the unlikely event that you ever need to file a terrorism-related claim, figure your home insurer will treat it on a case-by-case basis. Besides acts of war, typical homeowners policies don’t consider nuclear accidents a covered peril.

Falling objects

A limb breaking off a tree during a storm. Debris dropping from an airplane passing high overhead. Even a meteor falling from the sky. If any of those objects damage your home, rest assured your homeowners insurance should cover the repairs up to your policy limits.

Keep in mind that while the hole in your roof is covered, any ensuing damage might not be unless you make reasonable efforts to prevent further damage. If it’s raining, for example, you should cover the hole with a tarp as soon as it’s safe to do so to prevent more water infiltration. Wilson suggests holding off on making permanent repairs until your insurance adjuster can assess the extent of the damage.

Accidents outside the home

If someone gets hurt on your property, perhaps slipping on an icy stairwell, your homeowners policy should cover the medical bills. What you might not know is that your homeowners coverage can extend to injuries beyond the home, too.

Let’s say you’re at the grocery store, and you crash your shopping cart into another patron. Your homeowners insurance would cover the other person’s medical expenses. Same goes for the golf course and if you hit someone with a stray drive. As a bonus, coverage provided by a standard policy extends to anywhere in the world, not just to the United States.

Homeowners insurance excludes these types of claims related to use of a car, Wilson says. You need to rely on your auto insurance then. If you have a lot of assets to protect and you’re worried about getting sued, look into umbrella insurance. An umbrella policy kicks in when you exceed the liability limits of your home and auto policies.

10 Most Expensive States
for Homeowners Insurance

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That Time Mazda Paid A Handsome French Doctor To Feel My Balls #sell #a #car


#my cars value
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That Time Mazda Paid A Handsome French Doctor To Feel My Balls

Anyone who’s fortunate enough to stumble into the world of car writing quickly discovers that it’s the greatest grift in human history, a virtually non-stop travel orgy of luxury hotels, business-class airline travel, open bars with premium Scotch, foie gras, steaks, little toasts with cr me fraiche and salmon, champagne pours, free leather driving shoes and race-team jackets, unlimited access to the most glamorous and powerful cars in the world, and once, in my case, a testicular exam in Paris.

All the industry asks for in return is our integrity. Most of the people who practice automotive journalism, the world’s oldest profession, are readily willing to give up their professional honor because they make about as much money every year as the average Dunkin’ Donuts shift manager.

Still, for some, mere Platinum status on Delta isn’t enough. A while ago, a thread on the Facebook page of Dan Neil, the Pulitzer-Prize-winning car writer, told of the European car hack who walked out of his luxury hotel, which he didn’t pay for, carrying a flat-screen TV; of the archetypal guy who emptied his mini-bar three nights running; of the dude who stuffed fireplace-stoking equipment into his golf bag and said “charge it to my tab;” of hundreds of dollars worth of unauthorized luxury spa treatments; or, best of all, of the Scottish journalist who produced a 17-page printout of all the porn he’d watched in a Korean hotel room over the course of three days, causing him to be nicknamed “Mince,” because that’s what happens when you wear the skin off a sausage.

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Sports Management Courses #colleges #that #offer #sports #management


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How To Trade In a Car That You Still Owe Money On – or That Has a Payoff! #cheapest #car #insurance #for #young #drivers


#trade in your car
#

How To Trade In a Car That You Still Owe Money On,

or That Has a Payoff!

Many people get thrown for a loop when it comes time to trade in a vehicle with an outstanding loan payoff on it. Car dealers are very familiar with how to take trades with money owed on them, but often, when they try to explain the process the customer gets more confused then when they started!

Here’s How It Works:

You take the selling price of the vehicle you’re buying, add tax and title fees, subtract your trade-in allowance, then add your payoff to the total. This gives you your total amount due. Subtract from that any cash down and/or rebates and you have the amount to be financed on the new loan.

The payoff has to be paid off in order for the dealer to get a clear title to your trade. In essence, when you trade a car to a dealer you are really selling it to them. You can’t sell a car without providing a clear title. By a clear title I mean a title that is lien free. By refinancing the payoff you are giving the dealer the money to pay off your outstanding loan.

The Calculations Should Look Like This:

Selling Price of the New Vehicle You are Purchasing

+ Sales Tax and Title Fees

Trade-in Allowance

+ Payoff

Rebates and/or Cash Down (if any)

________________________________

= Amount Due or Amount to be Financed

One Word of Caution However:

Make the car dealer put in writing that they are going to use the payoff amount to immediately pay off your car loan on your trade. This is very common, and most dealers take care of it right away.

However, I’ve seen cases where a dealer was having cash flow problems and they sat on the money and waited a month or more before they got around to paying off a loan. Until the loan is paid off you are responsible for making the payments on it. So be careful.

I hope this helps. It is very easy to get confused when there is a payoff involved. If you just take it a step at a time it is very easy to follow. By adding it to the new loan after the trade-in allowance has been subtracted you are in essence killing two birds with one stone:

you are paying off the outstanding loan

you are trading your car to the car dealer with a clear title so he can then resell the vehicle

The bottom line to remember is that the payoff owed is your loan and therefore it is your responsibility to pay in full.