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Why You Should Rent vs Own | Phil Town


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Why You Should Rent vs Own | Phil Town


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Car Insurance Rates Mobile Form, what car should i buy.#What #car #should #i #buy


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Car Insurance Rates Mobile Form, what car should i buy.#What #car #should #i #buy


Car Insurance On-The-Go

Comparing car insurance rates online is easier than ever with our handy new mobile app. You can still get the same benefit you get from the normal version of our site by entering your ZIP code above, which will allow you to compare specialized offers from major national insurance providers and local agents in your area. Gone are the days when you had to call one carrier after another – CarInsuranceRates.com has done all the heavy lifting for you! Just enter your ZIP code in the box above to see what our participating providers have in store for you.

Expert Insurance Guides

Need help picking the right options? Not sure what the various industry terms mean? We’ve got your back! CarInsuranceRates.com is chalk-full of helpful guides, useful tips, and article after article of informative information, complete with charts, checklists, and case study to help you make the best decision when selecting your policy type or end-provider.

State-by-State Requirements

Locality is one of the top factors that will influence what you can or can’t do with your car insurance policy. Laws, rules, and regulations changes all the time, and it’s our mission to try and keep you as up-to-date with pertinent information so you can make the right choice when selecting you coverage levels or provider.

Ask a Question, Get an Answer

Still need help getting to the bottom of your insurance situation? We have an easy-to-use library of questions-and-answers from current clients, with a wide range of solutions that even shocks us on occasion. No matter how obscure your query seems to be, don’t fret – we can help point you in the right direction of the information you need.

Visit the Full Site

Is our mobile display just not doing it for you? We have the fully-loaded, live version of our site standing by. Just click the link below to view the site as though you were on a desktop machine.

800 Fifth Avenue, Suite 4100, Seattle, WA 98104



Car Insurance Rates Mobile Form, what car should i buy.#What #car #should #i #buy


Car Insurance On-The-Go

Comparing car insurance rates online is easier than ever with our handy new mobile app. You can still get the same benefit you get from the normal version of our site by entering your ZIP code above, which will allow you to compare specialized offers from major national insurance providers and local agents in your area. Gone are the days when you had to call one carrier after another – CarInsuranceRates.com has done all the heavy lifting for you! Just enter your ZIP code in the box above to see what our participating providers have in store for you.

Expert Insurance Guides

Need help picking the right options? Not sure what the various industry terms mean? We’ve got your back! CarInsuranceRates.com is chalk-full of helpful guides, useful tips, and article after article of informative information, complete with charts, checklists, and case study to help you make the best decision when selecting your policy type or end-provider.

State-by-State Requirements

Locality is one of the top factors that will influence what you can or can’t do with your car insurance policy. Laws, rules, and regulations changes all the time, and it’s our mission to try and keep you as up-to-date with pertinent information so you can make the right choice when selecting you coverage levels or provider.

Ask a Question, Get an Answer

Still need help getting to the bottom of your insurance situation? We have an easy-to-use library of questions-and-answers from current clients, with a wide range of solutions that even shocks us on occasion. No matter how obscure your query seems to be, don’t fret – we can help point you in the right direction of the information you need.

Visit the Full Site

Is our mobile display just not doing it for you? We have the fully-loaded, live version of our site standing by. Just click the link below to view the site as though you were on a desktop machine.

800 Fifth Avenue, Suite 4100, Seattle, WA 98104



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what car should i buy

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What car should i buy



Why You Should NOT Buy a New Car – ReadyForZero Blog #rc #car


#what car should i buy
#

Why You Should NOT Buy a New Car

17 Oct 2012 by Ben

Welcome to the 5th  Smart Money Debate at ReadyForZero . To see the other side  of this debate, read Miranda s post: Why You Should Buy a New Car (Not Used). And then let us know which argument was more convincing!

Buying new things is fun. I love unwrapping the shiny packaging, opening up the box, and smelling the factory made scent of something brand new. There is nothing quite like holding something in your hands that nobody else has ever used. It makes you feel well special.

You know what makes me feel even more special than buying something brand new? Saving money. That is why almost everything I purchase is used. Don t get me wrong I m not one to purchase a used pair of Hanes. However, with most items, you can find great deals if you are willing to buy used. This is especially true when it comes to major purchases like cars.

While I wouldn t recommend buying any old lemon, buying used cars is the only thing that makes sense financially. Our family has purchased new before, and we consider it to be one of the biggest financial mistakes we have ever made. Here is why we will never buy a new car again and neither should you!

Reason #1: New Cars Don t Hold Their Value

We ve all heard this before, but it bears repeating: a new car begins losing value the minute that you drive it off the lot. How much value you ask? According to Edmunds.com, a new car loses approximately 10% of its value as soon as you drive away. 10%. Furthermore, it loses about 20% of its value after the first year, and 10% off the original purchase price per year after that. Depending on the make and model of your new car, you may have lost up to 80% of the value from the purchase price within 5 years!

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Would you invest $25,000 in the stock market if you knew that you were going to lose $2,500 the moment you completed the transaction? Would you buy a house for $200,000 if you knew for a fact that it would only be worth $180,000 the minute you were handed the key and $160,000 a year later. Of course you wouldn t! No sane person would. Why would you do the same thing with a car? Let somebody take that huge financial hit by buying the new car. Then, you can take advantage of their silliness and buy the car used after they trade it in a few years later.

Reason #2: Used Cars are Cheaper

Since new cars are clearly a poor investment, it makes sense that the sticker price for used cars is far less expensive than the newer models. For instance, a brand new 2012 Toyota Prius is currently selling for around $28,500. Earlier this year, we were able to purchase a used 2009 Prius with under 25,000 miles for only $17,500. While red isn t exactly my favorite color, I was happy to suffer through it in order to save $11,000.

Reason #3: Less Worry

You know the nervous feeling that you get when you buy something new? You become very protective of it. You don t want anything to spill or scratch it. You re so proud of it that you want it to stay looking all brand new and shiny for forever. That is why you bought the product new in the first place. Afterall, what good is a new car if it doesn t actually look new.

I hate to tell you this, but eventually everything that is new is going to become blemished. When it does, you may be devastated especially if you spent as much money on it as you would a car. Why not save yourself all of that worry, headache, and stress? Just buy your cars used. A nick, dent, or scratch doesn t seem like such a big deal then.

Reason #4: Warranties are Available

People who tell you to buy a new car will tout the great warranties with which new cars come. Guess what. Most used cars will come with a warranty as well. In fact, the most important warranty the manufacturer s powertrain warranty should still be in effect as long as the car has not exceeded its age or mileage limits. This warranty covers all of the big stuff that might break like your engine or transmission. So, the warranty argument doesn t really hold water. If the warranty is in effect, the argument that you are going to have to pay for more repairs to a used car than you would for a new car doesn t really work either.

Reason #5: A New Car is a Bad Investment

Have I mentioned that a new car loses 10% of its value the moment you drive it off the lot and 20% of its value over the first year alone. Oh, I did? Good. Well, this is so important that I m mentioning it again. If that new car smell is still tempting you, go back and read Reason #1 to help snap you back into reality. Then, go out and buy a New Car Smell air freshener to put in your used car, and save yourself thousands of dollars.

As you can see, buying a new car is not the best decision for your finances. While that new car smell may make you feel like you are loaded, buying a new car is just another way of trying to look wealthy. It is a status symbol that savvy spenders can do without. If you re in the market for a new car, do yourself a favor and buy a used one instead.

No matter what you decide, use ReadyForZero to track your debt payoff it s a free online tool that helps you stay motivated and pay off your debt in the fastest time frame possible.

To see the other side  of this debate, read Miranda s post: Why You Should Buy a New Car (Not Used). And then let us know which argument was more convincing!

This post was published by Ben, Content Manager and Writer for » ReadyForZero. ReadyForZero is a company that helps people get out of debt on their own with a simple and free online tool that can automate and track your debt paydown.



Should I Sell My Car? #nissan #car


#sell my car
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Ask the Readers: Should I Sell My Car?

Published on February 11th, 2011

The Friday Ask the Readers column generally follows a set format: I introduce the topic, share a reader e-mail, give my best advice, and then ask for your feedback. Today s column is a little different. Sarah sent me a 1000-word question, and rather than write any sort of response, I m just going to let her have the entire space. Everything that follows is from Sarah.

I have a question for other GRS readers. It’s a simple question: Should I sell my car? It actually seems to have a very simple answer: Yes.

I keep writing lists and outlining the reasons why I should sell my car (and why I shouldn’t), and the balance lies very clearly in favor of selling my car. And yet I’m having the hardest time selling my car.

Why? I’m a practical, logical, pragmatic person. Why is this so hard to do? Why is selling my car so difficult? Even with the facts laid out, staring me in the face, I’m having the hardest time selling my car.

Why I Bought a Car in the First Place

I used to live completely car-free. I lived in different cities and only walked, bused, or biked to get around occasionally living the high life and taking a taxi when I felt like being luxurious. And then I moved to California.

I bought a car last year. I purchased a 2010 Toyota Matrix from a dealer, priced at $17,490, with a $1000 rebate for being a recent college grad. The Kelly Blue Book value of the car, at new, was $20,049. My purchase price was $16,490. With taxes, registration, and fees, I forked over $19,009. As a somewhat-savvy consumer, I secured a three-year financing plan with 0% interest.

I bought the car because I lived 40 miles from my job, commuting an hour each way (through San Francisco, across the Golden Gate Bridge), and there wasn’t sufficient public transportation to get me to and from my job.

I ve now owned (and paid for) the car for 12 months, spending $6800 on car payments. I have $12,200 left to pay on the car over a two-year period.

The cost of the car has been unbelievable. In one year, these are the costs:

  • Car payments $529 per month
  • 20,000 miles total
    • 25 mpg average
    • gas price is $3.15 in California
    • $2520 for gas, or
    • $210 per month in gasoline
  • Maintenance for one year (four tune-ups at $109 each) $436 ($36 per month for maintenance)
  • Insurance $109 per month for insurance (AAA)
  • Bridge Tolls (crossing the Golden Gate Bridge every day costs $5) $80 per month
  • Parking. I’m lucky to have free parking, mostly, unless I drive downtown $50 per month is my average for parking

Every month, I spend about $1014 on driving and owning the car. $1014! This is roughly one third of my take-home income. What would I do with $1014 per month.

In addition, I have a substantial amount of debt from undergraduate and graduate student loans (in the realm of $80,000) that I’m currently working hard to pay off. The student loan payments are $679 per month. I struggle to make the car payment and the student loan payment each month.

Today: The Current Situation

In November, I moved back to San Francisco, because I couldn’t stand the long commute. Commuting through city traffic is tiring and psychologically draining; I quickly remembered why I dislike driving so much. In contrast, San Francisco is a hub of public transportation options sometimes better or worse, depending on the neighborhood that you live in.

I now live eight miles from my job in Sausalito. The drive takes about 15-20 minutes, depending on traffic. Parking at my job is easy, but parking in San Francisco is a nightmare it can take up to 40 minutes to find a parking spot. I have the option of purchasing a parking spot, but those cost upwards of $300 in a city like San Francisco, and I can’t stomach how much I’m already spending on the car alone.

I now have alterative means for getting to work. For example, I can bike to work a few days per week, depending on the day and the weather. There s also a bus line that goes to and from my work on the hour, and takes about 30-40 minutes to get to work (it doubles my commute time, but I don’t have to worry about parking, driving, or concentrating on the road).

The (Easy) Conclusions

I worry that it’s a mistake to sell my car after owning it for one year. My parents tell me that I should wait it out for the next two years, buckle down, and just finish making the payments because I need a car and can’t possibly live without one. People suggest that it’s foolish to buy a brand new car and sell a car within the first year of ownership.

However, I also think that sunk costs are sunk costs. What I’ve already spent on the car is gone; it s what I spend in the future that s still up for determination. I think it makes sense for me to sell my car.

Here are some reasons I think I should sell my car:

  • Living in a city with ample public transportation, alternative car-sharing options, bicycle riding, and walking makes having a car a luxury, not a necessity.
  • Getting rid of $12,200 of unpaid debt is a good thing.
  • There are additional costs to car ownership insurance, gas, parking, maintenance that will continue to add up over time. (To the tune of about $450 per month.)
  • The current value of my car ($14,000) is more than I owe on my payments ($12,200)
  • But wait! There s more!

    • A car is a depreciating asset, and will not add any value over time. Struggling to make these payments does not help me reduce or eliminate debt in other areas of my life.
  • Public transportation to work costs $4 each way, or approximately $160 per month.
  • If I also choose to use a car-sharing program on the weekends, I would spend between $50 and $75 for a weekend use but the cost would be elective, and not fixed.
  • If I don’t spend the money on the car, I can spend the money on other things that are more important.
  • It seems painfully clear, on paper, that I should sell my car. And yet I get in and drive it every single day to teach swim lesson after work, to dinner parties, to events, on trips to Tahoe, on excursions. I am afraid of selling my car. Psychologically and emotionally, I’m attached to it. I also stubbornly don’t want to admit I made a mistake in buying the car in the first place.

    So tell me, fellow GRS readers, what should I do? Can I afford to sell my car? Can I afford not to?

    J.D. s note: Though I don t have room for my traditional long reply, I ll just chime in to say I m glad that Sarah mentioned sunk costs. That s a very important thing to remember in making these sorts of decisions. (What you ve spent already is irrelevant; it s what you spend going forward that matters.) And I think her situation highlights why it s often best to buy a cheap used car than a brand-new one. I think a $2,000 beater would be perfect for her.

    GRS is committed to helping our readers save and achieve their financial goals. Savings interest rates may be low, but that is all the more reason to shop for the best rate. Find the highest savings interest rates and CD rates from Synchrony Bank. Ally Bank. GE Capital Bank. and more.



    Should You Purchase Rental Car insurance? US News #we #buy #any #car


    #car rental insurance
    #

    Should You Purchase Rental Car insurance?

    You might already be covered for your summer road trip.

    The warm summer weather might have you itching for a road trip. But before you hit the road, you may need to spring for a rental car. And before you do that, you’ll need to decide whether to purchase rental car insurance.

    It’s a tricky decision, given the fact that you may already be covered through your existing car insurance or your credit card. Your personal auto car coverage usually does cover rental car coverage, says Merle Scheiber of the National Association of Insurance Commissioners.

    Through your personal auto car coverage, you’ll want to make sure you have collision coverage, which pays for damages to your vehicle from accidents involving other cars or objects. For people who already have collision coverage on the rental car, getting the rental car insurance policy is a waste of money, says Neil Abrams, an auto rental consultant of Abrams Consulting Group based in Purchase, N.Y. If you don’t have collision coverage, you’ll either have to pay for the rental car insurance or use a credit card to pay for the rental car—one that has rental car insurance built in.

    A number of major credit card providers offer rental auto insurance to cardholders, such as Visa, but certain cards only offer it to elite members, so check with your credit card company first. For example, Visa’s auto rental collision-damage waiver (given to Visa credit card holders) provides reimbursement for damage due to collision or theft up to the actual cash value of most rental vehicles. However, Visa’s coverage kicks in only on theft or damage expenses that are not covered by other insurance or reimbursement. In essence, the credit card acts as a secondary insurer, and it would still be wise to have your own personal auto insurance.

    The benefits of buying insurance from the rental company? It protects you from significant out-of-pocket expenses associated with loss or damage to the vehicle, including theft, says Abrams. Rental car insurance can cost roughly $20 to $40, depending on what plan you select. The collision damage waiver, also known as optional vehicle protection or loss damage waiver, can cost as much as $19 per day and shifts liability for collision damage from the person renting the car to the car rental company. Liability insurance, which provides protection for up to $1 million, costs between $7 and $14 a day. However, your personal auto insurance should already include liability insurance. For an additional $1 to $5 a day, personal accident insurance covers medical and ambulance bills for the driver and passengers in the event of an accident.

    The rental companies are required to provide statutory minimum liability coverage, Abrams says. But in a significant event, that’s not going to do much for you. Statutory minimum liability coverage provides some protection to individuals involved in an accident while driving a rental vehicle—the same minimum coverage that would apply to personal coverage.

    It’s not insurance, in the technical sense, that rental companies offer, Abrams says. Rental companies are not licensed insurance agents in every state. Instead, they offer a protection package. It doesn’t help where clear negligence is involved, Abrams warns. If you leave your car with the engine running and the key in the ignition, and the car disappears, the rental company may have a problem with that.

    Abrams adds that some people are protected through their homeowner’s policy. Home owners can extend the liability when the policyholder is not in their home, i.e. while renting a car. However, the provisions vary from one policy to another, so be sure to check ahead of time.

    Jan Zobel, a tax preparer in Oakland, Calif. rents a car when she travels to Hawaii several times a year. Zobel receives coverage using her American Express card, which charges her $17.95 per rental. I’m not a big AmEx card user, but you can bet that I pay for every rental now with that card, she says.



    When Should You Trade In Your Car? Don – t Listen To What Others Say – Run The Numbers Yourself – The Simple Dollar #car #trawler


    #trade in your car
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    When Should You Trade In Your Car? Don t Listen To What Others Say Run The Numbers Yourself

    The week’s most interesting and impactful posts about financial lifestyle.

    A reader writes in describing a debate she s having with her husband:

    I m not sure but someplace on your site I think I saw something about how often to trade in your old car. Our SUV is a 2005 with 55,000 miles on it. My husband says its time to trade it in. He says the longer we drive it the worse off we will be. I m not so sure. We will pay cash for the difference if we trade. Can you give us any pointers?

    The husband s philosophy, if I understand it correctly, is that the older a car is, the less trade-in value it will have and that s absolutely correct. An older vehicle will have less trade-in value.

    But let s look at some real numbers. Let s look at the trade value of Dodge Durangos (they have a SUV, after all) from 1998 to 2006 and assume the median of the range given.

    A new midrange 2008 Dodge Durango, according to AOL Autos, costs $31,835. Let s just assume this is the price one would have paid in earlier years for a Durango. It may have been less, but probably not significantly so.

    A 2006 Dodge Durango would have been owned for 24 months and would have a cash value of $18,225. This is a total depreciation of $13,610, or $567 a month for the entire time of ownership.

    A 2005 Dodge Durango would have been owned for 36 months and would have a cash value of $14,062.50. This is a total depreciation of $17,772.50, or $493 a month for the entire time of ownership. Over that last twelve month period, the vehicle only depreciated $4,162.50 or $347 a month.

    Let s keep going for two more years so the picture becomes clearer. A 2004 Dodge Durango would have been owned for 48 months and would have a cash value of $12,500. This is a total depreciation of $19,335, or $402 a month. Even more impressive, over that last twelve month period, the vehicle only depreciated $1,562.50 or $130 a month.

    A 2003 Dodge Durango would have been owned for 60 months and would have a cash value of $10,512.50. This is a total depreciation of $21,322.50, or $355 a month. Again, over that last twelve month period, the vehicle only depreciated $1,987.50 or $166 a month.

    What s the meaning of this data? The longer you hold onto a car, the less it depreciates each year, and thus the more cost-effective it becomes. A 2003 Durango has a trade value much less than a 2006 Durango, but if you break it down into the depreciation per month, the person owning the 2003 Durango lost much less money per month than the owner of the 2006 Durango.

    Another thing to notice is that car depreciation is at its worst during the first few years of owning a car. Thus, to maximize the bang for your buck, your best bet is to buy a model three or four years old. That way, it doesn t depreciate thousands of dollars each year you own it.

    What s the conclusion? The best value in cars is buying a late model used and driving it until the repair bills start seriously racking up. This plan minimizes the per-year cost of your car and gives you the most years of cost-effective reliability. If you insist on buying new (not the best move), the more years you drive your older car, the more cost-effective your purchase becomes.

    Upgrading a three year old car to a new model is not cost-effective in any real way the only advantage it provides you is the prestige of constantly having a new car at the cost of many hundreds of dollars a month versus using a more cost-effective method of getting around.



    Should I part exchange my old car? #car #hire #comparison


    #part exchange cars
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    Should I part exchange my old car?

    A part exchange can be a highly effective method of reducing the cost of buying a new car. Some motorists, however, may not be aware exactly how a part exchange works and whether it s the best move for them.

    Below we take a look at the pros and cons of part exchange and what to do if you decide to exchange your car for a newer model at the dealership.

    What are the pros of part exchanging?

    There are benefits to part exchanging your used car for a new. The obvious one is that the value of your old car will be taken off the price of the new one there and then.

    This means in one visit to the dealership, you can effectively swap cars (for a price). It is the easiest option to replace one car with another.

    It is far less hassle than taking out a classified and dealing with potential buyers who could ultimately decide not to take the car after coming to see it. This is a common occurrence especially when people are searching for cars to buy online.

    Part exchange can be particularly useful if you are downsizing to a smaller car (or engine) because this likely means a larger chunk of the cost of a new car will be taken out by your older model.

    What are the cons of part exchanging?

    Part exchange may be the easiest option, but this can reflected in the price you are offered for the car.

    Using part exchange at a dealership to fund a new car purchase can mean you get a lower price than if you sold the car individually. It also means two sets of negotiation are needed one for the part-exchanged car and one for the new car.

    The best way to avoid potential pitfalls in this regard is to visit a reputable dealership network, such as Perrys, and go with as much information as possible.

    What do I need to know to part exchange my car?

    First of all, the most important thing to know is the value of the car you are currently driving. The internet can be a very useful tool for this, since it s where you can search for similar cars to yours in order to gauge the value of the car.

    Always remember to take into account mileage, service history and the condition of the car the same advice given to anybody about to sell their car.

    By going into the dealership equipped with this information, it allows the seller and the salesperson to reach an agreement much quicker and should ensure a good deal for the seller.

    Of course, you can always walk away if the deal is not satisfactory. Always be prepared to explore other avenues for selling your car if the part exchange deals on offer do not suit you.

    Preparing your car for part exchange

    When intending to part exchange a car, you should have all the documents and paperwork needed in one place. Remember, if the car has a full service history it will increase the value of the car.

    Documents such as the V5C and MoT certificates will be needed just as they would when selling the car privately.

    To help you get the best possible part exchange price give the car a wash. While dealerships will part exchange a dirty car, you should make it as an attractive proposition as possible to improve its chances of being valued at a higher price.

    It may also be cost effective to fix any damage to the car, but this depends on whether you believe the extra value added will be larger than the cost to fix it.

    For instance, scuffs and bumps on the bodywork can be fixed relatively easily. Larger damage to the bodywork on the other hand could cost more to fix than would be taken off the value at the dealership.

    Finally, make sure you take all the keys along with you to hand over if a sufficient part exchange deal takes place.

    How to part exchange your car

    When negotiating with the salesperson about a part exchange price, always have a price in mind and stick to it.

    Obviously, any repair work needed or damage to the car will reduce the price, but this is where prior research will be useful.

    Other things that will reduce the price include an incomplete service history and the lack of an MoT. Most dealerships will check the car mechanically before agreeing to a part exchange, but will drastically reduce the amount offered if the car does not have a valid MoT certificate.

    Finally, it s better to avoid accepting any offers from a dealership if they haven t even seen the car. In this scenario the chances are that this is a particularly low price being offered.

    Can I part exchange a car online?

    Part exchanging is an area in the car buying industry which has grown a lot in the last few years and doing it online is possible. However, like all things related to online car buying and selling, it is not without its pitfalls.

    Websites will generally offer to buy a car at a much lower price than a dealership because they do not actually see the car in advance. It is also important to be wary that some companies might change their valuation when the cars are actually picked up.



    25 Japanese Collectibles You Should Buy Now #day #car #insurance


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    25 Japanese Collectibles You Should Buy Now

    What makes something collectible? Is it an item’s technical or aesthetic value? Perhaps a current or perceived future monetary value? Or could it be a sentimental value? Whether you collect stamps, porcelain pigs or automobiles, it is because these things speak to you on some level, because you enjoy them and they reflect a piece of you. In the world of collecting cars, classic American and European marques have always been treasured for their power, beauty and special character. Yet, to this point, Japanese cars have not enjoyed the same treatment-but as time passes, this will surely change.

    Article continues after advertisement

    Small European economy cars from the 1950s like Borgwards, DKWs, Renaults and Opels were often viewed by the World War II veterans, who then constituted the largest number of consumers, as humorous and charming in their day. Looking back, it seems unfortunate, but not unreasonable, that these consumers might vividly recall the aggression of the Japanese during the war, and would treat the newly arriving Japanese cars with caution, if not outright scorn. The Toyopets and Datsuns that came to America in the 1950s and 1960s seemed to reflect a strong national identity through their size, efficiency and careful build, reflecting all that which was “foreign.” To many, these far-eastern cars became threatening “invaders,” while European cars were simply “imports.”

    The emphasis in the collectible automobile world today is on American muscle cars, which are the cars today’s prevailing generation wanted and drove when they were new. With many affluent 50-something baby boomers in a position to purchase a collector car, they turn back to those they looked fondly upon as young people. It is rare to find a Japanese car at a collector car auction; a Datsun 240Z or Nissan 300ZX may cross the block and draw the attention of a few bidders, while the ‘Cuda or 1957 Chevrolet Bel Air that follows it creates a six-figure frenzy.

    Because many of these boomers have driven Japanese cars since the stigma of them being “disposable” disappeared in the 1980s, their children will probably think fondly of the Hondas, Toyotas, Mazdas and Subarus of their youth. The first cars of these 30-somethings and younger people may have been inexpensive Japanese rides, and the luxurious or sporting Japanese cars of the 1980s and 1990s have become aspirational. As the younger generations come into their moneymaking years, they will be the ones to turn the collector car spotlight to Japanese cars.

    Aside from a small handful of sporty models-the original Datsun 240Z, Toyota’s exotic 2000GT coupe and Mazda’s first rotary-powered car, the Cosmo 110S-few Japanese cars are recognized by everyone as collectibles. Of these, only the 2000GT commands serious money. What does this mean for the millions of other technically advanced, sporting and luxurious Japanese cars on our shores? They are surprisingly inexpensive! So whether you’d like to rekindle old memories of a 30-year-old sports coupe or make new ones with a powerful luxury sedan from the 1990s, you can do it on a budget in a Japanese car.

    Here are 25 current collectibles, as chosen by the HS E staff.

    1989-1994 Nissan Maxima SE

    The styling of the third generation Maxima had always been attractive, but in 1992, thanks to the addition of the 190hp, twin-cam V-6 with variable valve timing and direct ignition, the car was a killer. While the 300ZX had become a bloated, fat-Elvis parody of itself, the Maxima was a lithe, sexy sedan, worthy of the 4DSC (four-door sports car) moniker Nissan’s marketing dweebs cooked up. 1991 to 1994 SEs with manual transmissions got a variable induction system’to enhance mid- to high-range power, and if you can live with the 160hp version in 1989–1994 GXEs and 1989–1991 SEs, you’ll have one of the most reliable engines ever built by Nissan, in one of the most attractive Japanese sedans out there. –Craig Fitzgerald

    1992-1997 Subaru SVX

    Permanent all-wheel drive, dramatic looks, excellent road manners, a fully legitimate 2+2 CT coupe, genuinely luxurious. Why did the Subaru SVX struggle to sell? It was simply too radical a departure to attract Subaru’s core audience, and because it wore a Subaru badge, the purists who might otherwise have found it satisfying refused to take the car seriously–it was like Swanson suddenly offering beef Wellington as a frozen TV dinner. Too bad, since the SVX was a highly interesting car with a 3.3-liter, 230hp six-cylinder version of Subaru’s signature horizontally opposed engine architecture. In the end. about 14,000 were sold here before Subaru pulled the plug. –Jim Donnelly

    1970-1978 Mazda RX-2 and RX-3

    These Mazdas were the first mass-marketed rotary-powered cars. They were extremely well built with handsome, sporty styling that incorporated a distinctive grille shape. The RX-2 and RX-3, available in coupe, sedan and station wagon forms, were affordably priced, and had a decent power-to-weight ratio that made them great fun to drive. What other car would allow you to shift at 10,000 rpm, day after day, shift after shift, and not blow itself up? Their very good brakes, reassuring handling, comfortable seats and an excellent HVAC system all helped to make these early Mazdas hallmark cars.–Richard Lentinello

    1993-1995 Mazda RX-7

    1971-1973 Toyota Celica

    1970-1973 Datsun 240Z



    6 Things Every Sucker Should Know Before Buying a Used Car #car #transportation


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    6 Things Every Sucker Should Know Before Buying a Used Car

    By Robert Brockway October 25, 2012 1,279,484 Views

    Buying a used car is like going to a dentist who wants to knock out your old teeth and sell you new ones. Everybody involved in the process is assuredly biased, possibly psychotic, and actively wants to do you bodily harm. More sad, dissatisfied people have left car dealerships than strip clubs, and it’s no wonder: Cars are extremely complicated, terribly expensive, and for some reason every one is guarded by a small gang of pathological liars. It’s one of the worst experiences of your life, and you need somebody trustworthy to help you. Unfortunately, you’ve got me. Lucky for you, I have bought and destroyed more cars than is technically allowable by the United States government, and am therefore legally obligated to actually try to help you in this column, which I do as a “service” to the “community.” I think we can get through this, if you take my advice to heart.*

    *Well, except for all the times I tell you to “flip the table on them bitches.” That’s just some good general advice I try to work in everywhere, and may not be applicable to the situation at hand.

    #6. Do Your Research

    Never, ever walk into a dealership “just to see what they’ve got.” Salesmen see that aimless stare on your face and they’re like starving cartoon wolves — they don’t even see a person; all they see is a giant walking turkey leg. Most small and midsize dealerships will have online inventories. Check those out in advance and start looking up the models you’re interested in, then read up on each one: Comb through car sites like Edmunds, click on forum posts by owners, get the specs and find out about users’ experience with reliability — hell, go to Wikipedia and bone up on the entire history of the model and the powertrain you’re considering. Back in school, you’d do the same amount of research for a book report on Huck Finn just because an older lady in a paneled skirt threatened you with the alphabet — you can do the same legwork for a multi-thousand-dollar purchase you’re going to entrust your life to every time you leave the house to get a burrito. Whatever you do, the point is to come in with a mental list: Do not let them steer you outside of that list to a car that you’re not familiar with. Adventure is wondrous and grand, but the used car lot is not the place to listen to strange old men in tattered clothes whisper of magical chariots.

    “It’s dangerous to go alone. Take this Daihatsu!”

    Now this is the important part, so pay attention: No matter what anybody tells you — no matter how respectable the source — never, ever, ever buy the Kia. Regardless of dealership affiliation, every used car lot on the planet has a dull red Kia out back that they want to show you. It’s going to feel wrong, somehow, like the air around it has gone stale. That’s the universe trying to warn you. There will be rational arguments, and your brain is gonna be all like, “Hey, it sounds like they’ve gotten a lot better lately,” and, “Look, even the car magazines think they’ve got some decent models.” But there’s a very simple explanation for this illusion: It’s a vast government conspiracy and everybody is in on it but me. They are terrible cars that will explode and betray you, no matter how meticulously you care for them. Isn’t that right, Optima, you fickle bitch?! You broke my heart! And for what? A measly 15,000 miles? I thought we had something! I spent two years inside of you. Does that mean nothing?!

    #5. Dealing With the Dealer

    You need to treat the first few moments at a dealership like an old-timey mobster being interrogated by the coppers: You don’t say nothin’ about nothin’. Financing? What’s that? Trade-ins? Ha, what a hilarious portmanteau of gibberish! Price range? I don’t even speak English.

    The first step is just and only to find the car you want, go over it carefully, take stock of any work that needs doing, and barter out the final price. Only when that’s all settled do you talk about trading in something. Why would you discuss trade-ins right up front if you haven’t even found a car you like? You’re not even sure you’re shopping there yet. The grocery store doesn’t pull you aside when you walk in the doors and ask how much you’re planning to spend today. So why do dealerships always want to know your price, payment and trades first? Because it gives them leverage against you: “Oh, well, if we’re going to do you a favor and take this trade-in off your hands, you have to buy one of these pre-selected vehicles.” Or, “Oh, you’re financing? Those aren’t our finance cars. Our finance cars are all dull red Kias; let’s go out back and take a look.”

    “Ignore the disembodied voices telling you to flee. That’s a. feature. Ghost-voicing. Costs extra.”

    That’s bullshit. Everything is a finance car. Just like everything is a cash car. The car does not care how you pay for it. It is a car. Even if it becomes sentient, it’s mostly only going to care about fighting crime and ramping shit, like K.I.T.T. from Knight Rider. And brother, if that happens: You let it. You buy yourself a leather jacket and a perm and get the fuck out of there; your car search is over.

    #4. Vehicle Inspection

    There are a few basic things you can check, even if you know nothing about cars. First thing you want to do is get right up close against the side of the front fender. (This should also serve to draw out any potential sentient-car crime-fighting partners, as they cannot resist wisecracking and will likely say something cute like, “Geez, buy me dinner first.” If so, then you’re done: It’s all cowhide coverings and curly hair for the rest of your days.) If there’s little to no rapport between you and the vehicle at this point, just sight down the trim lines to make sure they’re straight with no fluctuations — offset doors, fenders, and uneven lines could indicate frame damage. Look around the engine bay at the spots where the metal struts come together — the joints should be straight, with no signs of recent welding. Take a look underneath the car and watch for rust on the rails, in the wheel wells, or basically anywhere else. Be afraid of rust. Rust is the mind-killer. You’ll think you can take rust — it’s just some pansy little oxidation, right? But you can’t. Rust is better than you. Rust will laugh at your feeble angle grinders; it will spit at your steel wool and mock your puny acids. Rust will shrug off all your mightiest efforts and then, when you are broken, it will take your woman in a way that you never could.

    “F. from behind? I don’t know, man; I’m just a chemical process.”

    Also remember to CHECK. THE. FUCKING. FLUIDS. Don’t just stare at the engine with your dick in your hand, wondering if you could stop the flywheel with your cock (no matter how awesome it would be to seize a V8 with nothing but your willpower and steely erection, this is not the time for it). Pull those dipsticks out and check the reservoirs. Brake fluid is, in an ideal world, clear to slightly yellowish. But the world we live in is broken and flawed, so it’s usually tea-colored. If it looks like strong coffee, you’re going to need to bleed the brake system, at the very least. That’s a few hundred dollars right there. It doesn’t require a lot of know-how or expensive parts, so you’re going to want to do it yourself.

    Do not.

    Bleeding brakes is exactly as traumatic as bleeding your only child, only it takes like, four times as long (depending on size and age of child). Check the oil: If it looks like a Wendy’s chocolate Frosty, just turn around and run. Run as fast as you can. Hop into your car and tear ass out of that dealership like The Dukes of Hazzard. That means a blown head-gasket, and it is death. If somebody assures you, “It’ll still run,” you can respond, “So will a man with no legs, if you shoot at him enough; that doesn’t mean he’ll get far.” (The casual murder references let ’em know you mean business.)

    “Hi, Bob. Nice to meet you. I’ve killed four men. Every one of them stole from me.”

    Make sure the coolant is clear, the transmission fluid is red or purplish (just not black or oily) and all the belts and hoses are free of cracks. Finally, if it’s a new car or a big expense, you buy yourself a copy of a program like Torque, then go on eBay and get an ODBII scanner. Plug that into the car (the ODB slot is usually beneath the dash on the driver’s side) and you can see literally everything about its engine in real time, right there on your smartphone. Do me a favor and look at the salesman’s face when you do it: See that expression? That’s what hope looks like, as it leaves the world. He’s just realized he’s not going to win this one, because you’re from the future — you’ve already done this deal.



    Should you buy a used car? #car #decals


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    Should you buy a used car?

    By Aaron Gold. Cars Expert

    Aaron Gold, About.com s Cars Expert, has been an automotive journalist for a decade and a half and has been writing for About.com since 2004. He contributes to several automotive publications and is a member of the North American Car and Truck of the Year jury.

    Continue Reading Below

    The same car for less money

    When you buy used, you miss out on the heaviest depreciation hit. A new entry-level Honda Accord will set you back around $25,000. Buy a similarly-equipped two-year-old Accord with 24,000 miles and you ll pay about $6,000 less. (And that s for a car that holds its value well. A Chevrolet Malibu costs about the same as an Accord; 2 years and 24,000 miles later it s $10,000 cheaper.)

    More car for the same money

    A new mid-level Toyota Corolla  will set you back around $21,000.

    But what if you want something bigger? For the same amount of money, you could buy a two-year-old top-of-the-line Toyota Camry  with a leather interior. Planning on growing your family? You ll find plenty of four-year-old HSUVs and minivans in the new Corolla s price range.

    You can also move up in prestige. A new Toyota Camry XLE V6 with all the bells and whistles is a nice ride; at $35,000 it had better be. But for the same price (or even a couple grand less), you could be stylin in a two-year-old Lexus ES. Audi A6 or BMW 3-series .

    Continue Reading Below

    Certified pre-owned (CPO): Used cars with new benefits

    More and more manufacturers offer certified pre-owned programs. Cars sold as certified pre-owned (CPO) bridge the gap between new and used. They are subject to a rigorous inspection and repair process, and usually are covered by a warranty from the manufacturer. CPO cars will usually cost more than non-CPO cars, but the added warranty and peace of mind makes them a good value.

    Why not buy used?

    Are there disadvantages to buying used? Definitely. New cars are covered by a comprehensive zero-deductable warranty; if your used car breaks, you will have to pay for repairs (or a deductible if you buy an extended warranty ). Also, a used car will need wear items, such as tires and brakes, replaced sooner than a new car, items that are usually not covered under warranty. And most cars require rather expensive servicing around the 50,000 and 100,000 mile marks; a used car will be closer to those intervals. (See my tips for keeping your car running forever .) If you re looking at lowering your overall costs, rather than just your purchase costs, you may be better off with an inexpensive new car .

    Financing is generally more expensive for used cars (though this may be offset by cheaper insurance rates), and if you prefer to lease. a used car probably isn t a viable option. By buying a used car, you may be missing out on some of the latest-and-greatest safety and technical gadgets. And, of course, there s that new car smell. Let s face it: Having a new car is a great feeling.

    In the end, all of these things have a price, often several thousand dollars. Is it worth it? That s up to you — but if you re looking to stretch your car-buying dollar as far as possible, buying used is a sensible option.



    Should you pay for rent-a-car insurance? Travel – Travel Tips #car #for #sale #used


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    You might already be covered, experts say, so do your homework

    updated 2/24/2008 5:09:19 PM ET 2008-02-24T22:09:19

    Q: Does it make sense to purchase insurance when I rent a car, or am I already covered?

    A: With so many options at the car rental counter, it may be tempting to buy whatever insurance protection is available to safeguard your trip. But many travelers don’t realize they’re more than likely duplicating coverage they already have.

    Not only does a driver’s insurance policy protect against theft or damages to a rental vehicle, but often so does a major credit card used to pay the rental fee.

    The best thing to do is to call your insurance agent and credit card company in advance. Just because you’ve used a gold or platinum card in the past, don’t assume that it still offers the same protection plans — the cards’ insurance benefits can change.

    “More often, these prestigious cards are starting to change the advantages they offer to their cardholders, and often times the cardholders are unaware,” said Carolyn Gorman, vice president of the Insurance Information Institute in New York. “You could be driving uninsured and not even know it, until you get into a bad accident and have no insurance to cover you. It’s a dangerous, scary thing.”

    If you’re not insured through a policy or credit card, the long list of available options can seem intimidating, with dozens of plans that can add as much as an additional $40 a day.

    “This is just a classic way for these companies to make more money,” said Greg Daugherty, an executive editor at Consumer Reports magazine. “This is usually money that people are spending unnecessarily.”



    Should You Sell or Trade in Your Vehicle? #car #insurance #quotes #comparison


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    Should You Sell or Trade in Your Vehicle?

    You need to consider the tax impact of selling your vehicle outright and buying another vehicle in a separate transaction or trading in your old vehicle for another.

    Personal-use Property vs Business-use Property

    Keep in mind, a loss incurred on the disposal of personal-use property is not deductible unless the loss was the result of a casualty or theft. However, a gain on the disposal of personal-use property is taxable.

    A loss on the disposal of business-use property, on the other hand, is deductible and a gain is taxable.

    For example, say you sold a vehicle that you used 80% for business and 20% for personal use and that you incurred a loss. You may deduct 80% of the loss against business income. The other 20% related to personal use is not deductible.

    If you sold the vehicle at a gain (which is unlikely), and used the vehicle 80% for business and 20% for personal use, 100% of the gain is taxable.

    When disposing of your old vehicle and buying a replacement, you can elect to treat the transaction as either a taxable sale or nontaxable exchange.

    Taxable Sale:

    • This is when you sell your old vehicle in one transaction, then buy another one in a separate transaction.

    Nontaxable Exchange:

    • This is when you trade-in your old vehicle for a replacement.

    Taxable Sale of a Car Used for Business

    If a loss would result if you sold your old vehicle, you’re better off just selling it outright rather than trading it in because you can deduct the loss in the year of sale and reduce your taxes.

    A loss would occur if the adjusted basis of old vehicle exceeds what you could sell it for (its fair market value).

    Nontaxable Exchange (trade-in old vehicle)

    When You Should Trade In Your Vehicle:

    • If a gain would result if you sold your old vehicle outright, you’re better off trading it in. This is because you can defer (postpone) reporting the gain by trading it in (exchanging it) for another vehicle. You don’t report the gain on a trade-in.

    A gain occurs if.

    • the fair market value of what you receive exceeds the adjusted basis of the vehicle you trade in plus any additional amount you pay for the new vehicle.

    Example:

    • You trade in your old vehicle with an adjusted basis of $3,000.
    • The fair market value (FMV) of the new vehicle is $7,500.
    • The dealer allows a $3,500 trade-in allowance for your old vehicle.
    • You pay $4,000 cash for the new vehicle (FMV of new vehicle $7,500 minus $3,500 trade-in allowance).

    Your gain is $500 .

    Figured as follows:

    • FMV of $7,500 (new vehicle) minus
    • $7,000 ($3,000 adjusted basis of your old vehicle plus
    • $4,000 cash you paid) equals
    • $500 gain.

    The depreciable basis of the new vehicle is $7,000 .

    Figured as follows:

    • Cash you paid, $4,000 plus
    • Adjusted basis of the old vehicle, $3,000.

    The $500 gain on the trade-in is deferred because it reduces the basis of the new vehicle. If you sold the new vehicle the next day for $7,500, you would recognize the $500 gain at that time ($7,500 minus your adjusted basis of $7,000).



    Should I Buy a New or Used Car, Or Should I Lease? Allstate #what #is #the #value #of #my #car


    #buy a used car
    #

    Picking a Car: Should I Buy a New or Used Car

    Car shopping can be confusing, to say the least. Should you buy a new car, a used car, or does a lease make the most sense for your situation? We’ll look at the pros and cons of each option to help you make an informed decision.

    No matter what you end up buying, you’ll need insurance it’s mandatory in most states and a smart idea, period. At Allstate, we have 15 auto insurance discounts to help you save.

    New Cars

    The Benefits of Buying a New Car

    In addition to that new car smell, buying a new vehicle lets you choose exactly the car you want. You’re also getting the latest automotive and technological advancements. That’s great when you’re just talking about something optional, like an in-dash GPS unit with the latest bells and whistles. But it’s even more important when it comes to safety features, like airbags or electronic stability systems.

    And while new cars can be more expensive, the Internet has made it easier than ever to track manufacturer and dealer incentives like rebates and low-interest financing.

    New cars are less likely to need mechanic visits, which may offer additional peace of mind, especially since many car companies cover repair costs as part of the new car’s warranty. Find out more about auto warranty features and limitations in our What’s In a New Car Warranty article .

    Check out our Bumper-to-Bumper Basics tool for information about factors in your lifestyle that can influence your auto insurance decision.

    And for tips on squeezing every last mile from your gas tank, read our tips for increasing your gas mileage .



    Should You Sell or Trade in Your Vehicle? #car #insurances


    #trade in cars
    #

    Should You Sell or Trade in Your Vehicle?

    You need to consider the tax impact of selling your vehicle outright and buying another vehicle in a separate transaction or trading in your old vehicle for another.

    Personal-use Property vs Business-use Property

    Keep in mind, a loss incurred on the disposal of personal-use property is not deductible unless the loss was the result of a casualty or theft. However, a gain on the disposal of personal-use property is taxable.

    A loss on the disposal of business-use property, on the other hand, is deductible and a gain is taxable.

    For example, say you sold a vehicle that you used 80% for business and 20% for personal use and that you incurred a loss. You may deduct 80% of the loss against business income. The other 20% related to personal use is not deductible.

    If you sold the vehicle at a gain (which is unlikely), and used the vehicle 80% for business and 20% for personal use, 100% of the gain is taxable.

    When disposing of your old vehicle and buying a replacement, you can elect to treat the transaction as either a taxable sale or nontaxable exchange.

    Taxable Sale:

    • This is when you sell your old vehicle in one transaction, then buy another one in a separate transaction.

    Nontaxable Exchange:

    • This is when you trade-in your old vehicle for a replacement.

    Taxable Sale of a Car Used for Business

    If a loss would result if you sold your old vehicle, you’re better off just selling it outright rather than trading it in because you can deduct the loss in the year of sale and reduce your taxes.

    A loss would occur if the adjusted basis of old vehicle exceeds what you could sell it for (its fair market value).

    Nontaxable Exchange (trade-in old vehicle)

    When You Should Trade In Your Vehicle:

    • If a gain would result if you sold your old vehicle outright, you’re better off trading it in. This is because you can defer (postpone) reporting the gain by trading it in (exchanging it) for another vehicle. You don’t report the gain on a trade-in.

    A gain occurs if.

    • the fair market value of what you receive exceeds the adjusted basis of the vehicle you trade in plus any additional amount you pay for the new vehicle.

    Example:

    • You trade in your old vehicle with an adjusted basis of $3,000.
    • The fair market value (FMV) of the new vehicle is $7,500.
    • The dealer allows a $3,500 trade-in allowance for your old vehicle.
    • You pay $4,000 cash for the new vehicle (FMV of new vehicle $7,500 minus $3,500 trade-in allowance).

    Your gain is $500 .

    Figured as follows:

    • FMV of $7,500 (new vehicle) minus
    • $7,000 ($3,000 adjusted basis of your old vehicle plus
    • $4,000 cash you paid) equals
    • $500 gain.

    The depreciable basis of the new vehicle is $7,000 .

    Figured as follows:

    • Cash you paid, $4,000 plus
    • Adjusted basis of the old vehicle, $3,000.

    The $500 gain on the trade-in is deferred because it reduces the basis of the new vehicle. If you sold the new vehicle the next day for $7,500, you would recognize the $500 gain at that time ($7,500 minus your adjusted basis of $7,000).



    Why You Should NOT Buy a New Car – ReadyForZero Blog #rental #car #cheap


    #what car should i buy
    #

    Why You Should NOT Buy a New Car

    17 Oct 2012 by Ben

    Welcome to the 5th  Smart Money Debate at ReadyForZero . To see the other side  of this debate, read Miranda s post: Why You Should Buy a New Car (Not Used). And then let us know which argument was more convincing!

    Buying new things is fun. I love unwrapping the shiny packaging, opening up the box, and smelling the factory made scent of something brand new. There is nothing quite like holding something in your hands that nobody else has ever used. It makes you feel well special.

    You know what makes me feel even more special than buying something brand new? Saving money. That is why almost everything I purchase is used. Don t get me wrong I m not one to purchase a used pair of Hanes. However, with most items, you can find great deals if you are willing to buy used. This is especially true when it comes to major purchases like cars.

    While I wouldn t recommend buying any old lemon, buying used cars is the only thing that makes sense financially. Our family has purchased new before, and we consider it to be one of the biggest financial mistakes we have ever made. Here is why we will never buy a new car again and neither should you!

    Reason #1: New Cars Don t Hold Their Value

    We ve all heard this before, but it bears repeating: a new car begins losing value the minute that you drive it off the lot. How much value you ask? According to Edmunds.com, a new car loses approximately 10% of its value as soon as you drive away. 10%. Furthermore, it loses about 20% of its value after the first year, and 10% off the original purchase price per year after that. Depending on the make and model of your new car, you may have lost up to 80% of the value from the purchase price within 5 years!

    Get offers for lower-interest rate debt consolidation loans here on ReadyForZero!

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    Would you invest $25,000 in the stock market if you knew that you were going to lose $2,500 the moment you completed the transaction? Would you buy a house for $200,000 if you knew for a fact that it would only be worth $180,000 the minute you were handed the key and $160,000 a year later. Of course you wouldn t! No sane person would. Why would you do the same thing with a car? Let somebody take that huge financial hit by buying the new car. Then, you can take advantage of their silliness and buy the car used after they trade it in a few years later.

    Reason #2: Used Cars are Cheaper

    Since new cars are clearly a poor investment, it makes sense that the sticker price for used cars is far less expensive than the newer models. For instance, a brand new 2012 Toyota Prius is currently selling for around $28,500. Earlier this year, we were able to purchase a used 2009 Prius with under 25,000 miles for only $17,500. While red isn t exactly my favorite color, I was happy to suffer through it in order to save $11,000.

    Reason #3: Less Worry

    You know the nervous feeling that you get when you buy something new? You become very protective of it. You don t want anything to spill or scratch it. You re so proud of it that you want it to stay looking all brand new and shiny for forever. That is why you bought the product new in the first place. Afterall, what good is a new car if it doesn t actually look new.

    I hate to tell you this, but eventually everything that is new is going to become blemished. When it does, you may be devastated especially if you spent as much money on it as you would a car. Why not save yourself all of that worry, headache, and stress? Just buy your cars used. A nick, dent, or scratch doesn t seem like such a big deal then.

    Reason #4: Warranties are Available

    People who tell you to buy a new car will tout the great warranties with which new cars come. Guess what. Most used cars will come with a warranty as well. In fact, the most important warranty the manufacturer s powertrain warranty should still be in effect as long as the car has not exceeded its age or mileage limits. This warranty covers all of the big stuff that might break like your engine or transmission. So, the warranty argument doesn t really hold water. If the warranty is in effect, the argument that you are going to have to pay for more repairs to a used car than you would for a new car doesn t really work either.

    Reason #5: A New Car is a Bad Investment

    Have I mentioned that a new car loses 10% of its value the moment you drive it off the lot and 20% of its value over the first year alone. Oh, I did? Good. Well, this is so important that I m mentioning it again. If that new car smell is still tempting you, go back and read Reason #1 to help snap you back into reality. Then, go out and buy a New Car Smell air freshener to put in your used car, and save yourself thousands of dollars.

    As you can see, buying a new car is not the best decision for your finances. While that new car smell may make you feel like you are loaded, buying a new car is just another way of trying to look wealthy. It is a status symbol that savvy spenders can do without. If you re in the market for a new car, do yourself a favor and buy a used one instead.

    No matter what you decide, use ReadyForZero to track your debt payoff it s a free online tool that helps you stay motivated and pay off your debt in the fastest time frame possible.

    To see the other side  of this debate, read Miranda s post: Why You Should Buy a New Car (Not Used). And then let us know which argument was more convincing!

    This post was published by Ben, Content Manager and Writer for » ReadyForZero. ReadyForZero is a company that helps people get out of debt on their own with a simple and free online tool that can automate and track your debt paydown.



    What car should I buy? #remote #control #car


    #what car should i buy
    #

    What car should I buy?

    I want: 4 door, AWD, 6 speed manual (needed for engine braking on ice — no paddle shifters!), 270 horsepower, and heated leather seats. Any suggestions?

    Sounds like a recipe for success on our end: Combine ample power, rowing your own gears and all-wheel drive to get that power to the ground in any weather. There are three new cars that fit your criteria. All are $40,000-plus:

    BMW 335xi sedan (MSRP: $40,800)

    • AWD
    • 6-speed manual
    • 300-hp, twin-turbocharged 3.0-liter inline six
    • Leather seats standard
    • Heated front leather seats are optional ($500). (no heated rear seats)
    • All-season tires
    • 16/25 mpg city/highway

    Audi S4 (MSRP: $48,610)

    • AWD
    • 6-speed manual
    • 340 horsepower 4.2-liter V-8
    • Leather seats standard
    • Heated front and rear leather seats are grouped into convenience package ($2,125)
    • Summer-only tires
    • 13/20 mpg city/highway

    BWM 535xi (MSRP: $51,600)

    • AWD
    • 6-speed manual
    • 300-hp, twin-turbocharged 3.0-liter inline six
    • Leather seats standard
    • Heated front leather seats are optional ($500).
    • Heated rear leather seats are optional ($350).
    • All-season tires
    • 16/25 mpg city/highway

    For your criteria, the BMWs are favorable because they include all-season tires as standard equipment while the Audi S4 has summer-only tires. We haven’t tested the larger 535xi, but the 335 is continually one of our favorite midsize luxury cars; it’s cheaper than the Audi S4 and also has better fuel economy ratings. The S4 has more of a performance edge, though, which is reflected in the choice of standard summer-only tires. If winter driving is a must, which it sounds like it is if you’re concerned about driving on ice, then the BMWs would be a better choice so you don’t have to buy a separate set of tires to get around during the winter months.



    Should I Sell My Car On eBay? #car #price


    #selling a car
    #

    Should I Sell My Car On eBay?

    Published on August 3rd, 2010

    Over the last few months, I ve spent countless hours researching the process of selling items online for a large project I ve been compiling. It s taught me that as much as I thought I knew about selling online, there s so much more that I have no clue about!

    For example, a family member recently asked for my help selling an unneeded car on the internet. Sure! was my first thought. Heck, maybe I ll even use this as a case study! However, there s one major problem with this situation: I m completely ignorant when it comes to cars.

    Actually, I shouldn t say completely ignorant. That s not correct. I m inexcusably ignorant when it comes to cars.

    As a younger member of the male population of American society, I feel like I ve failed to inherit this basic knowledge that was supposed to written into my DNA. In fact, my inability to prioritize the maintenance and regular care of my own car is likely one of my biggest financial weaknesses. Maybe that s one reason I enjoyed our recent year without owning any vehicle at all!

    Even with this blatant gap in knowledge, I actually have had some success selling cars online through Craigslist. Before we left for our year abroad, we sold both of our cars using their online classifieds. However, those were a couple of clunkers. If I remember correctly, we sold one for $1,000 and one for $2,000 after negotiations.

    Because we were leaving, our priority was to just get our cars sold. We didn t want to give the cars away for free, but we weren t trying to squeeze out an extra 10% or additional $100. We were more concerned with not being stuck with a set of wheels parked in Indiana while our bodies were in New Zealand!

    The situation with this car is different. The family member I m assisting doesn t need to sell the car he wants to sell the car. He has no delusions about getting top retail dollar, but is willing to take the time to obtain a fair private-party offer.

    Plus, this isn t anything close to a clunker. It s a 2003 Honda Accord EX Coupe. It s been driven 150,000 miles, but still has only a few minor bumps, blemishes, or flaws. It runs very smoothly and has been taken care of by someone more responsible than me for the majority of its years!

    Giving eBay Motors a fair shake

    Normally, I d take the same approach with this car as I have with the others I ve sold. I d take plenty of photos, research the competition, and write a detailed description. I d present the price and the process for getting more information in a firm, but politely worded manner. I d then upload the info to Craigslist and wait for the phone to ring!

    In other words, normally I would never give eBay a passing glance. I know that for the last few years they ve had some form of classified through what used to be Kijiji.com. but for one reason or another I never considered it a viable option. I ve also heard stories of people buying and selling cars through traditional eBay auctions (non-classified formats), but that process seems too risky and intimidating.

    Recently, however, eBay has started a huge push on its newly re-branded classified section, eBayClassifieds.com. They re heavily promoting this, and they seem to be incorporating the classified listings much more fluidly with the general automobile searches for the main site. Classified listings within a certain distance (200 miles by default) are now included alongside the national listing in searches when logged into your eBay account.

    In addition, constructing a classified ad in eBay has several benefits over its competitors. It s a more guided process, with eBay providing reminders and recommendations along the way. For example, they supply a fantastic, printable Sell Your Car Checklist [219kb PDF] to help gather everything you ll need to create a detailed listing. Currently, your first six classified ads in the eBay Motors section are free during a 12-month period.

    The process of creating a classified ad to sell a car is so smooth that, for the first time, I m going to construct my classified ad in eBay first. I ll then take my description, pictures, and relevant details, and copy them into my trusty Craigslist format, as well. The more I research and tinker with eBay s classified section, the more I m starting to view this as a necessary part of giving the car adequate online exposure.

    Step it up with a national auction?

    Selling via a classified ad isn t the only way you can list your car on eBay. You also have the option to list it through the eBay Motors site under a standard auction format. With classifieds, you list your contact information and have to work out the details of the transaction with potential buyers (just as if you were listing on Craigslist). However, using eBay s standard auction format, interested parties from all of the U.S. can view and place bids on your vehicle, just like they would any other item on eBay.

    Currently, eBay is allowing you to post your first four automobile auctions of this type for free, too. As long as you pass on all the extra upgrades and add-ons, you can create a national listing at any starting price for free. With this format, you can eliminate a lot of the grunt work that accompanies a classified listing. (Grunt work includes answering phone calls, negotiating, showing the car, etc )

    So, I could simply list my car with a starting price equal to what I d normally offer in my classified ads. It s unlikely that I d get any bids, but as a free 7-day listing, it s hard to pass up taking a shot. I ll already be compiling the info for my classified ads, so it d only take an extra 15 minutes or so to upload the data into a standard auction of this type.

    Is the extra 15 minutes worth taking an unlikely shot at selling my car outside of my local market? I m not sure. eBay will automatically compile and offer shipping options to someone who may want to have the car transported. These ranged from $300-$700 on some of the sample cars I looked through. Would someone actually pay that? Again, I m not sure.

    Edmunds.com featured an article about a couple that sold cars online to people from all around the country. people who would fly in to inspect the cars. I like to keep a fairly open mind, but I just can t imagine someone wanting to buy plane tickets to come check out a potential car from across the country. (In the story, the couple even picked them up from the airport and made breakfast!)

    Deciding what to do

    Many times when I write a post, I explore a topic I m experienced with. I look for areas where I ve had either success or failure that may be valuable if I were to share it. This isn t one of those posts.

    On this topic, I m still clueless. I d actually like to know what you think! Have any of you bought or sold vehicles using eBay (either classified or standard listing formats)? Do you know anyone who has? Am I missing any huge gaps in my thought process? If you were in my shoes, what would you do to maximize the exposure for your car online?

    I love Craigslist, but I m convinced I may be leaving money on the table if I don t seriously consider eBay for selling my car. If there s interest in this topic, I ll be sure to post a follow-up describing any successes or failures!

    GRS is committed to helping our readers save and achieve their financial goals. Savings interest rates may be low, but that is all the more reason to shop for the best rate. Find the highest savings interest rates and CD rates from Synchrony Bank. Ally Bank. GE Capital Bank. and more.



    Should I Buy a New Car or a Used Luxury Car? #classic #car #parts


    #what car should i buy
    #

    Should I Buy a New Car or a Used Luxury Car?

    1 of 3

    Luxury cars are often called “aspirational vehicles.” In other words, they are something many people strive toward purchasing one day. A new luxury car might not be attainable. But a used luxury car might be. The big question is this: Is a used luxury a smart choice?

    Consider this scenario: You’re prepared to spend $30,000 on your next car. You can easily afford a new non-luxury sedan, like a Honda Accord, loaded with such options as leather, navigation, automatic climate control and a rearview camera.

    What if, for about $2,500 less, you could get a three-year-old BMW 328i with just under 10,000 miles on it? Or if the 3 Series is too small, how about a four-year-old Mercedes-Benz E350 with 38,000 miles for about $29,900? It’s a tempting proposition. But is it a good choice?

    Keep in mind that the prices above are just examples. The actual price will depend on the specific vehicle, where it’s being sold and whether it is being sold by a dealer or a private seller.

    For the purposes of this article, we’re going to use a 2011 BMW 328i and a 2014 Honda Accord EX-L with navigation as our reference points. We’ve come up with a list of pros and cons of a new non-luxury versus used luxury car-buying decision.

    A New Non-Luxury Car

    • Perfect condition: The car will only have a few miles on it and you are its first owner. A used car’s mileage and condition will vary.
    • Longer warranty: New cars come with at least a three-year limited warranty and at least a five-year warranty for the powertrain. Some luxury cars have longer warranties, but there may only be a year or two left on them, depending on the age of the car you’re interested in buying. Buying a Certified Pre-Owned (CPO) vehicle can offset this to some degree, but you’ll have to pay more for the car.
    • Better selection: You can go to any franchise dealership and find the new car you want. Used cars are sold everywhere, but they will have a greater degree of variation because of their mileage and condition level.
    • Better incentives: The new vehicle may have incentives that can drop the price or offer a low interest rate. Interest rates are typically higher on used vehicles.
    • Newer technology: The newer the car, the more modern features it will have. This can apply to safety (more airbags, better crumple zones) and infotainment technology (streaming audio, better smartphone integration).
    • Less maintenance: A new car should only need oil changes and tire rotations. Some new cars actually come with free maintenance. If something breaks down, it will be covered under the new-car warranty. The used luxury car might have free maintenance, too, but it may only have a year or two remaining on its coverage.
    • Higher depreciation: A new car will see its highest depreciation in its first few years. The first year alone is about 21 percent, according to Edmunds data.
    • “Vanilla” transportation: The car will be brand-new and it will get you where you need to go, but it won’t be a luxury vehicle. This is only an issue if one of the things you want in a car is the ability to wow your friends and family. Or perhaps you had set out to buy a luxury car, but settled on a non-luxury one. You might be feeling a little let down by having to drive a plain-vanilla vehicle.


    Should I Buy a New Car? 6 Reasons to Buy a New Car over a Used Car #auto #ratings


    #new used cars
    #

    Should I Buy a New Car? 6 Reasons to Buy a New Car over a Used Car

    By Jason Steele

    Despite big promotional events and appealing advertisements, new cars come with hefty price tags and lose their value very quickly due to depreciation. In fact, there are many benefits to buying a used car for cheap over a brand new one.

    However, there are a few specific occasions when a new car isn t just a luxury indulgence and a way to pamper yourself. It actually makes more sense to buy new in these cases.

    Benefits of Buying a New Car

    1. New Safety Technology

    In the automobile industry, the amazing power of computer processors has sparked a technology revolution, and manufacturers are finally using technology to enhance safety. When you spend on a new car, you can find advanced safety features including:

    • Stability control
    • Adaptive cruise control
    • Lane departure warning
    • Blind spot monitoring
    • Rear-view camera

    As with earlier developments like anti-lock brakes, these new features are quickly trickling down from high-end luxury cars to family sedans and even economy brands. It s too soon to find them in most used vehicles, but you can find affordable new cars with great safety features.

    2. Fuel Efficiency Breakthroughs

    Federal regulations have average fuel efficiency set to rocket from 27.5 MPG in 2010 to 39 MPG by 2016. While small fuel efficient cars have been on the market for a few years, the mileage ratings of other vehicles usually the more budget-friendly cars have languished until now. In the next few years you ll see minivans, pickup trucks, luxury cars, and even sports cars posting efficiency numbers that were once only found in hybrids and small economy cars.

    If you put a lot of mileage on your car, you can balance upfront cost of a new car with the long-term savings of a more efficient engine (especially with gas prices rising ).

    3. Alternative Energy Advances

    Though the ethanol boom has faded, other alternative energy trends are here to stay. Pure electric vehicles like the new Nissan Leaf and the Ford Focus Electric promise to dramatically cut energy costs per mile driven. Their equivalent fuel economy ratings are in the triple digits. making a Toyota Prius look like a gas guzzler. Not to be outdone, GM is now selling the Chevrolet Volt, their plug-in hybrid that will run on either gas or electricity. A plug-in Prius and the Ford C-Max Energi should also hit the market next year.

    Don t forget that electric cars aren t the only alternative-fuel vehicles. Diesel-engine cars, long popular in Europe, are making a big comeback in North America. They offer very high mileage, especially on the highway. Honda even sells a methane-powered version of the Civic, which is in high demand in parts of the country where natural gas is cheap.

    You could save thousands of dollars in energy expenses in just a few years with one of these new vehicles. Electric cars won t be available in the used car market until a few years from now, and they re going to be in very high-demand, which means their prices will be higher than most used cars.

    4. Cars for the Long Haul

    Used cars make sense if you plan to keep a car for a few years and then sell or trade it in for another used car. But if you plan to keep up with maintenance and watch the odometer roll way past 100,000 miles, you may not want the uncertain history that comes with a used car. Rather than worry about a previous owner who skipped oil changes or abused an older car, with a new car you know that you re responsible for gentle driving and regular maintenance. Owning a car for a decade or more will mitigate the initially high taxes and depreciation enough that they will average out to be close to the costs of a used car.

    5. Government Incentives

    Cash for Clunkers came and went, and traditional hybrids no longer earn green energy tax credits. But you can still find plenty of government incentives that cut the price of new electric vehicles, plug-in hybrids, and alternative-fuel vehicles. The natural gas–powered Honda Civic GX, for example, comes with a $4,000 tax credit. If you buy a plug-in hybrid or pure electric car, you ll be entitled to a whopping $7,500 tax credit.

    Remember, this is not just a tax deduction, it s a tax credit. the equivalent of cash back. Learn more about the differences between a tax credit vs. a tax deduction .

    6. Simpler Needs, Simpler Costs

    You might be drawn to a new car by a low advertised price, only to learn from the car dealership that the base price is for a low- or no-frills model. To get the advanced features like cruise control, voice recognition, a navigation system, and seat warmers, you ll deal with a list of expensive options, often adding as much as $10,000 to your total before taxes.

    If you know that you don t want pricey options like pearlescent paint coating, larger wheels, or even an automatic transmission, you ll probably find less of a difference between the prices of new cars and used cars. If you re just trying to get to the office or train station and back, you can custom order a new car from the dealer without all of the unnecessary options and get a competitive price for a brand new car.

    Final Word

    Anyone who tells you that the new car vs. used car debate has an absolute winner hasn t really considered every circumstance.

    In most situations, a used car is the lower-cost, higher-value option. But with recent advances in technology and government incentives, new cars have enough significant benefits that they re often worth the extra expense. It s up to you as a smart consumer to weigh your needs against the costs and benefits of both new and used cars. Don t be surprised if you occasionally find that the new car represents better value.

    Was your most recent car purchase a new or used vehicle? How did you finally make the decision?



    Should You Trade In Your Car or Sell It Yourself? US News #car #rentals


    #trade in your car
    #

    How to drive up the price with tune-ups and effective promotion.

    For many car owners looking to sell their vehicle, a dealership is their first and last stop. But experts say those who are determined, patient and willing to take initiative can get a better offer by bypassing the dealership and selling their own automobile.

    While selling a used car on your own can prove profitable, it can also be challenging. Here are tips from the pros on how to determine your car’s retail value, highlight its best features and lock in a prospective buyer:

    Pinpoint your asking price. Start with a website like KelleyBlueBook.com to get a rough estimate of how much your car is worth. Plug in as many details as possible, such as a built-in navigation system, CD player, premium sound and leather upholstery, since they may increase the value of your vehicle. The website will then estimate your car’s private party value (a price KBB projects you can get in a sale from consumer to consumer). David Weliver, a former car salesman and publisher of the Money Under 30 blog, says although KBB puts a specific dollar value on a car’s worth, it’s best to use the calculation to figure out a range for the vehicle’s retail value rather than making it your asking price.

    To narrow down the range, compare your car to other vehicles of the same year and model with similar mileage. Check out websites such as AutoTrader.com, Craigslist.org and eBay.com/motors, which host thousands of advertisements for used cars from private parties. It can also help to get quotes from several local dealerships.

    Adam Goldfein, host of the TV show AutoScoop on CW69 in Atlanta, says sellers should generally stay within 5 percent of what they think is a fair asking price. Setting the price too high can make buyers automatically disregard your advertisement, while pricing the car too low can raise a red flag. If everyone is selling your Honda model for $20,000 and you’re asking for $16,000, I’d be skeptical, Goldfein says.

    Take the time for a tune-up. Simply giving the car a wash and hanging a new air freshener won’t cut it. Fixing low-maintenance items like worn brake pads, weathered tires and rusted rotors requires little time and shows buyers you take good care of the car. People want ready-to-drive cars, Weliver says, not something they have to take to the shop.

    Joe Wiesenfelder, executive editor of cars.com, recommends removing all personal items, including political bumper stickers. Do you want to sell to someone who has the same political views as you, or do you just want to sell the car? Wiesenfelder says. Some decals can be hard to remove without damaging the paint, so it may be worth paying for a professional detailing, which starts around $100 and includes cleaning, waxing and polishing of both the interior and exterior.

    It’s also crucial to take your vehicle to a mechanic to make sure there are no major problems. Many consumers will want to have the car inspected anyway, so taking the initiative can save time and establish trust with the buyer. Present the buyer a copy of the mechanic’s summary and, if possible, your vehicle’s history report.

    If you choose to commission repairs, pay close attention to the driver-side door, window and handle, as people see those parts before they take a test drive, says Phil Reed, senior consumer advice editor at Edmunds.com. While at the shop, you can ask your mechanic for recommendations on buyers; he or she may know if any customers are in the market for a used car. Some mechanics may even decide to buy the car from you, Wiesenfelder says, since they can fix it and then try to flip it for a profit.

    Promote effectively. Consider advertising on AutoTrader, CraigsList and eBayMotors (the sites useful for preliminary research). Goldfein offers these recommendations on how to take high-quality photographs for your listing:

    • Make sure nothing in the background matches the color of your car.



    Should You Try Pay-As-You-Drive Insurance? US News #replacement #car #keys


    #pay as you go car insurance
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    There are good arguments for – and against – usage-based insurance.

    For several years now, car insurance companies have bombarded the nation with television commercials, beseeching consumers to sign up for what is commonly called pay-as-you-drive insurance, although some in the industry prefer the term usage-based insurance. You’ll also hear this type of insurance referred to as telematics, which describes the combined use of technology and information.

    The idea behind pay-as-you-drive insurance is that if you are as good of a driver as you tell your family and friends, you shouldn’t mind attaching a device to your car – usually to your auto’s onboard diagnostics port – that collects information about how you drive, such as how you hard you brake and whether you tend to have something of a lead foot.

    Should you sign up? After all, while these devices were once something of a curiosity, they’re becoming more mainstream. Last year, a LexisNexis Risk Solutions survey of 2,072 U.S. residents found that 1 in 3 consumers are aware of usage-based insurance. And telematicsupdate.com, an industry website, estimates that about a million cars in the United States were using telematics devices at the end of 2012. It projected that by the end of 2013, there would be five million cars using these devices.

    For those who have considered installing the gadgetry but have questions, here are some answers.

    Who offers pay-as-you-drive insurance? Some of the big players include Progressive, Allstate, State Farm, Travelers, Esurance, the Hartford, Safeco and GMAC. That said, even if a company offers this insurance, it may not offer it in your state. Each state regulates its own insurance (there is no national standard), and each insurer is navigating each state’s red tape allowing pay-as-you-drive or usage-based insurance to be offered to consumers.

    How much do drivers save when they use these devices? Typically, insurers promise consumers that they’ll save anywhere from 20 to 50 percent; just how much depends on your insurer. Some insurers offer an immediate discount, usually 5 or 10 percent, for simply installing the device.

    Can a driver lose money by using the device? If a driver can lose money, the insurers don’t mention it in their marketing, and some company spokespeople will flatly say the consumer will not be charged more money, or lose their policy, by using these devices. For instance, Sarah Inciong, the director of the Drivewise program, the usage-based insurance plan for Allstate, says: The way our program is designed, it’s only to reward people for good driving. The worst that will happen is that someone won’t save much – or anything.

    Tony Hare, product managing director for Travelers, says the same thing – that no discount is the worst-case scenario.

    What exactly do these devices measure? It depends on the company, but most measure a car’s speed, the time of day or night that driving is done and the mileage. Some, like Travelers’ IntelliDrive, have a GPS component, in which you can track where you’ve been driving. Some critics have suggested that there’s an ominous Big Brother aspect to this type of tracking, which is why most insurers aren’t utilizing GPS. But proponents see the data, including the GPS information, as a Big Parent approach, one that their customer-parents will welcome. For instance, Travelers’ IntelliDrive program can send speeding alerts to the consumer – which can be helpful to know if your kid is out driving the car.

    Many customers use the alerts to help coach their teenage drivers, Hare says.

    Inciong echoes the same sentiment. A parent can log into the website and show their child, ‘Here are patterns of risky behavior,’ or maybe your teen is a really good driver, and you can show them, ‘You’re doing really well,’ Inciong says.

    There is a limit to how much information these programs track. For instance, Inciong says, at least with Allstate’s Drivewise program, if you’re driving 10 miles faster than you should be in a 45-mile-per-hour zone, your device won’t know that.



    6 Things Every Sucker Should Know Before Buying a Used Car #buy #new #car


    #buy a used car
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    6 Things Every Sucker Should Know Before Buying a Used Car

    By Robert Brockway October 25, 2012 1,279,484 Views

    Buying a used car is like going to a dentist who wants to knock out your old teeth and sell you new ones. Everybody involved in the process is assuredly biased, possibly psychotic, and actively wants to do you bodily harm. More sad, dissatisfied people have left car dealerships than strip clubs, and it’s no wonder: Cars are extremely complicated, terribly expensive, and for some reason every one is guarded by a small gang of pathological liars. It’s one of the worst experiences of your life, and you need somebody trustworthy to help you. Unfortunately, you’ve got me. Lucky for you, I have bought and destroyed more cars than is technically allowable by the United States government, and am therefore legally obligated to actually try to help you in this column, which I do as a “service” to the “community.” I think we can get through this, if you take my advice to heart.*

    *Well, except for all the times I tell you to “flip the table on them bitches.” That’s just some good general advice I try to work in everywhere, and may not be applicable to the situation at hand.

    #6. Do Your Research

    Never, ever walk into a dealership “just to see what they’ve got.” Salesmen see that aimless stare on your face and they’re like starving cartoon wolves — they don’t even see a person; all they see is a giant walking turkey leg. Most small and midsize dealerships will have online inventories. Check those out in advance and start looking up the models you’re interested in, then read up on each one: Comb through car sites like Edmunds, click on forum posts by owners, get the specs and find out about users’ experience with reliability — hell, go to Wikipedia and bone up on the entire history of the model and the powertrain you’re considering. Back in school, you’d do the same amount of research for a book report on Huck Finn just because an older lady in a paneled skirt threatened you with the alphabet — you can do the same legwork for a multi-thousand-dollar purchase you’re going to entrust your life to every time you leave the house to get a burrito. Whatever you do, the point is to come in with a mental list: Do not let them steer you outside of that list to a car that you’re not familiar with. Adventure is wondrous and grand, but the used car lot is not the place to listen to strange old men in tattered clothes whisper of magical chariots.

    “It’s dangerous to go alone. Take this Daihatsu!”

    Now this is the important part, so pay attention: No matter what anybody tells you — no matter how respectable the source — never, ever, ever buy the Kia. Regardless of dealership affiliation, every used car lot on the planet has a dull red Kia out back that they want to show you. It’s going to feel wrong, somehow, like the air around it has gone stale. That’s the universe trying to warn you. There will be rational arguments, and your brain is gonna be all like, “Hey, it sounds like they’ve gotten a lot better lately,” and, “Look, even the car magazines think they’ve got some decent models.” But there’s a very simple explanation for this illusion: It’s a vast government conspiracy and everybody is in on it but me. They are terrible cars that will explode and betray you, no matter how meticulously you care for them. Isn’t that right, Optima, you fickle bitch?! You broke my heart! And for what? A measly 15,000 miles? I thought we had something! I spent two years inside of you. Does that mean nothing?!

    #5. Dealing With the Dealer

    You need to treat the first few moments at a dealership like an old-timey mobster being interrogated by the coppers: You don’t say nothin’ about nothin’. Financing? What’s that? Trade-ins? Ha, what a hilarious portmanteau of gibberish! Price range? I don’t even speak English.

    The first step is just and only to find the car you want, go over it carefully, take stock of any work that needs doing, and barter out the final price. Only when that’s all settled do you talk about trading in something. Why would you discuss trade-ins right up front if you haven’t even found a car you like? You’re not even sure you’re shopping there yet. The grocery store doesn’t pull you aside when you walk in the doors and ask how much you’re planning to spend today. So why do dealerships always want to know your price, payment and trades first? Because it gives them leverage against you: “Oh, well, if we’re going to do you a favor and take this trade-in off your hands, you have to buy one of these pre-selected vehicles.” Or, “Oh, you’re financing? Those aren’t our finance cars. Our finance cars are all dull red Kias; let’s go out back and take a look.”

    “Ignore the disembodied voices telling you to flee. That’s a. feature. Ghost-voicing. Costs extra.”

    That’s bullshit. Everything is a finance car. Just like everything is a cash car. The car does not care how you pay for it. It is a car. Even if it becomes sentient, it’s mostly only going to care about fighting crime and ramping shit, like K.I.T.T. from Knight Rider. And brother, if that happens: You let it. You buy yourself a leather jacket and a perm and get the fuck out of there; your car search is over.

    #4. Vehicle Inspection

    There are a few basic things you can check, even if you know nothing about cars. First thing you want to do is get right up close against the side of the front fender. (This should also serve to draw out any potential sentient-car crime-fighting partners, as they cannot resist wisecracking and will likely say something cute like, “Geez, buy me dinner first.” If so, then you’re done: It’s all cowhide coverings and curly hair for the rest of your days.) If there’s little to no rapport between you and the vehicle at this point, just sight down the trim lines to make sure they’re straight with no fluctuations — offset doors, fenders, and uneven lines could indicate frame damage. Look around the engine bay at the spots where the metal struts come together — the joints should be straight, with no signs of recent welding. Take a look underneath the car and watch for rust on the rails, in the wheel wells, or basically anywhere else. Be afraid of rust. Rust is the mind-killer. You’ll think you can take rust — it’s just some pansy little oxidation, right? But you can’t. Rust is better than you. Rust will laugh at your feeble angle grinders; it will spit at your steel wool and mock your puny acids. Rust will shrug off all your mightiest efforts and then, when you are broken, it will take your woman in a way that you never could.

    “F. from behind? I don’t know, man; I’m just a chemical process.”

    Also remember to CHECK. THE. FUCKING. FLUIDS. Don’t just stare at the engine with your dick in your hand, wondering if you could stop the flywheel with your cock (no matter how awesome it would be to seize a V8 with nothing but your willpower and steely erection, this is not the time for it). Pull those dipsticks out and check the reservoirs. Brake fluid is, in an ideal world, clear to slightly yellowish. But the world we live in is broken and flawed, so it’s usually tea-colored. If it looks like strong coffee, you’re going to need to bleed the brake system, at the very least. That’s a few hundred dollars right there. It doesn’t require a lot of know-how or expensive parts, so you’re going to want to do it yourself.

    Do not.

    Bleeding brakes is exactly as traumatic as bleeding your only child, only it takes like, four times as long (depending on size and age of child). Check the oil: If it looks like a Wendy’s chocolate Frosty, just turn around and run. Run as fast as you can. Hop into your car and tear ass out of that dealership like The Dukes of Hazzard. That means a blown head-gasket, and it is death. If somebody assures you, “It’ll still run,” you can respond, “So will a man with no legs, if you shoot at him enough; that doesn’t mean he’ll get far.” (The casual murder references let ’em know you mean business.)

    “Hi, Bob. Nice to meet you. I’ve killed four men. Every one of them stole from me.”

    Make sure the coolant is clear, the transmission fluid is red or purplish (just not black or oily) and all the belts and hoses are free of cracks. Finally, if it’s a new car or a big expense, you buy yourself a copy of a program like Torque, then go on eBay and get an ODBII scanner. Plug that into the car (the ODB slot is usually beneath the dash on the driver’s side) and you can see literally everything about its engine in real time, right there on your smartphone. Do me a favor and look at the salesman’s face when you do it: See that expression? That’s what hope looks like, as it leaves the world. He’s just realized he’s not going to win this one, because you’re from the future — you’ve already done this deal.



    What car should I buy: askcarsales #used #cars #and #trucks


    #what car should i buy
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    Rules – Laws of this Subreddit!

    If your question is regarding a trade in, Please post the Model, Year, Miles and Trim of the vehicle to help us resolve your issue faster! This includes also stating what engine your vehicle has, and a few valuable options if your vehicle has any EX. Leather, Moonroof, Tow Package, Premium Sound, Alloy Wheels.

    Please let us know if you are financing or paying cash in regards to a lot purchase, so we can respond with the appropraite information for your situation. As well as what country/state you live in.

    If you have suggestions/thoughts/comments or anything you need to discuss with us then please press the message the mods button below, we will reply as promptly as possible.

    If Posting any type of links, Please format them. Only car salespeople are allowed to submit links such as videos or blog posts. All other links are only allowed in the body of a question.

    If you are a car salesperson – we encourage you to submit proof to mods to get flair, so that anyone will see if an answer comes from a salesperson, or a regular Redditor. To submit this request, message the moderators.



    Should you buy a used car? #rent #a #car


    #buy used car
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    Should you buy a used car?

    By Aaron Gold. Cars Expert

    Aaron Gold, About.com s Cars Expert, has been an automotive journalist for a decade and a half and has been writing for About.com since 2004. He contributes to several automotive publications and is a member of the North American Car and Truck of the Year jury.

    Continue Reading Below

    The same car for less money

    When you buy used, you miss out on the heaviest depreciation hit. A new entry-level Honda Accord will set you back around $25,000. Buy a similarly-equipped two-year-old Accord with 24,000 miles and you ll pay about $6,000 less. (And that s for a car that holds its value well. A Chevrolet Malibu costs about the same as an Accord; 2 years and 24,000 miles later it s $10,000 cheaper.)

    More car for the same money

    A new mid-level Toyota Corolla  will set you back around $21,000.

    But what if you want something bigger? For the same amount of money, you could buy a two-year-old top-of-the-line Toyota Camry  with a leather interior. Planning on growing your family? You ll find plenty of four-year-old HSUVs and minivans in the new Corolla s price range.

    You can also move up in prestige. A new Toyota Camry XLE V6 with all the bells and whistles is a nice ride; at $35,000 it had better be. But for the same price (or even a couple grand less), you could be stylin in a two-year-old Lexus ES. Audi A6 or BMW 3-series .

    Continue Reading Below

    Certified pre-owned (CPO): Used cars with new benefits

    More and more manufacturers offer certified pre-owned programs. Cars sold as certified pre-owned (CPO) bridge the gap between new and used. They are subject to a rigorous inspection and repair process, and usually are covered by a warranty from the manufacturer. CPO cars will usually cost more than non-CPO cars, but the added warranty and peace of mind makes them a good value.

    Why not buy used?

    Are there disadvantages to buying used? Definitely. New cars are covered by a comprehensive zero-deductable warranty; if your used car breaks, you will have to pay for repairs (or a deductible if you buy an extended warranty ). Also, a used car will need wear items, such as tires and brakes, replaced sooner than a new car, items that are usually not covered under warranty. And most cars require rather expensive servicing around the 50,000 and 100,000 mile marks; a used car will be closer to those intervals. (See my tips for keeping your car running forever .) If you re looking at lowering your overall costs, rather than just your purchase costs, you may be better off with an inexpensive new car .

    Financing is generally more expensive for used cars (though this may be offset by cheaper insurance rates), and if you prefer to lease. a used car probably isn t a viable option. By buying a used car, you may be missing out on some of the latest-and-greatest safety and technical gadgets. And, of course, there s that new car smell. Let s face it: Having a new car is a great feeling.

    In the end, all of these things have a price, often several thousand dollars. Is it worth it? That s up to you — but if you re looking to stretch your car-buying dollar as far as possible, buying used is a sensible option.



    Should I Sell My Car to Get Out of Debt – Pay Off Bills? #national #car #hire


    #sell car
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    Should I Sell My Car to Get Out of Debt Pay Off Bills?

    By David Quilty

    How strong is your desire to get out of debt? What are you willing to give up, sell, or live without in order to meet that dream head on? Would you be inclined to sell your beloved car in order to bring your balance sheet back into the black? In many cases, selling your car and going without one, or replacing it with something cheaper, can be a great way to finally pay off your debt.

    To help you make this decision, evaluate how much your car is really costing you. To do this, you must think beyond your monthly payment. Sure, your payment may only be $280 a month, but that doesn t include any associated costs like rising gas prices. car insurance. scheduled (and unscheduled) auto maintenance, and any parking permits or parking fees you have to pay for work or home. Depending on where you live and what you drive, this could add up to a small fortune every month.

    Is that amount inhibiting you from paying off your debt? If so, consider selling your car. Or maybe trading in that money-pit would be the way to go for your finances. Whether or not this move makes sense will depend on your car, your habits, and your locale.

    Questions to Ask Before Selling Your Car

    1. How Much Do You Spend on Gas, Insurance, and Maintenance?

    All cars carry at least these three expenses. Some cars are gas guzzlers, while others prefer to sip (e.g. hybrid cars ), which means big savings for you at the pump. Insurance can also be significantly more expensive for, say, a red sports car compared to a Volvo station-wagon.

    Maintenance is another expense that for some cars can be significantly higher than for others. For example, does your car need specialty dealer-made parts, or are off-brands available? Can you perform DIY car maintenance tips on your own? An analysis of these factors can help you determine how much your car is really costing you, and if it s worth giving up.

    2. Do You Still Owe Money on Your Car?

    If you are only one year into a five-year payment plan, chances are that you owe way more on your vehicle than a buyer would be willing to pay for it (i.e. upside down car loan ). The minute you drive your new car off the dealer s lot, you lose thousands of dollars in value.

    Find out how much your car is currently worth on a site like Kelley Blue Book or Edmunds. If you sold the car, could you pay off the balance directly out of the sales price? Or would you have to dig into your emergency savings to cover the remainder?

    Or is the balance owed completely above and beyond your ability to pay? If you can t cover the remaining balance without borrowing more money, keep the car and continue to make payments. That said, keep tabs on the value of your car versus the balance on your loan. Once you can come close to breaking even, consider selling the car again.

    3. Do You Own Your Car Outright?

    When you own your car outright (i.e. you have the title in hand), you can sell it for whatever the market will bear. If it s worth $5,000 and you sell it for that, will that make a serious dent in your debt? You need to weigh the reward you get from paying down or paying off your debt against what you give up by selling your car.

    If you have an extra car that sits unused most of the time, or if you can carpool with your spouse, it might be well worth it. On the other hand, if you give up your only mode of transportation to work, it s probably a bad idea to sell your car.

    4. Do You Even Need a Car?

    Most New Yorkers can live without a car due to the high quality public transportation system, the walkable commutes, the bike lanes to ride your bike to work. and the constant availability of taxi cabs. Los Angeles residents, on the other hand,   find it difficult to get anywhere without their own car because the city is so spread out and public transportation is only available in select areas.

    If you live and work in a city that encourages residents to be vehicle-free, why not try it out for a while? And if you still occasionally need a car, check and see if your area has any car-sharing services. These services rent cars by the hour or day and include gas, insurance, and maintenance for a very reasonable price.

    5. If You Still Need a Car, Can You Afford a Cheaper One?

    Let s say you sell your car and put the money towards your debt, but you still need a car. Can you afford a smaller, less expensive vehicle using the monthly interest you ve saved by paying down your debt? If you d have to borrow money to buy a car again, think twice before selling the one you already own. But if you can sell your car, are able to pay off some debt with the proceeds, and can still afford to pay cash for a cheaper car, then definitely consider selling.

    6. What About Lifestyle Considerations?

    You don t want to find out too late that you needed the gas-guzzling Suburban and can t get along without it. For example, do you enjoy carting your daughter s entire soccer team, plus gear, to various games and events? Or, do you otherwise need to transport large loads that a 45 mpg vehicle just can t handle? In addition to expenses, examine how you use your car and how or if you could live without it, or with something different.



    5 Things You Should Know When Renting a Car in Ireland – Irish Fireside Travel and Culture #national #rental #car


    #car insurance ireland
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    5 Things You Should Know When Renting a Car in Ireland

    The thought of driving on the left is usually the biggest concern for travelers renting a car in Ireland, but for some, the car rental policies and prices deliver a big headache especially since they tend to be different for North Americans in Ireland from other parts of Europe. Here are a few things you should know to prevent surprises along the way:

    1. Many online car rental quotes only include the cost of rental and basic insurance coverage (usually a €1,000 deductible). Taxes, fees and extra insurance may NOT be included.
    2. Most car rental companies wait until the customer arrives in Ireland before introducing their zero-deductible insurance (often called Super CDW/Super Collision Damage Waiver Insurance many companies DO include information on their websites, but it is easy to miss).
    3. Most credit cards DO NOT cover car rental insurance in Ireland. (This item is especially important for North Americans) That’s because Ireland is on the short list of countries where Mastercard and Visa do not offer this benefit. Many credit card customer service reps aren’t aware of this detail, so ask for confirmation in writing and be sure to bring the document with you when you travel (World Mastercard and Canadian Visa usually DO cover insurance).
    4. If your credit card DOES cover car insurance in Ireland, you will be required to sign extra documents to waive the rental company’s insurance. Some agencies require a deposit or a hold on your credit card when insurance is declined. These temporary fees can range from €0-15,000 (€2,000 seems be the most common).
    5. Call rental agencies before you book and ask questions especially if the costs, fees, and extra insurance are not clear to you. One call before your trip can save hours of frustration during and after your trip.

    What Are Some of the “Hidden Fees”

    Beyond the straightforward cost of your rental car, there are several fees that will likely appear on your bill some of them are lumped together and presented at the time of booking under the fees header, but others may not. Irish rental companies vary greatly on this count, so it s best to ask specifically. Here are a few fees to look for (warning, each rental company in Ireland seems to have a different name for these):

    • Environmental and Recycling Charge (usually under $5)*
    • Boarder Crossing Fee (could be around $40)*
    • Vehicle Licensing Fee (usually under $5)*

    * These fees are usually included in the standard fees category

    • Fees for drivers under the age of 25 (drivers over 70 used to be charged extra or denied, but this has changed at most rental agencies)
    • Local Taxes
    • Airport Fee/Location Service Fee
    • Collision Damage Waiver (CDW insurance) LLI (Limited Liability Insurance) CD Excess Excess Liability this fee is usually quite clear
    • Super CDW CDI Peace of Mind (POM) Insurance (please contact your rental agency directly to make sure you understand what each of their insurance offerings cover and how much they cost)
    • Personal Accident Insurance Personal Benefits
    • Theft Protection
    • Transaction Processing Fee Credit Card Admin Charge (usually a few dollars or a percent of the transaction)
    • M-50 Tolls Some rental cars are now set up to automatically bill you if you use the M-50 toll road near Dublin
    • Deposit when Declining Insurance
    • Late Fees

    Is Super CDW Insurance worth it?

    If you’re a betting type of person, the odds are in your favor if you do not purchase the extra insurance (unless of course you’re a lousy driver). However, the peace of mind of having a zero deductible can often outweigh to potential cost savings.

    My advice first-time visitors who are not used to the left should seriously consider the extra insurance I’ve seen many rental cars returned with damaged passenger side mirrors, missing hubcaps (casualties of the narrow Irish roads) and worse. Renters are charged a premium for those damages. After that first trip, you’ll be in a better position to decide if you d prefer to skip the Super CDW.

    Find More Information at:

    Note: Each rental company is different, so be sure to review the policies and information provided each Not all companies participate in the policies listed above.



    Should My Winnings Go to a New a Car? #repossessed #cars #for #sale


    #what car should i buy
    #

    Congratulations on winning your court case, but to answer your question, let me pose a few of my own because deciding whether to get a new car is a process that begins with evaluating your needs and budget. Many people don’t consider that the cost of an auto includes maintenance, payments (if you borrow money), repairs, gas, oil, tags, taxes, and insurance and that shouldn’t exceed 15 percent of your net spendable income.

    Yes, I want Breaking Christian News Submit

    So consider this:

    * Are your employed? Do you need your car for work or is public transportation or ride sharing a realistic option?

    * What is the mileage and overall condition of you present car? Do you have reason to believe that a costly problem is on the horizon? Is it possible your present car can be repaired and continue for more years with only basic maintenance?

    * Do you have an emergency savings account?

    * Do you have any debt?

    Especially when you receive a little extra money, you should evaluate some of your larger goals dealing with money. This can be the time to replace things like a bad refrigerator or for paying off expensive consumer debt.

    But before you do any of that, Crown recommends that you first give to support your church and ministries you appreciate. Following that, fully fund an emergency savings account because as your court case may show, the unexpected can happen. If you don’t have an emergency fund, begin by saving $1,000. After that, depending on your salary, build towards a minimum of one full month’s salary set aside for emergencies.

    Proverbs 21: 20 says, The wise man saves for the future, but the foolish man spends whatever he gets.” (TLB)

    Once you have accomplished these two important steps in the use of your court award, if you need your car to get to work and make a living, use the balance to purchase a quality used car that you can buy with cash. Your car is an important tool for your use that can’t be cut out of a working budget. By the way, the best investment I ever made on a used car was one I purchased for $800. I drove it for two years with almost no maintenance costs and then sold it for $800.

    Take the time to have a mechanic check over any used car that you like. At Crown we’ve found that “monthly repairs for the typical American car on the road (approximately seven years old) run about 5 percent of a family’s budget. A new car takes about 15 percent of the family’s budget. Compare 5 percent per month for maintenance on an older car to about 15 percent to buy a new car no contest.”

    Even though you may think that better gas mileage justifies the cost of a new car, some new cars would have to be driven for more than 7 years to reap the savings from lower gas usage. As a practical matter, a car is an expense, but a necessary one for most of us. So with all of that in mind, I hope you can make a wise choice. Let me know if you need more input and thanks for asking!

    Ask Chuck is a weekly column featuring answers to your financial questions. Click here to ask Chuck a question and his response could be featured here.



    Should You Trade In Your Car or Sell It Yourself? US News #nada #used #car #values


    #trade in your car
    #

    How to drive up the price with tune-ups and effective promotion.

    For many car owners looking to sell their vehicle, a dealership is their first and last stop. But experts say those who are determined, patient and willing to take initiative can get a better offer by bypassing the dealership and selling their own automobile.

    While selling a used car on your own can prove profitable, it can also be challenging. Here are tips from the pros on how to determine your car’s retail value, highlight its best features and lock in a prospective buyer:

    Pinpoint your asking price. Start with a website like KelleyBlueBook.com to get a rough estimate of how much your car is worth. Plug in as many details as possible, such as a built-in navigation system, CD player, premium sound and leather upholstery, since they may increase the value of your vehicle. The website will then estimate your car’s private party value (a price KBB projects you can get in a sale from consumer to consumer). David Weliver, a former car salesman and publisher of the Money Under 30 blog, says although KBB puts a specific dollar value on a car’s worth, it’s best to use the calculation to figure out a range for the vehicle’s retail value rather than making it your asking price.

    To narrow down the range, compare your car to other vehicles of the same year and model with similar mileage. Check out websites such as AutoTrader.com, Craigslist.org and eBay.com/motors, which host thousands of advertisements for used cars from private parties. It can also help to get quotes from several local dealerships.

    Adam Goldfein, host of the TV show AutoScoop on CW69 in Atlanta, says sellers should generally stay within 5 percent of what they think is a fair asking price. Setting the price too high can make buyers automatically disregard your advertisement, while pricing the car too low can raise a red flag. If everyone is selling your Honda model for $20,000 and you’re asking for $16,000, I’d be skeptical, Goldfein says.

    Take the time for a tune-up. Simply giving the car a wash and hanging a new air freshener won’t cut it. Fixing low-maintenance items like worn brake pads, weathered tires and rusted rotors requires little time and shows buyers you take good care of the car. People want ready-to-drive cars, Weliver says, not something they have to take to the shop.

    Joe Wiesenfelder, executive editor of cars.com, recommends removing all personal items, including political bumper stickers. Do you want to sell to someone who has the same political views as you, or do you just want to sell the car? Wiesenfelder says. Some decals can be hard to remove without damaging the paint, so it may be worth paying for a professional detailing, which starts around $100 and includes cleaning, waxing and polishing of both the interior and exterior.

    It’s also crucial to take your vehicle to a mechanic to make sure there are no major problems. Many consumers will want to have the car inspected anyway, so taking the initiative can save time and establish trust with the buyer. Present the buyer a copy of the mechanic’s summary and, if possible, your vehicle’s history report.

    If you choose to commission repairs, pay close attention to the driver-side door, window and handle, as people see those parts before they take a test drive, says Phil Reed, senior consumer advice editor at Edmunds.com. While at the shop, you can ask your mechanic for recommendations on buyers; he or she may know if any customers are in the market for a used car. Some mechanics may even decide to buy the car from you, Wiesenfelder says, since they can fix it and then try to flip it for a profit.

    Promote effectively. Consider advertising on AutoTrader, CraigsList and eBayMotors (the sites useful for preliminary research). Goldfein offers these recommendations on how to take high-quality photographs for your listing:

    • Make sure nothing in the background matches the color of your car.



    Why you should buy a hire car – Cars #cheap #car #insurance #for #young #drivers


    #ex lease cars for sale
    #

    Why you should buy a hire car

    They might have a terrible reputation, but ex-rental cars are some of the best on the second-hand market

    Julie Sinclair Consumer features writer, Telegraph Cars

    A s a used car buyer, your instinct probably tells you to steer clear of anything that was once a daily rental. But don’t be too hasty. There’s evidence to suggest that these are now some of the best-kept second-hand cars available.

    The reason, it seems, boils down to profit. A decade ago, the rental market was still seen as a dumping ground for cheaper, entry-level cars, which were then handled roughly by inconsiderate drivers. Now, though, manufacturers have realised the potential for using this market as an extended test drive to showcase their latest models, gadgets and engines.

    This only works if the cars are kept showroom fresh. Fiat ’s commercial director, Karl Howkins, said: “Rental cars are typically on the road for no more than nine months.”

    That makes them “ticking time bombs” for rental companies looking to get the best return for their investment, according to the British Vehicle Rental and Leasing Association. A spokesman said: “When they come off-fleet, they face competition from pre-registered cars and nearly-new demonstrators, so companies have to make sure the vehicles are in mint condition.”

    But aren’t rental cars thrashed around by heavy-footed holidaymakers while on fleet? That’s the used car buyers’ biggest worry, but in reality there’s little evidence of extra mechanical wear and tear.

    H owkins said: “They may come back with scuffed alloy wheels or minor dings, but clutch replacement is rare.”

    Hertz general manager Neil Cunningham said that most of its breakdown and recovery call-outs are due to “lost keys and flat batteries”.

    Figures from insurer Accident Exchange seem to back up these statements. It says general bodywork repairs account for more than 60 per cent of its rental car claims.

    Fear of red tape and £1,000 policy excesses could well be to thank for people taking better care of rental cars. A spokesman for dealer group Pendragon said: “Rental cars are often in better shape than ones on lease or fleet, as the drivers know they have to pay for any damage.”

    Wear and tear is closely monitored by hire firms, too. Cunningham said: “The average Hertz vehicle has oil, water and tyre pressures checked every six days. This is certainly not the case for the average privately owned car.”

    The pressure on hire firms to keep their cars in good condition is also driven by buy-back schemes. That’s where the age, condition and mileage of cars as they come off-fleet has all been agreed in advance by the manufacturer, which has fixed a price to buy them back. Fiat says that 95 per cent of its rental stock is dealt with in this way.

    These cars end up on franchised dealer forecourts, after more quality checks, as approved used stock. They have covered more miles than the average for a car of their age – usually between 10,000 and 11,000 – but they should be cheaper as a result.

    Some ex-rental cars can be found at auction

    E x-rentals are also sold through auction houses, while some hire firms sell direct to their customers. Hertz’s Rent2Buy programme offers customers an extended test drive of up to 10 days, after which they can either pay the rental fees, or buy the car and deduct those from the price.

    Technically, ex-rentals don’t depreciate any quicker than any other comparable used car, according to car valuation expert CAP Automotive. “We don’t differentiate between an ex-rental and a privately owned car,” CAP’s retail and consumer editor, Philip Nothard, said. “Our value is based on what people are paying for cars based on age, condition and miles on the clock.”

    Of course, you may never discover that the car you’re buying is an ex-rental anyway. Despite the industry consensus that this history should no longer carry any stigma, dealers are still reluctant to come clean. Pendragon agreed it would reveal this detail only “if asked”.

    Dealers are breaking the law if they knowingly withhold the fact that your car was once a loaner if you ask, however. It’s classed as a misleading omission, because the Office of Fair Trading argues you might not have bought the car had you known.

    If you do find out that the car you’re interested in is an ex-rental, though, it certainly shouldn’t put you off. CAP said: “They’re no more risky than any other approved used car.” And the Telegraph’s own used car expert, Honest John, advises: “Ex-rental cars are better run in than cars from single ownership because of the many different driving styles they have been subjected to. Forget your prejudices and don’t worry because there’s no cause to do so.”

    F or all the latest news, advice and reviews from Telegraph Cars, sign up to our weekly newsletter by entering your email here



    Should You Trade in Your Old Car? Buying Advice #car #wash #equipment


    #trade in your car
    #

    To trade or not to trade

    By Aaron Gold. Cars Expert

    Aaron Gold, About.com s Cars Expert, has been an automotive journalist for a decade and a half and has been writing for About.com since 2004. He contributes to several automotive publications and is a member of the North American Car and Truck of the Year jury.

    You re ready to buy a new car. Should you trade in your old car or sell it yourself? The answer is the old adage: You never know until you try. If you want to get top dollar for your old car, it s best to go to the dealer, see what happens, and then make your decision. Here are some guidelines that will prepare you for what will happen and help you decide what s best for you.

    Know what your car is worth

    KBB shows three values: Trade-in, private party. and retail. Check the trade-in (lowest) and private-party values for a good estimate. (KBB will walk you through determining your car s condition – be honest!) Next, peruse the local online classifieds to see how close asking prices for cars like yours are to actual book values.

    Have reasonable expectations

    Offer the trade-in last



    Should My Winnings Go to a New a Car? #vehicle #value


    #what car should i buy
    #

    Congratulations on winning your court case, but to answer your question, let me pose a few of my own because deciding whether to get a new car is a process that begins with evaluating your needs and budget. Many people don’t consider that the cost of an auto includes maintenance, payments (if you borrow money), repairs, gas, oil, tags, taxes, and insurance and that shouldn’t exceed 15 percent of your net spendable income.

    Yes, I want Breaking Christian News Submit

    So consider this:

    * Are your employed? Do you need your car for work or is public transportation or ride sharing a realistic option?

    * What is the mileage and overall condition of you present car? Do you have reason to believe that a costly problem is on the horizon? Is it possible your present car can be repaired and continue for more years with only basic maintenance?

    * Do you have an emergency savings account?

    * Do you have any debt?

    Especially when you receive a little extra money, you should evaluate some of your larger goals dealing with money. This can be the time to replace things like a bad refrigerator or for paying off expensive consumer debt.

    But before you do any of that, Crown recommends that you first give to support your church and ministries you appreciate. Following that, fully fund an emergency savings account because as your court case may show, the unexpected can happen. If you don’t have an emergency fund, begin by saving $1,000. After that, depending on your salary, build towards a minimum of one full month’s salary set aside for emergencies.

    Proverbs 21: 20 says, The wise man saves for the future, but the foolish man spends whatever he gets.” (TLB)

    Once you have accomplished these two important steps in the use of your court award, if you need your car to get to work and make a living, use the balance to purchase a quality used car that you can buy with cash. Your car is an important tool for your use that can’t be cut out of a working budget. By the way, the best investment I ever made on a used car was one I purchased for $800. I drove it for two years with almost no maintenance costs and then sold it for $800.

    Take the time to have a mechanic check over any used car that you like. At Crown we’ve found that “monthly repairs for the typical American car on the road (approximately seven years old) run about 5 percent of a family’s budget. A new car takes about 15 percent of the family’s budget. Compare 5 percent per month for maintenance on an older car to about 15 percent to buy a new car no contest.”

    Even though you may think that better gas mileage justifies the cost of a new car, some new cars would have to be driven for more than 7 years to reap the savings from lower gas usage. As a practical matter, a car is an expense, but a necessary one for most of us. So with all of that in mind, I hope you can make a wise choice. Let me know if you need more input and thanks for asking!

    Ask Chuck is a weekly column featuring answers to your financial questions. Click here to ask Chuck a question and his response could be featured here.



    Should You Purchase Rental Car insurance? US News #personal #car #leasing


    #car rental insurance
    #

    Should You Purchase Rental Car insurance?

    You might already be covered for your summer road trip.

    The warm summer weather might have you itching for a road trip. But before you hit the road, you may need to spring for a rental car. And before you do that, you’ll need to decide whether to purchase rental car insurance.

    It’s a tricky decision, given the fact that you may already be covered through your existing car insurance or your credit card. Your personal auto car coverage usually does cover rental car coverage, says Merle Scheiber of the National Association of Insurance Commissioners.

    Through your personal auto car coverage, you’ll want to make sure you have collision coverage, which pays for damages to your vehicle from accidents involving other cars or objects. For people who already have collision coverage on the rental car, getting the rental car insurance policy is a waste of money, says Neil Abrams, an auto rental consultant of Abrams Consulting Group based in Purchase, N.Y. If you don’t have collision coverage, you’ll either have to pay for the rental car insurance or use a credit card to pay for the rental car—one that has rental car insurance built in.

    A number of major credit card providers offer rental auto insurance to cardholders, such as Visa, but certain cards only offer it to elite members, so check with your credit card company first. For example, Visa’s auto rental collision-damage waiver (given to Visa credit card holders) provides reimbursement for damage due to collision or theft up to the actual cash value of most rental vehicles. However, Visa’s coverage kicks in only on theft or damage expenses that are not covered by other insurance or reimbursement. In essence, the credit card acts as a secondary insurer, and it would still be wise to have your own personal auto insurance.

    The benefits of buying insurance from the rental company? It protects you from significant out-of-pocket expenses associated with loss or damage to the vehicle, including theft, says Abrams. Rental car insurance can cost roughly $20 to $40, depending on what plan you select. The collision damage waiver, also known as optional vehicle protection or loss damage waiver, can cost as much as $19 per day and shifts liability for collision damage from the person renting the car to the car rental company. Liability insurance, which provides protection for up to $1 million, costs between $7 and $14 a day. However, your personal auto insurance should already include liability insurance. For an additional $1 to $5 a day, personal accident insurance covers medical and ambulance bills for the driver and passengers in the event of an accident.

    The rental companies are required to provide statutory minimum liability coverage, Abrams says. But in a significant event, that’s not going to do much for you. Statutory minimum liability coverage provides some protection to individuals involved in an accident while driving a rental vehicle—the same minimum coverage that would apply to personal coverage.

    It’s not insurance, in the technical sense, that rental companies offer, Abrams says. Rental companies are not licensed insurance agents in every state. Instead, they offer a protection package. It doesn’t help where clear negligence is involved, Abrams warns. If you leave your car with the engine running and the key in the ignition, and the car disappears, the rental company may have a problem with that.

    Abrams adds that some people are protected through their homeowner’s policy. Home owners can extend the liability when the policyholder is not in their home, i.e. while renting a car. However, the provisions vary from one policy to another, so be sure to check ahead of time.

    Jan Zobel, a tax preparer in Oakland, Calif. rents a car when she travels to Hawaii several times a year. Zobel receives coverage using her American Express card, which charges her $17.95 per rental. I’m not a big AmEx card user, but you can bet that I pay for every rental now with that card, she says.



    Should You Try Pay-As-You-Drive Insurance? US News #toy #cars


    #pay as you go car insurance
    #

    There are good arguments for – and against – usage-based insurance.

    For several years now, car insurance companies have bombarded the nation with television commercials, beseeching consumers to sign up for what is commonly called pay-as-you-drive insurance, although some in the industry prefer the term usage-based insurance. You’ll also hear this type of insurance referred to as telematics, which describes the combined use of technology and information.

    The idea behind pay-as-you-drive insurance is that if you are as good of a driver as you tell your family and friends, you shouldn’t mind attaching a device to your car – usually to your auto’s onboard diagnostics port – that collects information about how you drive, such as how you hard you brake and whether you tend to have something of a lead foot.

    Should you sign up? After all, while these devices were once something of a curiosity, they’re becoming more mainstream. Last year, a LexisNexis Risk Solutions survey of 2,072 U.S. residents found that 1 in 3 consumers are aware of usage-based insurance. And telematicsupdate.com, an industry website, estimates that about a million cars in the United States were using telematics devices at the end of 2012. It projected that by the end of 2013, there would be five million cars using these devices.

    For those who have considered installing the gadgetry but have questions, here are some answers.

    Who offers pay-as-you-drive insurance? Some of the big players include Progressive, Allstate, State Farm, Travelers, Esurance, the Hartford, Safeco and GMAC. That said, even if a company offers this insurance, it may not offer it in your state. Each state regulates its own insurance (there is no national standard), and each insurer is navigating each state’s red tape allowing pay-as-you-drive or usage-based insurance to be offered to consumers.

    How much do drivers save when they use these devices? Typically, insurers promise consumers that they’ll save anywhere from 20 to 50 percent; just how much depends on your insurer. Some insurers offer an immediate discount, usually 5 or 10 percent, for simply installing the device.

    Can a driver lose money by using the device? If a driver can lose money, the insurers don’t mention it in their marketing, and some company spokespeople will flatly say the consumer will not be charged more money, or lose their policy, by using these devices. For instance, Sarah Inciong, the director of the Drivewise program, the usage-based insurance plan for Allstate, says: The way our program is designed, it’s only to reward people for good driving. The worst that will happen is that someone won’t save much – or anything.

    Tony Hare, product managing director for Travelers, says the same thing – that no discount is the worst-case scenario.

    What exactly do these devices measure? It depends on the company, but most measure a car’s speed, the time of day or night that driving is done and the mileage. Some, like Travelers’ IntelliDrive, have a GPS component, in which you can track where you’ve been driving. Some critics have suggested that there’s an ominous Big Brother aspect to this type of tracking, which is why most insurers aren’t utilizing GPS. But proponents see the data, including the GPS information, as a Big Parent approach, one that their customer-parents will welcome. For instance, Travelers’ IntelliDrive program can send speeding alerts to the consumer – which can be helpful to know if your kid is out driving the car.

    Many customers use the alerts to help coach their teenage drivers, Hare says.

    Inciong echoes the same sentiment. A parent can log into the website and show their child, ‘Here are patterns of risky behavior,’ or maybe your teen is a really good driver, and you can show them, ‘You’re doing really well,’ Inciong says.

    There is a limit to how much information these programs track. For instance, Inciong says, at least with Allstate’s Drivewise program, if you’re driving 10 miles faster than you should be in a 45-mile-per-hour zone, your device won’t know that.



    5 Things You Should Know When Renting a Car in Ireland – Irish Fireside Travel and Culture #pay #as #you #go #car #insurance


    #car insurance ireland
    #

    5 Things You Should Know When Renting a Car in Ireland

    The thought of driving on the left is usually the biggest concern for travelers renting a car in Ireland, but for some, the car rental policies and prices deliver a big headache especially since they tend to be different for North Americans in Ireland from other parts of Europe. Here are a few things you should know to prevent surprises along the way:

    1. Many online car rental quotes only include the cost of rental and basic insurance coverage (usually a €1,000 deductible). Taxes, fees and extra insurance may NOT be included.
    2. Most car rental companies wait until the customer arrives in Ireland before introducing their zero-deductible insurance (often called Super CDW/Super Collision Damage Waiver Insurance many companies DO include information on their websites, but it is easy to miss).
    3. Most credit cards DO NOT cover car rental insurance in Ireland. (This item is especially important for North Americans) That’s because Ireland is on the short list of countries where Mastercard and Visa do not offer this benefit. Many credit card customer service reps aren’t aware of this detail, so ask for confirmation in writing and be sure to bring the document with you when you travel (World Mastercard and Canadian Visa usually DO cover insurance).
    4. If your credit card DOES cover car insurance in Ireland, you will be required to sign extra documents to waive the rental company’s insurance. Some agencies require a deposit or a hold on your credit card when insurance is declined. These temporary fees can range from €0-15,000 (€2,000 seems be the most common).
    5. Call rental agencies before you book and ask questions especially if the costs, fees, and extra insurance are not clear to you. One call before your trip can save hours of frustration during and after your trip.

    What Are Some of the “Hidden Fees”

    Beyond the straightforward cost of your rental car, there are several fees that will likely appear on your bill some of them are lumped together and presented at the time of booking under the fees header, but others may not. Irish rental companies vary greatly on this count, so it s best to ask specifically. Here are a few fees to look for (warning, each rental company in Ireland seems to have a different name for these):

    • Environmental and Recycling Charge (usually under $5)*
    • Boarder Crossing Fee (could be around $40)*
    • Vehicle Licensing Fee (usually under $5)*

    * These fees are usually included in the standard fees category

    • Fees for drivers under the age of 25 (drivers over 70 used to be charged extra or denied, but this has changed at most rental agencies)
    • Local Taxes
    • Airport Fee/Location Service Fee
    • Collision Damage Waiver (CDW insurance) LLI (Limited Liability Insurance) CD Excess Excess Liability this fee is usually quite clear
    • Super CDW CDI Peace of Mind (POM) Insurance (please contact your rental agency directly to make sure you understand what each of their insurance offerings cover and how much they cost)
    • Personal Accident Insurance Personal Benefits
    • Theft Protection
    • Transaction Processing Fee Credit Card Admin Charge (usually a few dollars or a percent of the transaction)
    • M-50 Tolls Some rental cars are now set up to automatically bill you if you use the M-50 toll road near Dublin
    • Deposit when Declining Insurance
    • Late Fees

    Is Super CDW Insurance worth it?

    If you’re a betting type of person, the odds are in your favor if you do not purchase the extra insurance (unless of course you’re a lousy driver). However, the peace of mind of having a zero deductible can often outweigh to potential cost savings.

    My advice first-time visitors who are not used to the left should seriously consider the extra insurance I’ve seen many rental cars returned with damaged passenger side mirrors, missing hubcaps (casualties of the narrow Irish roads) and worse. Renters are charged a premium for those damages. After that first trip, you’ll be in a better position to decide if you d prefer to skip the Super CDW.

    Find More Information at:

    Note: Each rental company is different, so be sure to review the policies and information provided each Not all companies participate in the policies listed above.



    Should You Sell or Trade in Your Vehicle? #car #comparisons


    #trade in cars
    #

    Should You Sell or Trade in Your Vehicle?

    You need to consider the tax impact of selling your vehicle outright and buying another vehicle in a separate transaction or trading in your old vehicle for another.

    Personal-use Property vs Business-use Property

    Keep in mind, a loss incurred on the disposal of personal-use property is not deductible unless the loss was the result of a casualty or theft. However, a gain on the disposal of personal-use property is taxable.

    A loss on the disposal of business-use property, on the other hand, is deductible and a gain is taxable.

    For example, say you sold a vehicle that you used 80% for business and 20% for personal use and that you incurred a loss. You may deduct 80% of the loss against business income. The other 20% related to personal use is not deductible.

    If you sold the vehicle at a gain (which is unlikely), and used the vehicle 80% for business and 20% for personal use, 100% of the gain is taxable.

    When disposing of your old vehicle and buying a replacement, you can elect to treat the transaction as either a taxable sale or nontaxable exchange.

    Taxable Sale:

    • This is when you sell your old vehicle in one transaction, then buy another one in a separate transaction.

    Nontaxable Exchange:

    • This is when you trade-in your old vehicle for a replacement.

    Taxable Sale of a Car Used for Business

    If a loss would result if you sold your old vehicle, you’re better off just selling it outright rather than trading it in because you can deduct the loss in the year of sale and reduce your taxes.

    A loss would occur if the adjusted basis of old vehicle exceeds what you could sell it for (its fair market value).

    Nontaxable Exchange (trade-in old vehicle)

    When You Should Trade In Your Vehicle:

    • If a gain would result if you sold your old vehicle outright, you’re better off trading it in. This is because you can defer (postpone) reporting the gain by trading it in (exchanging it) for another vehicle. You don’t report the gain on a trade-in.

    A gain occurs if.

    • the fair market value of what you receive exceeds the adjusted basis of the vehicle you trade in plus any additional amount you pay for the new vehicle.

    Example:

    • You trade in your old vehicle with an adjusted basis of $3,000.
    • The fair market value (FMV) of the new vehicle is $7,500.
    • The dealer allows a $3,500 trade-in allowance for your old vehicle.
    • You pay $4,000 cash for the new vehicle (FMV of new vehicle $7,500 minus $3,500 trade-in allowance).

    Your gain is $500 .

    Figured as follows:

    • FMV of $7,500 (new vehicle) minus
    • $7,000 ($3,000 adjusted basis of your old vehicle plus
    • $4,000 cash you paid) equals
    • $500 gain.

    The depreciable basis of the new vehicle is $7,000 .

    Figured as follows:

    • Cash you paid, $4,000 plus
    • Adjusted basis of the old vehicle, $3,000.

    The $500 gain on the trade-in is deferred because it reduces the basis of the new vehicle. If you sold the new vehicle the next day for $7,500, you would recognize the $500 gain at that time ($7,500 minus your adjusted basis of $7,000).



    What Car Should I Buy? #used #car #dealers


    #what car should i buy
    #

    What Car Should I Buy?

    What Are the Best Cars to Buy?

    There are literally thousands of combinations of different automobile types, makes, models, styles, and prices, which can make it difficult to choose which to buy. However, we will help you determine the perfect car for your needs.

    What is a good first car?  Which car is the best buy? Which is more reliable?

    Which gets the best gas mileage? Should I buy a SUV or pickup? Which car is safer? Which is more economical?

    Which is cheaper to insure?

    What car should I buy as my first car?

    If you were to ask this question and you gave no other information about yourself or what you wanted, we would suggest you buy either a Honda Accord or Toyota Camry , two of the most popular and most purchased cars in America. Both cars come in either a sporty 2-door coupe version or a 4-door sedan, and with a variety of engines, luxury features, and safety options. Both also offer gas-saving hybrid versions.

    However, if you already know you don t want a Honda or Toyota, stay with me. I m not going to try to convince you that these are the only brands you should consider. I m just using them as a starting point to help you choose the right car for you.

    Why the Honda Accord   and Toyota Camry. Because these two cars have an almost ideal blending of all the following characteristics — the characteristics that most people want in a vehicle:

    Honda/Toyota Benefits

    • Excellent quality and reliability
    • Attractive styling
    • Easy handling
    • Great performance
    • Good gas mileage
    • Outstanding safety rating
    • Excellent value for the money
    • Affordably priced
    • Luxury features standard
    • Roomy and comfortable
    • Good cargo capacity
    • Inexpensive to insure
    • High resale value retention
    • Relatively low maintenance and repair cost

    However, as good as the Accord and Camry are, they are not the right vehicles for everyone.

    All of us have different likes, dislikes, needs, and financial situations. But if you have no idea what car you should buy, and are flexible as to the brand and model, and need a good starting point, these two vehicles are excellent candidates. You won t go wrong.

    First time buyers like Honda Civic

    One of the most popular cars for teenagers and other first-time buyers is the Honda Civic. It s a little smaller and more economical than the Accord, and it s easy to find used models in good condition. Insurance rates are relatively low and it s inexpensive to drive. It s also very reliable and safe.

    For those who like to customize their cars, there are thousands of after-market appearance and performance products for the Civic. Used Honda Civics are affordable and dependable.

    Other cars for first time buyers

    The Kia Rio is a good choice with a base price of just $11,395. It is ranked high in quality and safety, and is very economical to drive. Beware of used Rio s however. Have them inspected before you buy.

    The Toyota Corolla is legendary for it s dependability, great performance, quality, and lots of standard safety equipment. It s the smaller sister to the Camry. Used models are usually in excellent shape and hold their value well.

    The Mazda3 is popular with first time buyers because it looks good, is roomy, has good performance, low fuel cost, and doesn t cost as much as other cars with similar features. Used models have excellent reliability.

    Other cars, both new and used, that are popular with new teen drivers are the Ford FocusHonda Fit. Nissan Sentra. Mitsubishi Lancer. Ford Mustang. and Scion models.

    What if I have different needs?

    Using the Honda Accord and Toyota Camry as a base of comparison, what would you want to be different?  Why doesn t the Accord or Camry work for you?

    Do you need a different type of vehicle? Do you want a lower price? Do you need a smaller or larger size? More performance or speed? Larger with more passenger and cargo capacity? More luxury? Sportier appearance?

    Vehicle buying is a very personal experience. As such, it is almost impossible for us to tell you exactly which vehicle you should buy.

    There are many vehicle makes and models, and style variations, called trim levels , within each model. And then there are options that can be added.

    The result is that there are thousands of different combinations from which to choose — which is a big part of the problem of deciding.

    Recommendations as a first car

    Certain vehicle makes and models consistently rank high in owner surveys and ratings.

    Here are our suggestions of recommended vehicles both new and used in different categories, based on overall quality, reliability, safety, performance, and value for the money.

    Note that some vehicles listed below are no longer in production but still make good used-car choices.



    Should I buy a car through my business? #japanese #used #cars #for #sale


    #buy my car
    #

    Buying a car through your business rather than on a personal plan could work out much cheaper

    7:00AM GMT 16 Feb 2014

    Comments

    I’m frequently struck by how much cheaper it appears to be if you lease a car through a business rather than going down the Personal Contract Purchase (PCP) route. The reason this topic interests me is that as a small business owner I, like many people I imagine, could pay for running a new car using either method.

    Buy a car through your company on a scheme such as contract hire and you’ll pay a lower monthly headline figure than through a PCP. And over the term of a loan usually three or four years that adds up to a significant sum.

    To run a £28,675 BMW 318d Sport for four years through a personal payment scheme, a PCP could cost nearly £3,500 more than leasing the car through a company. In both instances, the driver would be putting up a deposit of £1,674 and running the car for 48 months. However, where under the personal scheme the finance would need to be repaid at a rate of £342 a month, under the business scheme the repayments are a far more palatable £279 monthly.



    Should I Buy Out My Car Lease? #car #transport


    #buy my car
    #

    Should I buy out my car lease?

    Dear Driving for Dollars,

    More On Cars:

    “auto”

    Dear Eric,

    You are not the only one contemplating that question. Thanks to many great lease deals over the past few years, car leases are again on the rise and many of those leases are starting to come to the end of the lease term.

    You’ve already answered the biggest factor in deciding whether to buy the car you’ve been leasing. You like the car and would be happy driving it longer. The next step is to look at the costs associated with this transaction.

    Start by looking at your lease contract to see what the residual value is. This is the cost for you to buy the car. In addition, there may be a purchase fee of as much as a few hundred dollars that might be required as well, so be sure to factor that in if it’s in your contract. Next, do some research at car-pricing sites online such as Edmunds.com or Kelley Blue Book to determine what your car is worth compared with your cost to buy it.

    Remember that you will be paying extra if you turn the leased car in and it has damage or you are over the mileage limits. You won’t pay these costs if you buy the car at the end of the lease, so you could consider that a savings as you make your decision.

    If you find that the cost to buy the car is higher than the market value and you still want to buy the car, you may be able to negotiate the price downward. Call the lessor on your contract to see if there is room to negotiate and be prepared to provide copies of your online research.

    Get more news, money-saving tips and expert advice by signing up for a free Bankrate newsletter .



    Should I Buy a New Car? 6 Reasons to Buy a New Car over a Used Car #car #tax #bands


    #new used cars
    #

    Should I Buy a New Car? 6 Reasons to Buy a New Car over a Used Car

    By Jason Steele

    Despite big promotional events and appealing advertisements, new cars come with hefty price tags and lose their value very quickly due to depreciation. In fact, there are many benefits to buying a used car for cheap over a brand new one.

    However, there are a few specific occasions when a new car isn t just a luxury indulgence and a way to pamper yourself. It actually makes more sense to buy new in these cases.

    Benefits of Buying a New Car

    1. New Safety Technology

    In the automobile industry, the amazing power of computer processors has sparked a technology revolution, and manufacturers are finally using technology to enhance safety. When you spend on a new car, you can find advanced safety features including:

    • Stability control
    • Adaptive cruise control
    • Lane departure warning
    • Blind spot monitoring
    • Rear-view camera

    As with earlier developments like anti-lock brakes, these new features are quickly trickling down from high-end luxury cars to family sedans and even economy brands. It s too soon to find them in most used vehicles, but you can find affordable new cars with great safety features.

    2. Fuel Efficiency Breakthroughs

    Federal regulations have average fuel efficiency set to rocket from 27.5 MPG in 2010 to 39 MPG by 2016. While small fuel efficient cars have been on the market for a few years, the mileage ratings of other vehicles usually the more budget-friendly cars have languished until now. In the next few years you ll see minivans, pickup trucks, luxury cars, and even sports cars posting efficiency numbers that were once only found in hybrids and small economy cars.

    If you put a lot of mileage on your car, you can balance upfront cost of a new car with the long-term savings of a more efficient engine (especially with gas prices rising ).

    3. Alternative Energy Advances

    Though the ethanol boom has faded, other alternative energy trends are here to stay. Pure electric vehicles like the new Nissan Leaf and the Ford Focus Electric promise to dramatically cut energy costs per mile driven. Their equivalent fuel economy ratings are in the triple digits. making a Toyota Prius look like a gas guzzler. Not to be outdone, GM is now selling the Chevrolet Volt, their plug-in hybrid that will run on either gas or electricity. A plug-in Prius and the Ford C-Max Energi should also hit the market next year.

    Don t forget that electric cars aren t the only alternative-fuel vehicles. Diesel-engine cars, long popular in Europe, are making a big comeback in North America. They offer very high mileage, especially on the highway. Honda even sells a methane-powered version of the Civic, which is in high demand in parts of the country where natural gas is cheap.

    You could save thousands of dollars in energy expenses in just a few years with one of these new vehicles. Electric cars won t be available in the used car market until a few years from now, and they re going to be in very high-demand, which means their prices will be higher than most used cars.

    4. Cars for the Long Haul

    Used cars make sense if you plan to keep a car for a few years and then sell or trade it in for another used car. But if you plan to keep up with maintenance and watch the odometer roll way past 100,000 miles, you may not want the uncertain history that comes with a used car. Rather than worry about a previous owner who skipped oil changes or abused an older car, with a new car you know that you re responsible for gentle driving and regular maintenance. Owning a car for a decade or more will mitigate the initially high taxes and depreciation enough that they will average out to be close to the costs of a used car.

    5. Government Incentives

    Cash for Clunkers came and went, and traditional hybrids no longer earn green energy tax credits. But you can still find plenty of government incentives that cut the price of new electric vehicles, plug-in hybrids, and alternative-fuel vehicles. The natural gas–powered Honda Civic GX, for example, comes with a $4,000 tax credit. If you buy a plug-in hybrid or pure electric car, you ll be entitled to a whopping $7,500 tax credit.

    Remember, this is not just a tax deduction, it s a tax credit. the equivalent of cash back. Learn more about the differences between a tax credit vs. a tax deduction .

    6. Simpler Needs, Simpler Costs

    You might be drawn to a new car by a low advertised price, only to learn from the car dealership that the base price is for a low- or no-frills model. To get the advanced features like cruise control, voice recognition, a navigation system, and seat warmers, you ll deal with a list of expensive options, often adding as much as $10,000 to your total before taxes.

    If you know that you don t want pricey options like pearlescent paint coating, larger wheels, or even an automatic transmission, you ll probably find less of a difference between the prices of new cars and used cars. If you re just trying to get to the office or train station and back, you can custom order a new car from the dealer without all of the unnecessary options and get a competitive price for a brand new car.

    Final Word

    Anyone who tells you that the new car vs. used car debate has an absolute winner hasn t really considered every circumstance.

    In most situations, a used car is the lower-cost, higher-value option. But with recent advances in technology and government incentives, new cars have enough significant benefits that they re often worth the extra expense. It s up to you as a smart consumer to weigh your needs against the costs and benefits of both new and used cars. Don t be surprised if you occasionally find that the new car represents better value.

    Was your most recent car purchase a new or used vehicle? How did you finally make the decision?



    Should you lease or buy a car? #mccarthy #call #a #car


    #lease a car
    #

    Should you lease or buy a car?

    (AOL Autos ) — Car leasing is a lot like renting an apartment; you pay a monthly fee to use it but don’t own it — and aren’t making payments toward ownership. The leased vehicle remains the property of the lessor — the company that issued the lease.

    Today’s car buyer has many choices when it comes to buying or renting a new car.

    As with an apartment rental contract, car leasing will have a fixed period — typically two or three years. You’re obliged to make monthly payments for the length of the contract. While you can get out of the lease before then if you want to, there will typically be extra costs — for example, an early termination charge — typically spelled out in the car leasing contract you sign.

    And as is often the case with renting an apartment, you’ll likely have to put down some cash as security deposit at the lease inception. This money will be used to pay for any damages to the vehicle — such as door dings, stains on the seats, any needed service work, etc. — when you return it at the end of the car leasing term.

    A big advantage of car leasing is flexibility. You aren’t making a long-term commitment. Typically, car leasing is for a relatively short period, 2-3 years being the norm. The average new car loan, on the other hand, is five years. When the lease period is up, you can simply bring the car back and walk away.

    Or you can buy it if you like by paying off the remaining balance — called the residual value — which you’ll negotiate in advance at the time of lease inception.

    Or go shopping for a new car — or no car at all.

    You have many choices.

    Don’t Miss

    Also, since you are only renting the car, your total cash outlay should be less. You won’t have to make as large a down payment (a security deposit and the first month’s payment are the typical initial out-of-pocket fees associate with car leasing) as you would if you were buying.

    And monthly lease payments are almost always less than payments would be if you bought the car. That means you’ll have more money left over to spend on other things. AOL Autos: Best lease deals this month

    Or, if you prefer, you can afford to drive a more expensive car when you lease, since the monthly payments will be comparatively lower. This is one of the biggest single attractions of car leasing for many people. A car (or truck) that might cost you $500-$600 per month to buy might cost $100 per month less with car leasing. AOL Autos: Best finance deals this Month

    Another nice thing about car leasing is that you’re always driving a new or nearly new vehicle. And of course you don’t have to worry about the potentially expensive repair and/or maintenance problems that inevitably crop up as a car ages — and gets out of warranty.

    The leased car will typically be under factory warranty for the duration of the lease — and car leasing contracts often have add-on provisos that cover routine maintenance, such as oil changes, etc. AOL Autos: Cheap luxury cars

    Car leasing may also have tax advantages for you — but this is something you’ll have to ask your accountant about. In the past, most people who did car leasing were those who used their vehicle for business, such as realtors — and who therefore could claim deductions for car leasing not available to those who purchased them outright.

    Car leasing had the additional attraction of freeing up assets for investments and so on that would otherwise be locked into a depreciating asset — the person’s car or truck. AOL Autos: Cheap trucks

    There are downsides to car leasing, of course. Since you’re only making what amount to rental payments each month, you won’t have anything tangible to show for your money at the end of the lease. If you spend, say, $12,000 on car leasing payments (about $450 per month) over two years, that money is gone forever. AOL Autos: How to negotiate financing

    A person who buys his vehicle, on the other hand, has the comfort of knowing that one day, it will be paid for and — assuming it is still in good shape at that point — will provide free transportation until it breaks down or the owner decides to get rid of it.

    In addition, a person who owns his car has equity (cash value) in the car or truck. Even though it will continue to depreciate with each passing year, so long as it’s still serviceable transportation, it will always be worth something. That value can be used as a trade-in; or the vehicle can be sold privately to help raise money to pay for a new one — or for some other need.

    The person who opts for car leasing must start from scratch every time.

    There’s also the mileage issue. If you decide on car leasing, your contract will typically stipulate the maximum number of miles you’re allowed before the end of the lease. If you exceed that figure, it can get expensive.

    Per-mile charges over the stated maximum listed in the car leasing contract are often exorbitant — so if you drive more than the allowed miles in the contract annually, leasing could turn out to be more expensive then you thought.

    The person who owns his car, meanwhile, can drive it as much as he wants, and do pretty much whatever he feels like with it, too. He can swap out the stereo, add different wheels and tires, change the exhaust system — whatever. Do this with a leased car and you’ll have to pay whatever if takes to put the car back the way it was. If you own your vehicle, the inevitable door dings and dents — as well as coffee stains on the seat — can also be shrugged off.

    People who lease their vehicles, on the other hand, can expect to be charged for every nick, tear or spill at the end of the lease. The cost of these repairs will be deducted from the security deposit.

    Car leasing is also more complex than buying so always closely read — and be sure you understand — every proviso of the lease contract before you sign. If you’re unclear about anything, get expert advice — or walk away.

    E-mail to a friend



    Should You Sell Your Car or Repair It? #what #is #my #used #car #worth


    #sell car
    #

    Should You Sell Your Car or Repair It?

    Home > Financial Help > Should You Sell Your Car or Repair It?

    Vehicle problems may be one of the most frustrating expenses to me.  Most people are striving to prevent vehicles from becoming budget busters .  We all know vehicles are mechanical and have electronic components.  Murphy’s Law says anything that can go wrong will go wrong.  So, just relax and realize we re all going to have vehicle troubles sooner or later.

    Such troubles always seem to come at the most inconvenient of times, don’t they?  There are many people who work hard to get out of vehicle debt.  Yet, they get their vehicle paid off and Murphy (from Dave Ramsey) is around the corner with some sort of problem.  Or, Murphy creeps in just a short time after buying a car.

    My Murphy was a VW Passat which we thought was a cool car at the time.  We took out a loan and bought it used [car loan=BIG mistake].  Yep, just a few weeks later we had our first minor mechanical failure.  Then, it seemed like problems came one after another until a 3-4 years into owning the car the big one arrived.  A problem under the hood would require us to spend over a thousand dollars for a repair.  By this time, the car was paid off, but we had reached our pain threshold, so we cried uncle and sold it to the mechanic.

    That decision put us back into car debt for another 4 years.  Was it the right decision?  I don’t know.  I certainly don’t think the issue and issues to come would have added up to what we paid for our new used car (Honda Civic).  So, one could argue we’d be better off financially having ran the course with the Passat.  However, one might consider the type of car we purchased and reasonably see that we could save a lot more money in the long-run with a Honda Civic which may drive 200,000 miles requiring little problem resolution.

    Should you sell your car or repair it?

    I suppose that’s the question several people face and it’s not an easy one to answer.  At least for those that want to avoid car debt.

    I recently read some good advice from Dave Ramsey on his new personal finance iPhone app about this particular subject that nicely fits the situation I’ve described.

    Dave says you get another car for two reasons:

    • Safety – you don’t want to drive anything unsafe
    • The hassle factor.  Sometimes it’s time to sell and get another car when the maintenance is driving you nuts.

    Almost always it’s cheaper to pay for repairs versus making a payment on a vehicle.  I would agree.  At least in the first 5 years, but some cars have Murphy sitting in the backseat.  For those cars (my Passat), I think you have to guess whether or not Murphy is going to stay around indefinitely.  If so, you might just reason you’re going with the hassle factor. unload the vehicle and try to save in the long-run.

    Of course, if you opt to sell you’ll want to avoid going into debt on your new used car or at least minimize it (unlike what we did).  In hindsight, I think I made the right decision to unload the car, but I should have minimized the debt, or purchased an older Honda Civic and continued to save for the upgraded Honda Civic.

    What are your thoughts?  Would you sell your issue prone vehicle or stick it out for the long-run?



    Should You Trade In Your Car or Sell It Yourself? US News #value #of #used #cars


    #trade in your car
    #

    How to drive up the price with tune-ups and effective promotion.

    For many car owners looking to sell their vehicle, a dealership is their first and last stop. But experts say those who are determined, patient and willing to take initiative can get a better offer by bypassing the dealership and selling their own automobile.

    While selling a used car on your own can prove profitable, it can also be challenging. Here are tips from the pros on how to determine your car’s retail value, highlight its best features and lock in a prospective buyer:

    Pinpoint your asking price. Start with a website like KelleyBlueBook.com to get a rough estimate of how much your car is worth. Plug in as many details as possible, such as a built-in navigation system, CD player, premium sound and leather upholstery, since they may increase the value of your vehicle. The website will then estimate your car’s private party value (a price KBB projects you can get in a sale from consumer to consumer). David Weliver, a former car salesman and publisher of the Money Under 30 blog, says although KBB puts a specific dollar value on a car’s worth, it’s best to use the calculation to figure out a range for the vehicle’s retail value rather than making it your asking price.

    To narrow down the range, compare your car to other vehicles of the same year and model with similar mileage. Check out websites such as AutoTrader.com, Craigslist.org and eBay.com/motors, which host thousands of advertisements for used cars from private parties. It can also help to get quotes from several local dealerships.

    Adam Goldfein, host of the TV show AutoScoop on CW69 in Atlanta, says sellers should generally stay within 5 percent of what they think is a fair asking price. Setting the price too high can make buyers automatically disregard your advertisement, while pricing the car too low can raise a red flag. If everyone is selling your Honda model for $20,000 and you’re asking for $16,000, I’d be skeptical, Goldfein says.

    Take the time for a tune-up. Simply giving the car a wash and hanging a new air freshener won’t cut it. Fixing low-maintenance items like worn brake pads, weathered tires and rusted rotors requires little time and shows buyers you take good care of the car. People want ready-to-drive cars, Weliver says, not something they have to take to the shop.

    Joe Wiesenfelder, executive editor of cars.com, recommends removing all personal items, including political bumper stickers. Do you want to sell to someone who has the same political views as you, or do you just want to sell the car? Wiesenfelder says. Some decals can be hard to remove without damaging the paint, so it may be worth paying for a professional detailing, which starts around $100 and includes cleaning, waxing and polishing of both the interior and exterior.

    It’s also crucial to take your vehicle to a mechanic to make sure there are no major problems. Many consumers will want to have the car inspected anyway, so taking the initiative can save time and establish trust with the buyer. Present the buyer a copy of the mechanic’s summary and, if possible, your vehicle’s history report.

    If you choose to commission repairs, pay close attention to the driver-side door, window and handle, as people see those parts before they take a test drive, says Phil Reed, senior consumer advice editor at Edmunds.com. While at the shop, you can ask your mechanic for recommendations on buyers; he or she may know if any customers are in the market for a used car. Some mechanics may even decide to buy the car from you, Wiesenfelder says, since they can fix it and then try to flip it for a profit.

    Promote effectively. Consider advertising on AutoTrader, CraigsList and eBayMotors (the sites useful for preliminary research). Goldfein offers these recommendations on how to take high-quality photographs for your listing:

    • Make sure nothing in the background matches the color of your car.



    Suzuki cars leave the US. So should you buy one? #car #spares


    #suzuki cars
    #

    By John Voelcker. Guest blogger November 11, 2012

    There’s nothing like a bargain price on a brand-new car.

    And since Suzuki  has announced that it’ll stop selling cars in the U.S.. there are bargains galore on new Suzuki models.

    It also depends on whether your local Suzuki dealer plans to stick around for a few years to service the cars, or whether it plans to close its Suzuki business and transfer warranty claims work to another dealer somewhere further away.

    But, first, the purchase price on that new Suzuki–which likely just got lower.

    As the case of Saab just this past January showed, dealers may offer 25 percent or more off the new-car sticker price  when a brand pulls out of the market.

    The tactic worked, too: An Ohio Saab dealer sold 55 of its 122 new cars  in one week by slashing prices 25 to 45 percent.

    We know of a Detroit buyer who was able to get $4,000 off the $20,399 price of a brand-new 2013 Suzuki SX4  with all-wheel drive and the value package that includes a navigation system. He closed that sale yesterday.

    Unlike Saab, however, Japanese carmaker Suzuki isn’t defunct, however; only its U.S. unit declared bankruptcy.

    That means that not only will parts continue to be available, but that warranties on existing Suzukis will continue to be honored, and parts availability shouldn’t be a problem.

    When Saab declared bankruptcy last December after several failed sale attempts, its dealers were left without warranties on their brand-new cars–and had to sell them that way.

    That Ohio Saab dealer created a $1,995 service contract for 60,000 miles to substitute for the defunct factory warranty.

    Suzuki dealers won’t have to do that, and owners shouldn’t see any change in warranty coverage.

    But it’s entirely possible that Suzuki buyers will have to travel further to get their cars serviced, if their local dealer shuts down its Suzuki service business before the warranty ends.

    As for parts, because Suzuki is a global automaker and will continue to supply replacement components for its cars elsewhere in the world, service parts shouldn’t be a problem.

    That ensures that owners (and former Suzuki dealers) can at least get the parts that independent service mechanics need to keep their cars on the road.

    In June, the parts-making piece of Saab (which wasn’t part of the bankrupt carmaker) set up a new U.S. company that will continue to sell parts for Saabs .

    Another factor to consider: Potential buyers should check carefully with their financial institutions if they don’t plan on getting a purchase loan through the dealership.

    Some banks have more restrictive policies about writing loans for new cars from dead automakers.

    Other defunct brands include not only Saab, but also Saturn. Pontiac, HUMMER, Oldsmobile. Plymouth, Isuzu. Daihatsu. and more.

    In the end, buyers should consider not only whether a new Suzuki represents value for money, but whether it’s a car they really want to drive and live with for several years.

    Except for the Kizashi sport sedan–larger than a compact, but smaller than a mid-size–Suzuki’s lineup of cars and crossovers  is now old and not particularly refined.

    The SX4 hatchback  offered a model that was the lowest-priced all-wheel drive car sold in the U.S. but it and the sister sedan model are now in their seventh model year.

    Similarly, the Grand Vitara is aging and uncompetitive on equipment.

    And most Suzuki models have lower EPA gas-mileage ratings than competing cars from other makers.

    So if you like the price you can get on a new Suzuki, make sure you like the car.

    Then weigh the risks carefully. and quiz your dealership about its future plans.



    Should you buy a used car? #car #insurance #comparison


    #buy used car
    #

    Should you buy a used car?

    By Aaron Gold. Cars Expert

    Aaron Gold, About.com s Cars Expert, has been an automotive journalist for a decade and a half and has been writing for About.com since 2004. He contributes to several automotive publications and is a member of the North American Car and Truck of the Year jury.

    Continue Reading Below

    The same car for less money

    When you buy used, you miss out on the heaviest depreciation hit. A new entry-level Honda Accord will set you back around $25,000. Buy a similarly-equipped two-year-old Accord with 24,000 miles and you ll pay about $6,000 less. (And that s for a car that holds its value well. A Chevrolet Malibu costs about the same as an Accord; 2 years and 24,000 miles later it s $10,000 cheaper.)

    More car for the same money

    A new mid-level Toyota Corolla  will set you back around $21,000.

    But what if you want something bigger? For the same amount of money, you could buy a two-year-old top-of-the-line Toyota Camry  with a leather interior. Planning on growing your family? You ll find plenty of four-year-old HSUVs and minivans in the new Corolla s price range.

    You can also move up in prestige. A new Toyota Camry XLE V6 with all the bells and whistles is a nice ride; at $35,000 it had better be. But for the same price (or even a couple grand less), you could be stylin in a two-year-old Lexus ES. Audi A6 or BMW 3-series .

    Continue Reading Below

    Certified pre-owned (CPO): Used cars with new benefits

    More and more manufacturers offer certified pre-owned programs. Cars sold as certified pre-owned (CPO) bridge the gap between new and used. They are subject to a rigorous inspection and repair process, and usually are covered by a warranty from the manufacturer. CPO cars will usually cost more than non-CPO cars, but the added warranty and peace of mind makes them a good value.

    Why not buy used?

    Are there disadvantages to buying used? Definitely. New cars are covered by a comprehensive zero-deductable warranty; if your used car breaks, you will have to pay for repairs (or a deductible if you buy an extended warranty ). Also, a used car will need wear items, such as tires and brakes, replaced sooner than a new car, items that are usually not covered under warranty. And most cars require rather expensive servicing around the 50,000 and 100,000 mile marks; a used car will be closer to those intervals. (See my tips for keeping your car running forever .) If you re looking at lowering your overall costs, rather than just your purchase costs, you may be better off with an inexpensive new car .

    Financing is generally more expensive for used cars (though this may be offset by cheaper insurance rates), and if you prefer to lease. a used car probably isn t a viable option. By buying a used car, you may be missing out on some of the latest-and-greatest safety and technical gadgets. And, of course, there s that new car smell. Let s face it: Having a new car is a great feeling.

    In the end, all of these things have a price, often several thousand dollars. Is it worth it? That s up to you — but if you re looking to stretch your car-buying dollar as far as possible, buying used is a sensible option.



    Should I buy a car through my business? #car #auctions #sydney


    #buy my car
    #

    Buying a car through your business rather than on a personal plan could work out much cheaper

    7:00AM GMT 16 Feb 2014

    Comments

    I’m frequently struck by how much cheaper it appears to be if you lease a car through a business rather than going down the Personal Contract Purchase (PCP) route. The reason this topic interests me is that as a small business owner I, like many people I imagine, could pay for running a new car using either method.

    Buy a car through your company on a scheme such as contract hire and you’ll pay a lower monthly headline figure than through a PCP. And over the term of a loan usually three or four years that adds up to a significant sum.

    To run a £28,675 BMW 318d Sport for four years through a personal payment scheme, a PCP could cost nearly £3,500 more than leasing the car through a company. In both instances, the driver would be putting up a deposit of £1,674 and running the car for 48 months. However, where under the personal scheme the finance would need to be repaid at a rate of £342 a month, under the business scheme the repayments are a far more palatable £279 monthly.



    Should I Sell My Car? #best #hybrid #cars


    #sell my car
    #

    Ask the Readers: Should I Sell My Car?

    Published on February 11th, 2011

    The Friday Ask the Readers column generally follows a set format: I introduce the topic, share a reader e-mail, give my best advice, and then ask for your feedback. Today s column is a little different. Sarah sent me a 1000-word question, and rather than write any sort of response, I m just going to let her have the entire space. Everything that follows is from Sarah.

    I have a question for other GRS readers. It’s a simple question: Should I sell my car? It actually seems to have a very simple answer: Yes.

    I keep writing lists and outlining the reasons why I should sell my car (and why I shouldn’t), and the balance lies very clearly in favor of selling my car. And yet I’m having the hardest time selling my car.

    Why? I’m a practical, logical, pragmatic person. Why is this so hard to do? Why is selling my car so difficult? Even with the facts laid out, staring me in the face, I’m having the hardest time selling my car.

    Why I Bought a Car in the First Place

    I used to live completely car-free. I lived in different cities and only walked, bused, or biked to get around occasionally living the high life and taking a taxi when I felt like being luxurious. And then I moved to California.

    I bought a car last year. I purchased a 2010 Toyota Matrix from a dealer, priced at $17,490, with a $1000 rebate for being a recent college grad. The Kelly Blue Book value of the car, at new, was $20,049. My purchase price was $16,490. With taxes, registration, and fees, I forked over $19,009. As a somewhat-savvy consumer, I secured a three-year financing plan with 0% interest.

    I bought the car because I lived 40 miles from my job, commuting an hour each way (through San Francisco, across the Golden Gate Bridge), and there wasn’t sufficient public transportation to get me to and from my job.

    I ve now owned (and paid for) the car for 12 months, spending $6800 on car payments. I have $12,200 left to pay on the car over a two-year period.

    The cost of the car has been unbelievable. In one year, these are the costs:

    • Car payments $529 per month
    • 20,000 miles total
      • 25 mpg average
      • gas price is $3.15 in California
      • $2520 for gas, or
      • $210 per month in gasoline
    • Maintenance for one year (four tune-ups at $109 each) $436 ($36 per month for maintenance)
    • Insurance $109 per month for insurance (AAA)
    • Bridge Tolls (crossing the Golden Gate Bridge every day costs $5) $80 per month
    • Parking. I’m lucky to have free parking, mostly, unless I drive downtown $50 per month is my average for parking

    Every month, I spend about $1014 on driving and owning the car. $1014! This is roughly one third of my take-home income. What would I do with $1014 per month.

    In addition, I have a substantial amount of debt from undergraduate and graduate student loans (in the realm of $80,000) that I’m currently working hard to pay off. The student loan payments are $679 per month. I struggle to make the car payment and the student loan payment each month.

    Today: The Current Situation

    In November, I moved back to San Francisco, because I couldn’t stand the long commute. Commuting through city traffic is tiring and psychologically draining; I quickly remembered why I dislike driving so much. In contrast, San Francisco is a hub of public transportation options sometimes better or worse, depending on the neighborhood that you live in.

    I now live eight miles from my job in Sausalito. The drive takes about 15-20 minutes, depending on traffic. Parking at my job is easy, but parking in San Francisco is a nightmare it can take up to 40 minutes to find a parking spot. I have the option of purchasing a parking spot, but those cost upwards of $300 in a city like San Francisco, and I can’t stomach how much I’m already spending on the car alone.

    I now have alterative means for getting to work. For example, I can bike to work a few days per week, depending on the day and the weather. There s also a bus line that goes to and from my work on the hour, and takes about 30-40 minutes to get to work (it doubles my commute time, but I don’t have to worry about parking, driving, or concentrating on the road).

    The (Easy) Conclusions

    I worry that it’s a mistake to sell my car after owning it for one year. My parents tell me that I should wait it out for the next two years, buckle down, and just finish making the payments because I need a car and can’t possibly live without one. People suggest that it’s foolish to buy a brand new car and sell a car within the first year of ownership.

    However, I also think that sunk costs are sunk costs. What I’ve already spent on the car is gone; it s what I spend in the future that s still up for determination. I think it makes sense for me to sell my car.

    Here are some reasons I think I should sell my car:

    • Living in a city with ample public transportation, alternative car-sharing options, bicycle riding, and walking makes having a car a luxury, not a necessity.
  • Getting rid of $12,200 of unpaid debt is a good thing.
  • There are additional costs to car ownership insurance, gas, parking, maintenance that will continue to add up over time. (To the tune of about $450 per month.)
  • The current value of my car ($14,000) is more than I owe on my payments ($12,200)
  • But wait! There s more!

    • A car is a depreciating asset, and will not add any value over time. Struggling to make these payments does not help me reduce or eliminate debt in other areas of my life.
  • Public transportation to work costs $4 each way, or approximately $160 per month.
  • If I also choose to use a car-sharing program on the weekends, I would spend between $50 and $75 for a weekend use but the cost would be elective, and not fixed.
  • If I don’t spend the money on the car, I can spend the money on other things that are more important.
  • It seems painfully clear, on paper, that I should sell my car. And yet I get in and drive it every single day to teach swim lesson after work, to dinner parties, to events, on trips to Tahoe, on excursions. I am afraid of selling my car. Psychologically and emotionally, I’m attached to it. I also stubbornly don’t want to admit I made a mistake in buying the car in the first place.

    So tell me, fellow GRS readers, what should I do? Can I afford to sell my car? Can I afford not to?

    J.D. s note: Though I don t have room for my traditional long reply, I ll just chime in to say I m glad that Sarah mentioned sunk costs. That s a very important thing to remember in making these sorts of decisions. (What you ve spent already is irrelevant; it s what you spend going forward that matters.) And I think her situation highlights why it s often best to buy a cheap used car than a brand-new one. I think a $2,000 beater would be perfect for her.

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