Car Insurance Rates Mobile Form, what car should i buy.#What #car #should #i #buy


Car Insurance On-The-Go

Comparing car insurance rates online is easier than ever with our handy new mobile app. You can still get the same benefit you get from the normal version of our site by entering your ZIP code above, which will allow you to compare specialized offers from major national insurance providers and local agents in your area. Gone are the days when you had to call one carrier after another – CarInsuranceRates.com has done all the heavy lifting for you! Just enter your ZIP code in the box above to see what our participating providers have in store for you.

Expert Insurance Guides

Need help picking the right options? Not sure what the various industry terms mean? We’ve got your back! CarInsuranceRates.com is chalk-full of helpful guides, useful tips, and article after article of informative information, complete with charts, checklists, and case study to help you make the best decision when selecting your policy type or end-provider.

State-by-State Requirements

Locality is one of the top factors that will influence what you can or can’t do with your car insurance policy. Laws, rules, and regulations changes all the time, and it’s our mission to try and keep you as up-to-date with pertinent information so you can make the right choice when selecting you coverage levels or provider.

Ask a Question, Get an Answer

Still need help getting to the bottom of your insurance situation? We have an easy-to-use library of questions-and-answers from current clients, with a wide range of solutions that even shocks us on occasion. No matter how obscure your query seems to be, don’t fret – we can help point you in the right direction of the information you need.

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Car Insurance Rates Mobile Form, what car should i buy.#What #car #should #i #buy


Car Insurance On-The-Go

Comparing car insurance rates online is easier than ever with our handy new mobile app. You can still get the same benefit you get from the normal version of our site by entering your ZIP code above, which will allow you to compare specialized offers from major national insurance providers and local agents in your area. Gone are the days when you had to call one carrier after another – CarInsuranceRates.com has done all the heavy lifting for you! Just enter your ZIP code in the box above to see what our participating providers have in store for you.

Expert Insurance Guides

Need help picking the right options? Not sure what the various industry terms mean? We’ve got your back! CarInsuranceRates.com is chalk-full of helpful guides, useful tips, and article after article of informative information, complete with charts, checklists, and case study to help you make the best decision when selecting your policy type or end-provider.

State-by-State Requirements

Locality is one of the top factors that will influence what you can or can’t do with your car insurance policy. Laws, rules, and regulations changes all the time, and it’s our mission to try and keep you as up-to-date with pertinent information so you can make the right choice when selecting you coverage levels or provider.

Ask a Question, Get an Answer

Still need help getting to the bottom of your insurance situation? We have an easy-to-use library of questions-and-answers from current clients, with a wide range of solutions that even shocks us on occasion. No matter how obscure your query seems to be, don’t fret – we can help point you in the right direction of the information you need.

Visit the Full Site

Is our mobile display just not doing it for you? We have the fully-loaded, live version of our site standing by. Just click the link below to view the site as though you were on a desktop machine.

800 Fifth Avenue, Suite 4100, Seattle, WA 98104


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What car should i buy


Why You Should NOT Buy a New Car – ReadyForZero Blog #rc #car


#what car should i buy
#

Why You Should NOT Buy a New Car

17 Oct 2012 by Ben

Welcome to the 5th  Smart Money Debate at ReadyForZero . To see the other side  of this debate, read Miranda s post: Why You Should Buy a New Car (Not Used). And then let us know which argument was more convincing!

Buying new things is fun. I love unwrapping the shiny packaging, opening up the box, and smelling the factory made scent of something brand new. There is nothing quite like holding something in your hands that nobody else has ever used. It makes you feel well special.

You know what makes me feel even more special than buying something brand new? Saving money. That is why almost everything I purchase is used. Don t get me wrong I m not one to purchase a used pair of Hanes. However, with most items, you can find great deals if you are willing to buy used. This is especially true when it comes to major purchases like cars.

While I wouldn t recommend buying any old lemon, buying used cars is the only thing that makes sense financially. Our family has purchased new before, and we consider it to be one of the biggest financial mistakes we have ever made. Here is why we will never buy a new car again and neither should you!

Reason #1: New Cars Don t Hold Their Value

We ve all heard this before, but it bears repeating: a new car begins losing value the minute that you drive it off the lot. How much value you ask? According to Edmunds.com, a new car loses approximately 10% of its value as soon as you drive away. 10%. Furthermore, it loses about 20% of its value after the first year, and 10% off the original purchase price per year after that. Depending on the make and model of your new car, you may have lost up to 80% of the value from the purchase price within 5 years!

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Would you invest $25,000 in the stock market if you knew that you were going to lose $2,500 the moment you completed the transaction? Would you buy a house for $200,000 if you knew for a fact that it would only be worth $180,000 the minute you were handed the key and $160,000 a year later. Of course you wouldn t! No sane person would. Why would you do the same thing with a car? Let somebody take that huge financial hit by buying the new car. Then, you can take advantage of their silliness and buy the car used after they trade it in a few years later.

Reason #2: Used Cars are Cheaper

Since new cars are clearly a poor investment, it makes sense that the sticker price for used cars is far less expensive than the newer models. For instance, a brand new 2012 Toyota Prius is currently selling for around $28,500. Earlier this year, we were able to purchase a used 2009 Prius with under 25,000 miles for only $17,500. While red isn t exactly my favorite color, I was happy to suffer through it in order to save $11,000.

Reason #3: Less Worry

You know the nervous feeling that you get when you buy something new? You become very protective of it. You don t want anything to spill or scratch it. You re so proud of it that you want it to stay looking all brand new and shiny for forever. That is why you bought the product new in the first place. Afterall, what good is a new car if it doesn t actually look new.

I hate to tell you this, but eventually everything that is new is going to become blemished. When it does, you may be devastated especially if you spent as much money on it as you would a car. Why not save yourself all of that worry, headache, and stress? Just buy your cars used. A nick, dent, or scratch doesn t seem like such a big deal then.

Reason #4: Warranties are Available

People who tell you to buy a new car will tout the great warranties with which new cars come. Guess what. Most used cars will come with a warranty as well. In fact, the most important warranty the manufacturer s powertrain warranty should still be in effect as long as the car has not exceeded its age or mileage limits. This warranty covers all of the big stuff that might break like your engine or transmission. So, the warranty argument doesn t really hold water. If the warranty is in effect, the argument that you are going to have to pay for more repairs to a used car than you would for a new car doesn t really work either.

Reason #5: A New Car is a Bad Investment

Have I mentioned that a new car loses 10% of its value the moment you drive it off the lot and 20% of its value over the first year alone. Oh, I did? Good. Well, this is so important that I m mentioning it again. If that new car smell is still tempting you, go back and read Reason #1 to help snap you back into reality. Then, go out and buy a New Car Smell air freshener to put in your used car, and save yourself thousands of dollars.

As you can see, buying a new car is not the best decision for your finances. While that new car smell may make you feel like you are loaded, buying a new car is just another way of trying to look wealthy. It is a status symbol that savvy spenders can do without. If you re in the market for a new car, do yourself a favor and buy a used one instead.

No matter what you decide, use ReadyForZero to track your debt payoff it s a free online tool that helps you stay motivated and pay off your debt in the fastest time frame possible.

To see the other side  of this debate, read Miranda s post: Why You Should Buy a New Car (Not Used). And then let us know which argument was more convincing!

This post was published by Ben, Content Manager and Writer for » ReadyForZero. ReadyForZero is a company that helps people get out of debt on their own with a simple and free online tool that can automate and track your debt paydown.


Should I Sell My Car? #nissan #car


#sell my car
#

Ask the Readers: Should I Sell My Car?

Published on February 11th, 2011

The Friday Ask the Readers column generally follows a set format: I introduce the topic, share a reader e-mail, give my best advice, and then ask for your feedback. Today s column is a little different. Sarah sent me a 1000-word question, and rather than write any sort of response, I m just going to let her have the entire space. Everything that follows is from Sarah.

I have a question for other GRS readers. It’s a simple question: Should I sell my car? It actually seems to have a very simple answer: Yes.

I keep writing lists and outlining the reasons why I should sell my car (and why I shouldn’t), and the balance lies very clearly in favor of selling my car. And yet I’m having the hardest time selling my car.

Why? I’m a practical, logical, pragmatic person. Why is this so hard to do? Why is selling my car so difficult? Even with the facts laid out, staring me in the face, I’m having the hardest time selling my car.

Why I Bought a Car in the First Place

I used to live completely car-free. I lived in different cities and only walked, bused, or biked to get around occasionally living the high life and taking a taxi when I felt like being luxurious. And then I moved to California.

I bought a car last year. I purchased a 2010 Toyota Matrix from a dealer, priced at $17,490, with a $1000 rebate for being a recent college grad. The Kelly Blue Book value of the car, at new, was $20,049. My purchase price was $16,490. With taxes, registration, and fees, I forked over $19,009. As a somewhat-savvy consumer, I secured a three-year financing plan with 0% interest.

I bought the car because I lived 40 miles from my job, commuting an hour each way (through San Francisco, across the Golden Gate Bridge), and there wasn’t sufficient public transportation to get me to and from my job.

I ve now owned (and paid for) the car for 12 months, spending $6800 on car payments. I have $12,200 left to pay on the car over a two-year period.

The cost of the car has been unbelievable. In one year, these are the costs:

  • Car payments $529 per month
  • 20,000 miles total
    • 25 mpg average
    • gas price is $3.15 in California
    • $2520 for gas, or
    • $210 per month in gasoline
  • Maintenance for one year (four tune-ups at $109 each) $436 ($36 per month for maintenance)
  • Insurance $109 per month for insurance (AAA)
  • Bridge Tolls (crossing the Golden Gate Bridge every day costs $5) $80 per month
  • Parking. I’m lucky to have free parking, mostly, unless I drive downtown $50 per month is my average for parking

Every month, I spend about $1014 on driving and owning the car. $1014! This is roughly one third of my take-home income. What would I do with $1014 per month.

In addition, I have a substantial amount of debt from undergraduate and graduate student loans (in the realm of $80,000) that I’m currently working hard to pay off. The student loan payments are $679 per month. I struggle to make the car payment and the student loan payment each month.

Today: The Current Situation

In November, I moved back to San Francisco, because I couldn’t stand the long commute. Commuting through city traffic is tiring and psychologically draining; I quickly remembered why I dislike driving so much. In contrast, San Francisco is a hub of public transportation options sometimes better or worse, depending on the neighborhood that you live in.

I now live eight miles from my job in Sausalito. The drive takes about 15-20 minutes, depending on traffic. Parking at my job is easy, but parking in San Francisco is a nightmare it can take up to 40 minutes to find a parking spot. I have the option of purchasing a parking spot, but those cost upwards of $300 in a city like San Francisco, and I can’t stomach how much I’m already spending on the car alone.

I now have alterative means for getting to work. For example, I can bike to work a few days per week, depending on the day and the weather. There s also a bus line that goes to and from my work on the hour, and takes about 30-40 minutes to get to work (it doubles my commute time, but I don’t have to worry about parking, driving, or concentrating on the road).

The (Easy) Conclusions

I worry that it’s a mistake to sell my car after owning it for one year. My parents tell me that I should wait it out for the next two years, buckle down, and just finish making the payments because I need a car and can’t possibly live without one. People suggest that it’s foolish to buy a brand new car and sell a car within the first year of ownership.

However, I also think that sunk costs are sunk costs. What I’ve already spent on the car is gone; it s what I spend in the future that s still up for determination. I think it makes sense for me to sell my car.

Here are some reasons I think I should sell my car:

  • Living in a city with ample public transportation, alternative car-sharing options, bicycle riding, and walking makes having a car a luxury, not a necessity.
  • Getting rid of $12,200 of unpaid debt is a good thing.
  • There are additional costs to car ownership insurance, gas, parking, maintenance that will continue to add up over time. (To the tune of about $450 per month.)
  • The current value of my car ($14,000) is more than I owe on my payments ($12,200)
  • But wait! There s more!

    • A car is a depreciating asset, and will not add any value over time. Struggling to make these payments does not help me reduce or eliminate debt in other areas of my life.
  • Public transportation to work costs $4 each way, or approximately $160 per month.
  • If I also choose to use a car-sharing program on the weekends, I would spend between $50 and $75 for a weekend use but the cost would be elective, and not fixed.
  • If I don’t spend the money on the car, I can spend the money on other things that are more important.
  • It seems painfully clear, on paper, that I should sell my car. And yet I get in and drive it every single day to teach swim lesson after work, to dinner parties, to events, on trips to Tahoe, on excursions. I am afraid of selling my car. Psychologically and emotionally, I’m attached to it. I also stubbornly don’t want to admit I made a mistake in buying the car in the first place.

    So tell me, fellow GRS readers, what should I do? Can I afford to sell my car? Can I afford not to?

    J.D. s note: Though I don t have room for my traditional long reply, I ll just chime in to say I m glad that Sarah mentioned sunk costs. That s a very important thing to remember in making these sorts of decisions. (What you ve spent already is irrelevant; it s what you spend going forward that matters.) And I think her situation highlights why it s often best to buy a cheap used car than a brand-new one. I think a $2,000 beater would be perfect for her.

    GRS is committed to helping our readers save and achieve their financial goals. Savings interest rates may be low, but that is all the more reason to shop for the best rate. Find the highest savings interest rates and CD rates from Synchrony Bank. Ally Bank. GE Capital Bank. and more.


    Should You Purchase Rental Car insurance? US News #we #buy #any #car


    #car rental insurance
    #

    Should You Purchase Rental Car insurance?

    You might already be covered for your summer road trip.

    The warm summer weather might have you itching for a road trip. But before you hit the road, you may need to spring for a rental car. And before you do that, you’ll need to decide whether to purchase rental car insurance.

    It’s a tricky decision, given the fact that you may already be covered through your existing car insurance or your credit card. Your personal auto car coverage usually does cover rental car coverage, says Merle Scheiber of the National Association of Insurance Commissioners.

    Through your personal auto car coverage, you’ll want to make sure you have collision coverage, which pays for damages to your vehicle from accidents involving other cars or objects. For people who already have collision coverage on the rental car, getting the rental car insurance policy is a waste of money, says Neil Abrams, an auto rental consultant of Abrams Consulting Group based in Purchase, N.Y. If you don’t have collision coverage, you’ll either have to pay for the rental car insurance or use a credit card to pay for the rental car—one that has rental car insurance built in.

    A number of major credit card providers offer rental auto insurance to cardholders, such as Visa, but certain cards only offer it to elite members, so check with your credit card company first. For example, Visa’s auto rental collision-damage waiver (given to Visa credit card holders) provides reimbursement for damage due to collision or theft up to the actual cash value of most rental vehicles. However, Visa’s coverage kicks in only on theft or damage expenses that are not covered by other insurance or reimbursement. In essence, the credit card acts as a secondary insurer, and it would still be wise to have your own personal auto insurance.

    The benefits of buying insurance from the rental company? It protects you from significant out-of-pocket expenses associated with loss or damage to the vehicle, including theft, says Abrams. Rental car insurance can cost roughly $20 to $40, depending on what plan you select. The collision damage waiver, also known as optional vehicle protection or loss damage waiver, can cost as much as $19 per day and shifts liability for collision damage from the person renting the car to the car rental company. Liability insurance, which provides protection for up to $1 million, costs between $7 and $14 a day. However, your personal auto insurance should already include liability insurance. For an additional $1 to $5 a day, personal accident insurance covers medical and ambulance bills for the driver and passengers in the event of an accident.

    The rental companies are required to provide statutory minimum liability coverage, Abrams says. But in a significant event, that’s not going to do much for you. Statutory minimum liability coverage provides some protection to individuals involved in an accident while driving a rental vehicle—the same minimum coverage that would apply to personal coverage.

    It’s not insurance, in the technical sense, that rental companies offer, Abrams says. Rental companies are not licensed insurance agents in every state. Instead, they offer a protection package. It doesn’t help where clear negligence is involved, Abrams warns. If you leave your car with the engine running and the key in the ignition, and the car disappears, the rental company may have a problem with that.

    Abrams adds that some people are protected through their homeowner’s policy. Home owners can extend the liability when the policyholder is not in their home, i.e. while renting a car. However, the provisions vary from one policy to another, so be sure to check ahead of time.

    Jan Zobel, a tax preparer in Oakland, Calif. rents a car when she travels to Hawaii several times a year. Zobel receives coverage using her American Express card, which charges her $17.95 per rental. I’m not a big AmEx card user, but you can bet that I pay for every rental now with that card, she says.


    When Should You Trade In Your Car? Don – t Listen To What Others Say – Run The Numbers Yourself – The Simple Dollar #car #trawler


    #trade in your car
    #

    When Should You Trade In Your Car? Don t Listen To What Others Say Run The Numbers Yourself

    The week’s most interesting and impactful posts about financial lifestyle.

    A reader writes in describing a debate she s having with her husband:

    I m not sure but someplace on your site I think I saw something about how often to trade in your old car. Our SUV is a 2005 with 55,000 miles on it. My husband says its time to trade it in. He says the longer we drive it the worse off we will be. I m not so sure. We will pay cash for the difference if we trade. Can you give us any pointers?

    The husband s philosophy, if I understand it correctly, is that the older a car is, the less trade-in value it will have and that s absolutely correct. An older vehicle will have less trade-in value.

    But let s look at some real numbers. Let s look at the trade value of Dodge Durangos (they have a SUV, after all) from 1998 to 2006 and assume the median of the range given.

    A new midrange 2008 Dodge Durango, according to AOL Autos, costs $31,835. Let s just assume this is the price one would have paid in earlier years for a Durango. It may have been less, but probably not significantly so.

    A 2006 Dodge Durango would have been owned for 24 months and would have a cash value of $18,225. This is a total depreciation of $13,610, or $567 a month for the entire time of ownership.

    A 2005 Dodge Durango would have been owned for 36 months and would have a cash value of $14,062.50. This is a total depreciation of $17,772.50, or $493 a month for the entire time of ownership. Over that last twelve month period, the vehicle only depreciated $4,162.50 or $347 a month.

    Let s keep going for two more years so the picture becomes clearer. A 2004 Dodge Durango would have been owned for 48 months and would have a cash value of $12,500. This is a total depreciation of $19,335, or $402 a month. Even more impressive, over that last twelve month period, the vehicle only depreciated $1,562.50 or $130 a month.

    A 2003 Dodge Durango would have been owned for 60 months and would have a cash value of $10,512.50. This is a total depreciation of $21,322.50, or $355 a month. Again, over that last twelve month period, the vehicle only depreciated $1,987.50 or $166 a month.

    What s the meaning of this data? The longer you hold onto a car, the less it depreciates each year, and thus the more cost-effective it becomes. A 2003 Durango has a trade value much less than a 2006 Durango, but if you break it down into the depreciation per month, the person owning the 2003 Durango lost much less money per month than the owner of the 2006 Durango.

    Another thing to notice is that car depreciation is at its worst during the first few years of owning a car. Thus, to maximize the bang for your buck, your best bet is to buy a model three or four years old. That way, it doesn t depreciate thousands of dollars each year you own it.

    What s the conclusion? The best value in cars is buying a late model used and driving it until the repair bills start seriously racking up. This plan minimizes the per-year cost of your car and gives you the most years of cost-effective reliability. If you insist on buying new (not the best move), the more years you drive your older car, the more cost-effective your purchase becomes.

    Upgrading a three year old car to a new model is not cost-effective in any real way the only advantage it provides you is the prestige of constantly having a new car at the cost of many hundreds of dollars a month versus using a more cost-effective method of getting around.


    Should I part exchange my old car? #car #hire #comparison


    #part exchange cars
    #

    Should I part exchange my old car?

    A part exchange can be a highly effective method of reducing the cost of buying a new car. Some motorists, however, may not be aware exactly how a part exchange works and whether it s the best move for them.

    Below we take a look at the pros and cons of part exchange and what to do if you decide to exchange your car for a newer model at the dealership.

    What are the pros of part exchanging?

    There are benefits to part exchanging your used car for a new. The obvious one is that the value of your old car will be taken off the price of the new one there and then.

    This means in one visit to the dealership, you can effectively swap cars (for a price). It is the easiest option to replace one car with another.

    It is far less hassle than taking out a classified and dealing with potential buyers who could ultimately decide not to take the car after coming to see it. This is a common occurrence especially when people are searching for cars to buy online.

    Part exchange can be particularly useful if you are downsizing to a smaller car (or engine) because this likely means a larger chunk of the cost of a new car will be taken out by your older model.

    What are the cons of part exchanging?

    Part exchange may be the easiest option, but this can reflected in the price you are offered for the car.

    Using part exchange at a dealership to fund a new car purchase can mean you get a lower price than if you sold the car individually. It also means two sets of negotiation are needed one for the part-exchanged car and one for the new car.

    The best way to avoid potential pitfalls in this regard is to visit a reputable dealership network, such as Perrys, and go with as much information as possible.

    What do I need to know to part exchange my car?

    First of all, the most important thing to know is the value of the car you are currently driving. The internet can be a very useful tool for this, since it s where you can search for similar cars to yours in order to gauge the value of the car.

    Always remember to take into account mileage, service history and the condition of the car the same advice given to anybody about to sell their car.

    By going into the dealership equipped with this information, it allows the seller and the salesperson to reach an agreement much quicker and should ensure a good deal for the seller.

    Of course, you can always walk away if the deal is not satisfactory. Always be prepared to explore other avenues for selling your car if the part exchange deals on offer do not suit you.

    Preparing your car for part exchange

    When intending to part exchange a car, you should have all the documents and paperwork needed in one place. Remember, if the car has a full service history it will increase the value of the car.

    Documents such as the V5C and MoT certificates will be needed just as they would when selling the car privately.

    To help you get the best possible part exchange price give the car a wash. While dealerships will part exchange a dirty car, you should make it as an attractive proposition as possible to improve its chances of being valued at a higher price.

    It may also be cost effective to fix any damage to the car, but this depends on whether you believe the extra value added will be larger than the cost to fix it.

    For instance, scuffs and bumps on the bodywork can be fixed relatively easily. Larger damage to the bodywork on the other hand could cost more to fix than would be taken off the value at the dealership.

    Finally, make sure you take all the keys along with you to hand over if a sufficient part exchange deal takes place.

    How to part exchange your car

    When negotiating with the salesperson about a part exchange price, always have a price in mind and stick to it.

    Obviously, any repair work needed or damage to the car will reduce the price, but this is where prior research will be useful.

    Other things that will reduce the price include an incomplete service history and the lack of an MoT. Most dealerships will check the car mechanically before agreeing to a part exchange, but will drastically reduce the amount offered if the car does not have a valid MoT certificate.

    Finally, it s better to avoid accepting any offers from a dealership if they haven t even seen the car. In this scenario the chances are that this is a particularly low price being offered.

    Can I part exchange a car online?

    Part exchanging is an area in the car buying industry which has grown a lot in the last few years and doing it online is possible. However, like all things related to online car buying and selling, it is not without its pitfalls.

    Websites will generally offer to buy a car at a much lower price than a dealership because they do not actually see the car in advance. It is also important to be wary that some companies might change their valuation when the cars are actually picked up.


    25 Japanese Collectibles You Should Buy Now #day #car #insurance


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    25 Japanese Collectibles You Should Buy Now

    What makes something collectible? Is it an item’s technical or aesthetic value? Perhaps a current or perceived future monetary value? Or could it be a sentimental value? Whether you collect stamps, porcelain pigs or automobiles, it is because these things speak to you on some level, because you enjoy them and they reflect a piece of you. In the world of collecting cars, classic American and European marques have always been treasured for their power, beauty and special character. Yet, to this point, Japanese cars have not enjoyed the same treatment-but as time passes, this will surely change.

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    Small European economy cars from the 1950s like Borgwards, DKWs, Renaults and Opels were often viewed by the World War II veterans, who then constituted the largest number of consumers, as humorous and charming in their day. Looking back, it seems unfortunate, but not unreasonable, that these consumers might vividly recall the aggression of the Japanese during the war, and would treat the newly arriving Japanese cars with caution, if not outright scorn. The Toyopets and Datsuns that came to America in the 1950s and 1960s seemed to reflect a strong national identity through their size, efficiency and careful build, reflecting all that which was “foreign.” To many, these far-eastern cars became threatening “invaders,” while European cars were simply “imports.”

    The emphasis in the collectible automobile world today is on American muscle cars, which are the cars today’s prevailing generation wanted and drove when they were new. With many affluent 50-something baby boomers in a position to purchase a collector car, they turn back to those they looked fondly upon as young people. It is rare to find a Japanese car at a collector car auction; a Datsun 240Z or Nissan 300ZX may cross the block and draw the attention of a few bidders, while the ‘Cuda or 1957 Chevrolet Bel Air that follows it creates a six-figure frenzy.

    Because many of these boomers have driven Japanese cars since the stigma of them being “disposable” disappeared in the 1980s, their children will probably think fondly of the Hondas, Toyotas, Mazdas and Subarus of their youth. The first cars of these 30-somethings and younger people may have been inexpensive Japanese rides, and the luxurious or sporting Japanese cars of the 1980s and 1990s have become aspirational. As the younger generations come into their moneymaking years, they will be the ones to turn the collector car spotlight to Japanese cars.

    Aside from a small handful of sporty models-the original Datsun 240Z, Toyota’s exotic 2000GT coupe and Mazda’s first rotary-powered car, the Cosmo 110S-few Japanese cars are recognized by everyone as collectibles. Of these, only the 2000GT commands serious money. What does this mean for the millions of other technically advanced, sporting and luxurious Japanese cars on our shores? They are surprisingly inexpensive! So whether you’d like to rekindle old memories of a 30-year-old sports coupe or make new ones with a powerful luxury sedan from the 1990s, you can do it on a budget in a Japanese car.

    Here are 25 current collectibles, as chosen by the HS E staff.

    1989-1994 Nissan Maxima SE

    The styling of the third generation Maxima had always been attractive, but in 1992, thanks to the addition of the 190hp, twin-cam V-6 with variable valve timing and direct ignition, the car was a killer. While the 300ZX had become a bloated, fat-Elvis parody of itself, the Maxima was a lithe, sexy sedan, worthy of the 4DSC (four-door sports car) moniker Nissan’s marketing dweebs cooked up. 1991 to 1994 SEs with manual transmissions got a variable induction system’to enhance mid- to high-range power, and if you can live with the 160hp version in 1989–1994 GXEs and 1989–1991 SEs, you’ll have one of the most reliable engines ever built by Nissan, in one of the most attractive Japanese sedans out there. –Craig Fitzgerald

    1992-1997 Subaru SVX

    Permanent all-wheel drive, dramatic looks, excellent road manners, a fully legitimate 2+2 CT coupe, genuinely luxurious. Why did the Subaru SVX struggle to sell? It was simply too radical a departure to attract Subaru’s core audience, and because it wore a Subaru badge, the purists who might otherwise have found it satisfying refused to take the car seriously–it was like Swanson suddenly offering beef Wellington as a frozen TV dinner. Too bad, since the SVX was a highly interesting car with a 3.3-liter, 230hp six-cylinder version of Subaru’s signature horizontally opposed engine architecture. In the end. about 14,000 were sold here before Subaru pulled the plug. –Jim Donnelly

    1970-1978 Mazda RX-2 and RX-3

    These Mazdas were the first mass-marketed rotary-powered cars. They were extremely well built with handsome, sporty styling that incorporated a distinctive grille shape. The RX-2 and RX-3, available in coupe, sedan and station wagon forms, were affordably priced, and had a decent power-to-weight ratio that made them great fun to drive. What other car would allow you to shift at 10,000 rpm, day after day, shift after shift, and not blow itself up? Their very good brakes, reassuring handling, comfortable seats and an excellent HVAC system all helped to make these early Mazdas hallmark cars.–Richard Lentinello

    1993-1995 Mazda RX-7

    1971-1973 Toyota Celica

    1970-1973 Datsun 240Z


    6 Things Every Sucker Should Know Before Buying a Used Car #car #transportation


    #buy a used car
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    6 Things Every Sucker Should Know Before Buying a Used Car

    By Robert Brockway October 25, 2012 1,279,484 Views

    Buying a used car is like going to a dentist who wants to knock out your old teeth and sell you new ones. Everybody involved in the process is assuredly biased, possibly psychotic, and actively wants to do you bodily harm. More sad, dissatisfied people have left car dealerships than strip clubs, and it’s no wonder: Cars are extremely complicated, terribly expensive, and for some reason every one is guarded by a small gang of pathological liars. It’s one of the worst experiences of your life, and you need somebody trustworthy to help you. Unfortunately, you’ve got me. Lucky for you, I have bought and destroyed more cars than is technically allowable by the United States government, and am therefore legally obligated to actually try to help you in this column, which I do as a “service” to the “community.” I think we can get through this, if you take my advice to heart.*

    *Well, except for all the times I tell you to “flip the table on them bitches.” That’s just some good general advice I try to work in everywhere, and may not be applicable to the situation at hand.

    #6. Do Your Research

    Never, ever walk into a dealership “just to see what they’ve got.” Salesmen see that aimless stare on your face and they’re like starving cartoon wolves — they don’t even see a person; all they see is a giant walking turkey leg. Most small and midsize dealerships will have online inventories. Check those out in advance and start looking up the models you’re interested in, then read up on each one: Comb through car sites like Edmunds, click on forum posts by owners, get the specs and find out about users’ experience with reliability — hell, go to Wikipedia and bone up on the entire history of the model and the powertrain you’re considering. Back in school, you’d do the same amount of research for a book report on Huck Finn just because an older lady in a paneled skirt threatened you with the alphabet — you can do the same legwork for a multi-thousand-dollar purchase you’re going to entrust your life to every time you leave the house to get a burrito. Whatever you do, the point is to come in with a mental list: Do not let them steer you outside of that list to a car that you’re not familiar with. Adventure is wondrous and grand, but the used car lot is not the place to listen to strange old men in tattered clothes whisper of magical chariots.

    “It’s dangerous to go alone. Take this Daihatsu!”

    Now this is the important part, so pay attention: No matter what anybody tells you — no matter how respectable the source — never, ever, ever buy the Kia. Regardless of dealership affiliation, every used car lot on the planet has a dull red Kia out back that they want to show you. It’s going to feel wrong, somehow, like the air around it has gone stale. That’s the universe trying to warn you. There will be rational arguments, and your brain is gonna be all like, “Hey, it sounds like they’ve gotten a lot better lately,” and, “Look, even the car magazines think they’ve got some decent models.” But there’s a very simple explanation for this illusion: It’s a vast government conspiracy and everybody is in on it but me. They are terrible cars that will explode and betray you, no matter how meticulously you care for them. Isn’t that right, Optima, you fickle bitch?! You broke my heart! And for what? A measly 15,000 miles? I thought we had something! I spent two years inside of you. Does that mean nothing?!

    #5. Dealing With the Dealer

    You need to treat the first few moments at a dealership like an old-timey mobster being interrogated by the coppers: You don’t say nothin’ about nothin’. Financing? What’s that? Trade-ins? Ha, what a hilarious portmanteau of gibberish! Price range? I don’t even speak English.

    The first step is just and only to find the car you want, go over it carefully, take stock of any work that needs doing, and barter out the final price. Only when that’s all settled do you talk about trading in something. Why would you discuss trade-ins right up front if you haven’t even found a car you like? You’re not even sure you’re shopping there yet. The grocery store doesn’t pull you aside when you walk in the doors and ask how much you’re planning to spend today. So why do dealerships always want to know your price, payment and trades first? Because it gives them leverage against you: “Oh, well, if we’re going to do you a favor and take this trade-in off your hands, you have to buy one of these pre-selected vehicles.” Or, “Oh, you’re financing? Those aren’t our finance cars. Our finance cars are all dull red Kias; let’s go out back and take a look.”

    “Ignore the disembodied voices telling you to flee. That’s a. feature. Ghost-voicing. Costs extra.”

    That’s bullshit. Everything is a finance car. Just like everything is a cash car. The car does not care how you pay for it. It is a car. Even if it becomes sentient, it’s mostly only going to care about fighting crime and ramping shit, like K.I.T.T. from Knight Rider. And brother, if that happens: You let it. You buy yourself a leather jacket and a perm and get the fuck out of there; your car search is over.

    #4. Vehicle Inspection

    There are a few basic things you can check, even if you know nothing about cars. First thing you want to do is get right up close against the side of the front fender. (This should also serve to draw out any potential sentient-car crime-fighting partners, as they cannot resist wisecracking and will likely say something cute like, “Geez, buy me dinner first.” If so, then you’re done: It’s all cowhide coverings and curly hair for the rest of your days.) If there’s little to no rapport between you and the vehicle at this point, just sight down the trim lines to make sure they’re straight with no fluctuations — offset doors, fenders, and uneven lines could indicate frame damage. Look around the engine bay at the spots where the metal struts come together — the joints should be straight, with no signs of recent welding. Take a look underneath the car and watch for rust on the rails, in the wheel wells, or basically anywhere else. Be afraid of rust. Rust is the mind-killer. You’ll think you can take rust — it’s just some pansy little oxidation, right? But you can’t. Rust is better than you. Rust will laugh at your feeble angle grinders; it will spit at your steel wool and mock your puny acids. Rust will shrug off all your mightiest efforts and then, when you are broken, it will take your woman in a way that you never could.

    “F. from behind? I don’t know, man; I’m just a chemical process.”

    Also remember to CHECK. THE. FUCKING. FLUIDS. Don’t just stare at the engine with your dick in your hand, wondering if you could stop the flywheel with your cock (no matter how awesome it would be to seize a V8 with nothing but your willpower and steely erection, this is not the time for it). Pull those dipsticks out and check the reservoirs. Brake fluid is, in an ideal world, clear to slightly yellowish. But the world we live in is broken and flawed, so it’s usually tea-colored. If it looks like strong coffee, you’re going to need to bleed the brake system, at the very least. That’s a few hundred dollars right there. It doesn’t require a lot of know-how or expensive parts, so you’re going to want to do it yourself.

    Do not.

    Bleeding brakes is exactly as traumatic as bleeding your only child, only it takes like, four times as long (depending on size and age of child). Check the oil: If it looks like a Wendy’s chocolate Frosty, just turn around and run. Run as fast as you can. Hop into your car and tear ass out of that dealership like The Dukes of Hazzard. That means a blown head-gasket, and it is death. If somebody assures you, “It’ll still run,” you can respond, “So will a man with no legs, if you shoot at him enough; that doesn’t mean he’ll get far.” (The casual murder references let ’em know you mean business.)

    “Hi, Bob. Nice to meet you. I’ve killed four men. Every one of them stole from me.”

    Make sure the coolant is clear, the transmission fluid is red or purplish (just not black or oily) and all the belts and hoses are free of cracks. Finally, if it’s a new car or a big expense, you buy yourself a copy of a program like Torque, then go on eBay and get an ODBII scanner. Plug that into the car (the ODB slot is usually beneath the dash on the driver’s side) and you can see literally everything about its engine in real time, right there on your smartphone. Do me a favor and look at the salesman’s face when you do it: See that expression? That’s what hope looks like, as it leaves the world. He’s just realized he’s not going to win this one, because you’re from the future — you’ve already done this deal.