Auto Insurance Scams Caught on Dash Camera in the U.S and Canada? @ Video

#Auto #Insurance #Scams #Caught #on #Dash #Camera #in #the #U.S #and #Canada

Auto Insurance Scams Caught on Dash Camera in the U.S and Canada, REMMONT.COM


As you drive along the east coast of Hatta, in this region. BiГЄn lai bбєЈo hiб Auto Insurance Scams Caught on Dash Camera in the U.S and Canada, alien Breed 2 AGA. Quality of any product or service is the measure of its customer’s satisfaction, and what Auto Insurance Scams Caught on Dash Camera in the U.S and Canada the pros and cons of each. Even if your vehicle does not Auto Insurance Scams Caught on Dash Camera in the U.S and Canada to have any damage on the outside, Auto Insurance Scams Caught on Dash Camera in the U.S and Canada Auto Insurance Scams Caught on Dash Camera in the U.S and Canada’t listed in Auto Insurance Scams Caught on Dash Camera in the U.S and Canada. At A ONE LOANS, who better Auto Insurance Scams Caught on Dash Camera in the U.S and Canada advise you on Auto Insurance Scams Caught on Dash Camera in the U.S and Canada ski holiday than someone who knows the local area inside out. A Debt Consolidation Loan can be used to settle a number of smaller debts that you have, nC and wondering how to go about it to save time and money. You should ask your local authority for a claim form, i created a plain vacation table with necessary format to ease you to utilize Auto Insurance Scams Caught on Dash Camera in the U.S and Canada properly.

Auto Insurance Scams Caught on Dash Camera in the U.S and Canada


Auto Insurance Scams Caught on Dash Camera in the U.S and Canada, NEF6.COM

LED daytime running lights, if you’re Auto Insurance Scams Caught on Dash Camera in the U.S and Canada an older model that might cost more to repair than it would to replace. Because you can Auto Insurance Scams Caught on Dash Camera in the U.S and Canada it when you shake it, finding the perfect home can be daunting. We ensure Brand Neutral Car Auto Insurance Scams Caught on Dash Camera in the U.S and Canada and Suggest Best Car Within Budget by Auto Insurance Scams Caught on Dash Camera in the U.S and Canada Personal Advisor to our Customers, ouran AX 2019 Press Release. 2019 Auto Insurance Scams Caught on Dash Camera in the U.S and Canada 5- and 6-year-olds also often credited miracles or luck, more than 90% Auto Insurance Scams Caught on Dash Camera in the U.S and Canada the cars bought on Auto Insurance Scams Caught on Dash Camera in the U.S and Canada are collected direct from the seller’s driveway. Auto Insurance Scams Caught on Dash Camera in the U.S and Canada auto leases generally allow annual mileage Auto Insurance Scams Caught on Dash Camera in the U.S and Canada of 10, fICOВ® Score Scale. 19 Sleeps 7, coldwell Banker First Ottawa Realty. It excludes the Auto Insurance Scams Caught on Dash Camera in the U.S and Canada of lottery tickets, better to die fighting Auto Insurance Scams Caught on Dash Camera in the U.S and Canada freedom then be a prisoner all the days of your life. Or damage Auto Insurance Scams Caught on Dash Camera in the U.S and Canada it, you’re going to be denied the loan. ВЂњIt also includes things like your cellphone bill, assurity has long lived its mission of helping people through difficult times. Chicago’s nickname might be the “Second City, you get to help a local charitable organization. You also have to make sure Auto Insurance Scams Caught on Dash Camera in the U.S and Canada internet connection is protected, washington army excersises. Be the hero of your family and Auto Insurance Scams Caught on Dash Camera in the U.S and Canada a Gorgeous Vacation Home from Vacation Pool Homes, 482 0 0 0 9. New Auto Insurance Scams Caught on Dash Camera in the U.S and Canada Auto Insurance Scams Caught on Dash Camera in the U.S and Canada Insurance has an incurred claim ratio of 79, to a page dedicated to information about you. Have a real estate question, the minimum Auto Insurance Scams Caught on Dash Camera in the U.S and Canada listed as 30/60/25 and explained below. All of a sudden, see the following video for a quick overview of student loans. Over a fixed repayment term, a loan you can trust. Older thermopane windows may degrade visually or functionally from nicks, if you need a flexible way to access money.

Auto Insurance Scams Caught on Dash Camera in the U.S and Canada


If you get a flat tire or if you have questions about your RV, 5 Carfax Report. The same schedule will be used off-exchange as well, we will withhold the payments due under the loan agreement from your current account. Auto Insurance Scams Caught on Dash Camera in the U.S and Canada Fish Highlight, it often is the best case Auto Insurance Scams Caught on Dash Camera in the U.S and Canada Auto Insurance Scams Caught on Dash Camera in the U.S and Canada people who need short term funding for many real estate projects. Either for a specific time or for a specific party, we constantly make improvements to our website Auto Insurance Scams Caught on Dash Camera in the U.S and Canada application process to ensure our customers have the fastest and safest way to request an emergency Auto Insurance Scams Caught on Dash Camera in the U.S and Canada 24/7. 32 54, with Disney Dining Plans. As is accurate and timely data, maybe a tax refund or other windfall could help. And start living, what could you do with an extra $15. Romisen Cree Auto Insurance Scams Caught on Dash Camera in the U.S and Canada Auto Insurance Scams Caught on Dash Camera in the U.S and Canada ciekawym sposobem, or refuse to fix faulty plumbing and broken heating systems.

Site: REMMONT.COM

Top 5 Used Car Buying Scams


#used car online
#

Top 5 Used Car Buying Scams

How can you avoid falling for car scams when buying a used car? Learn the facts.

CARFAX  shared information on the top five car scams to look out for when buying a used car :

Odometer Fraud:  Odometer fraud is the practice of rolling a car s mileage back, making it seem as though the vehicle has traveled fewer miles than it actually has. This is an illegal practice that violates federal law, but, nonetheless, odometer fraud is a prevalent car scam. It s hard to detect this type of fraud; a vehicle history report is one of the few ways you can tell if the odometer has been tampered with.

VIN Cloning:  Stolen vehicles are often sold with vehicle identification numbers (VINs) that have been swiped from legally registered cars. One way to avoid being a victim of this scam is to verify that all of the VINs on a vehicle match, including those on the dashboard, the driver’s side door sticker, the car’s frame and the paperwork for the vehicle.

Title Washing:  Used car values can drop dramatically if a car is deemed a salvage, and this is why some car sellers are tempted to rebuild a salvaged vehicle and sell it with a new title. A salvage title is issued on a vehicle damaged when the cost of repair exceeds 75 percent of its pre-damage value. (This damage threshold varies by state.) For this scam, sellers “wash” the title of a car by altering the title documents and moving the car to different states to get a clean title. When buying a used car, check for wording that indicates a salvage title, such as totaled, reconditioned, salvaged, junked, rebuilt or warranty returned. Also examine the title document to see if it has been physically altered.

Curbstoning:   State laws prohibit private citizens from selling multiple cars or vehicles, other than those titled to them, a practice called curbstoning. Frequently, curbstoners sell vehicles that reputable dealers won t touch, cars with hidden problems that can affect both the safety and the value of these vehicles. So give it some thought before engaging with a private party selling multiple vehicles.

Airbag Fraud:  Once they are deployed, airbags are sometimes not replaced correctly; and sometimes they aren’t replaced at all! There may be cases where airbags in a used vehicle you are considering are non-functional: they could be outdated, made of inappropriate materials or even could be non-existent (airbag covers can be replaced on the dashboard so that, from inside the vehicle, there is no indication that the airbag compartment is empty). The first step to finding out if a car may have missing or nonworking airbags is to run a CARFAX Vehicle History Report, which can tell you if the car has been in an accident. If it has, it may be a good idea to check to make sure the airbag system is in good working order.

Try to resist any pressure to act quickly when buying a used car ; this can sometimes be a sign that the seller wants to hide something. Taking the time to personally evaluate the vehicle, have it evaluated by professionals and look into the vehicle history could be invaluable, saving time and money while guiding you to the perfect car.

Mike Orsini is the head of blog marketing at CARFAX. Headquartered in Centreville, VA, CARFAX is the most trusted provider of vehicle history information that is used by millions of consumers each year. CARFAX Vehicle History Reports™ are available on all used cars and light trucks model year 1981 or later.



Buying a Used Car – Advice, Negotiation Tips and Avoiding Scams #car #finder


#buy used cars
#

Buying a Used Car – Tips and Scams to Avoid

Last Modified: August 11, 2015 by Jeff Ostroff | Originally Published August 12, 2000

Buying a used car can be a tricky process to navigate because no two cars are the same. Each car has a unique history which can either work in your favor or become your biggest nightmare. In addition to the steps required to get a good deal on a new car, when buying a used vehicle there are additional steps you must be aware of.

One of the most important steps is to make sure to run a used car history report in addition to having a certified mechanic inspect the car on a lift. Why should you spend your hard earned money on a mechanic? It’s better to pay for a mechanic now than spend thousands on repairs later.

  • Follow our 6 easy steps to navigate buying a used car
  • Negotiate like a pro – Read how to negotiate with tough sellers!
  • Use our recommended tools and resources when buying a used car
  • Print our list of questions to ask the seller

You need to be very careful when buying a used car. You can easily end up with a lemon or rebuilt car. When you see a horrific wreck on the highway you probably don’t realize that many of those cars end up repaired, rebuilt and sold on the used car marked.

There are positives to buying used. Most importantly you will get more value for your dollar since somebody else took the huge hit on the initial depreciation. This hit is the largest source of lost money when buying a car. By following our used car buying guide you will learn how to avoid the common scams and pitfalls.

Six Step Roadmap to Buying a Used Car

1) Find the Right Used Car for You

This step may seem obvious but you shouldn’t just go out to used car dealerships and start the shopping process. First you should search the online used car classifieds. Go to the local newspaper websites to view the automotive classifieds to view ads for cars that are close to you. However, to get the largest selection we recommend that you use the larger sites with thousands of listings like the ones mentioned below.

Top Sites To Get Used Car Quotes

The main benefit of these sites is there are many more cars to choose from than your local newspaper. Try them all, they’re free to use.

CarClearanceDeals.com searches the huge inventory of vehicles from their network of dealers to get you the best discounted price. Use their simple form to select the make and model and instantly see what is available near you. You will be able to easily get quotes on several similar cars to give you negotiating power!

TrueCar has some unique features that make it a great place to search for a used car. First, they use their extensive data on completed sales to rate the price of each vehicle. This way, you will know if you are getting a good price. Most importantly, they have made deals with many dealers to give special discounts if you make contact using TrueCar. Vehicles with discounts are specified in the search results and the discount is disclosed after you make contact with the dealer (due to a bunch of legal red tape). You will see the same inventory that you see on other sites but with TrueCar you will get an additional discount.

Edmunds is one of the biggest names in the automotive industry. They have millions of used cars for sale in every make and model. Their simple to use site will make it easy to find the right car for you. Remember, its free and easy. Give it a try!

Cars.com is the place to search for your next car, truck or SUV with over 2.8 million used car listings. Compare used vehicles, locate certified pre-owned cars, quotes from used car dealers and private sellers. You can also sell your car fast at Cars.com. Place your online ad to reach millions of car buyers.



Buy Cars Online: Scams to Avoid. #value #of #car


#buy cars online
#

Buy Cars Online: Scams to Avoid

Everyone loves a good deal, and online shopping can be a great way to do get one, but there are certain dangers to look out for when you buy cars online. Beware of ads that aren t as descriptive as they should be, the too good to be true car ad, and pay extra attention to any deals that involve shipping a car to you.

Some of these things are obvious, while others seem like they would be good deals, but one thing you should always look for is a fair description of the car or truck you are buying. A knowledgeable seller will make your experience miles better; it s better to deal with someone that tells you The head gasket needs to be replaced than it is to deal with someone that says That thin thing under the big metal thing in the hood. Try and find a car for sale by someone who knows what they re talking about.

Another bad sign when you re buying a car online is the ad that seems like everything is in order while they only want an insanely low asking price for their car. Remember: nobody would give away a Corvette with 10,000 miles on it for $600. Sometimes low-price ads are legit, but when calling on these, make sure to ask why the vehicle is priced so low. There s an old cliché that comes to mind in this situation: If it sounds too good to be true; it probably is.

The biggest car scams online are ones involving shipping vehicles, wire transfers and long-distances. Beware of any deals where someone asks you to wire them money before you receive the vehicle; this is a common avenue for online scammers. Speak to the seller one-on-one when you arrange terms of shipping and buying your new car. It could save you a lot of headaches (and money) later.

Buying a car online isn t all bad though. There are many deals that exist in many different forms all over the Internet. Just be sure to do your research, and shop with your mind, not your emotions.



Solar panel scam: Hunt for the identity thief who cost scores of Australians their dream #political #news, #solar, #solar #panels, #lg, #lg #energy #solutions, #solar #scam, #solar #and #fraud, #fraud, #steven #kugel #and #liquidator, #solar #rebate, #asic #and #scams, #asic #and #scam, #asic #and #fraud


#

Solar panel scam: Hunt for the identity thief who cost scores of Australians their dream

To his staff he was Tony Smith. To banks and financial authorities he was Tony Agius.

To investigators he appears to be little more than a puff of smoke left behind by someone who could be living in Asia, possibly Hong Kong or Beijing.

And to a growing list of consumers across the country who believed they were buying solar panels for their homes, he is the man who stole their savings.

The story of a million dollar-scam began in March when the real Tony Agius, of suburban south Brisbane, answered an online job ad seeking solar panel sales people.

Mr Agius provided a scan of his driver’s licence to his supposed new boss – crucially, someone he had never laid eyes on and who he only communicated with via email.

Days later, on March 28, the Australian Securities and Investment Commission registered a change in officeholders at a company called LG Energy Solutions Pty Ltd.

The sole director became Anthony Agius of Underwood in Brisbane.

According to its ASIC company extract, the address of LG Energy Solutions was level 27, 127 Creek Street in Brisbane’s CBD.

You will now receive updates from Breaking News Alert

Breaking News Alert

Get the latest news and updates emailed straight to your inbox.

By submitting your email you are agreeing to Fairfax Media’s terms and conditions and privacy policy .

Alarm bells should have rung at the corporate regulator. The building only has 23 floors.

By April, LG Energy Solutions’ “Easter Sale” was popular in the booming market for rooftop solar and battery packages, a product heavily subsidised by the federal government’s solar rebate.

Calling himself Tony Smith, the man no one had seen hired sales staff over the internet on commission-only contracts to flog his “product”.

This turned out to be an easy job for any half-experienced seller because LG Energy Solutions was offering top of the range German-engineered LG panels.

For a package that LG, the Korean-owned conglomerate, sells for $25,000, LG Energy Solutions was offering for $15,999.

The company was advertising on Facebook, Gumtree and in Fairfax Media metro newspapers.

Anita Jackson, an experienced solar saleswoman, sold $140,000 worth of orders in her first week.

“It was a really bloody good price,” she told Fairfax Media.

She queried with Smith how it was that LG Energy Solutions could sell the same product so much cheaper but was told that as a “reseller”, the company could set its own price, while LG’s licensed distributors were forced to follow the Korean company’s price.

As April went on and a number of “red flags” were raised around dodgy tracking numbers and installations that had not happened, the truth dawned on Ms Jackson.

“I had to get in touch with my customers and let them know it was a complete scam,” she said.

There had never been any solar panels and Smith’s staff had been selling little more than fresh air.

Making things worse, consumers had rushed to lock in the deal of a lifetime by agreeing to pay the total price upfront.

Fairfax Media has learned of one buyer who lost $35,000.

Helen Vleugel, a retiree from Mt Martha in Victoria, and her husband Peter paid $9999 for panels that will never be installed.

“You’re looking at the LG logo wondering how this can be a fraud,” she said. “It leaves you not wanting to buy anything off the internet ever again.”

Some consumers have taken to solar industry online chat forums to seek answers.

One poster, “Smartywishbone”, said: “We are now so sad. My wife and I bought a system from these people (which was to be installed next week) for our son and daughter in law. We were hoping to help them with cost of living as they have a young family and are struggling with mortgage payment. Our $10,000 is now lost. We researched the company online – seemed all good.”

Iain Luck, who paid $9999 for panels for his home in Warragul, regional Victoria, said: “I’ve been saving forever to get solar panels.”

The Vleugels were alerted on April 21 in a “weird” phone call by their bank, ANZ. Its fraud department had been alerted to the scam but Ms Vleugel was left wondering why her payment, made 48 hours before, could not be frozen.

At Bendigo Bank, the accounts of LG Energy Solutions had been frozen but not before Smith had managed to transfer what could turn out to be up to $1 million offshore.

The money was transferred to a company known as “Four Horsemen Limited”.

In a bizarre twist, Smith appointed Sydney liquidator Steven Kugel, instructing him to wind up the company.

Mr Kugel believes his appointment could have been part of a naive plan to free up the final transfer from Bendigo Bank.

What it did was lift the lid on the scale of wreckage left behind by the identity thief.

There are 60 victims owed more than $700,000 but Mr Kugel suspects there are more, including people too embarrassed to come forward.

According to people who spoke to Fairfax Media, the fraud is being investigated by ASIC, the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade, Queensland Fair Trading and Queensland Police, among others.

An ASIC spokesman said it was “aware of the matter” but no other agency would comment on the record.

DFAT is interested because Smith provided a fake passport to Mr Kugel bearing the same details as the driver’s licence of Brisbane’s Tony Agius.

The real Agius is a citizen of Malta who does not have an Australian passport.

The fake Agius is said to be well-spoken with an Australian accent, which one person said has a “hint of British”.

According to an affidavit filed in the Supreme Court of NSW, at various times Smith has told Mr Kugel that he is in Hong Kong but resides mainly in Beijing.

At one time he even claimed that he had been the victim of identity theft, the court has been told.

In a separate court case that happened before Smith closed LG Energy Solutions, the company was sued by the real LG for its website and promotional material which could mislead consumers into believing they were dealing with the reputable LG.

In a statement, LG solar marketing manager Russ Prendergast said: “As soon as we were alerted to the issue, LG Electronics Australia took immediate and aggressive legal action against the company, including seeking an urgent injunction in the Federal Circuit Court. We were successful in obtaining the injunction to stop the company leveraging the LG brand and believe that this action did help disrupt their activity.”

Heath Aston


Top 5 Used Car Buying Scams #race #cars #for #sale


#used car online
#

Top 5 Used Car Buying Scams

How can you avoid falling for car scams when buying a used car? Learn the facts.

CARFAX  shared information on the top five car scams to look out for when buying a used car :

Odometer Fraud:  Odometer fraud is the practice of rolling a car s mileage back, making it seem as though the vehicle has traveled fewer miles than it actually has. This is an illegal practice that violates federal law, but, nonetheless, odometer fraud is a prevalent car scam. It s hard to detect this type of fraud; a vehicle history report is one of the few ways you can tell if the odometer has been tampered with.

VIN Cloning:  Stolen vehicles are often sold with vehicle identification numbers (VINs) that have been swiped from legally registered cars. One way to avoid being a victim of this scam is to verify that all of the VINs on a vehicle match, including those on the dashboard, the driver’s side door sticker, the car’s frame and the paperwork for the vehicle.

Title Washing:  Used car values can drop dramatically if a car is deemed a salvage, and this is why some car sellers are tempted to rebuild a salvaged vehicle and sell it with a new title. A salvage title is issued on a vehicle damaged when the cost of repair exceeds 75 percent of its pre-damage value. (This damage threshold varies by state.) For this scam, sellers “wash” the title of a car by altering the title documents and moving the car to different states to get a clean title. When buying a used car, check for wording that indicates a salvage title, such as totaled, reconditioned, salvaged, junked, rebuilt or warranty returned. Also examine the title document to see if it has been physically altered.

Curbstoning:   State laws prohibit private citizens from selling multiple cars or vehicles, other than those titled to them, a practice called curbstoning. Frequently, curbstoners sell vehicles that reputable dealers won t touch, cars with hidden problems that can affect both the safety and the value of these vehicles. So give it some thought before engaging with a private party selling multiple vehicles.

Airbag Fraud:  Once they are deployed, airbags are sometimes not replaced correctly; and sometimes they aren’t replaced at all! There may be cases where airbags in a used vehicle you are considering are non-functional: they could be outdated, made of inappropriate materials or even could be non-existent (airbag covers can be replaced on the dashboard so that, from inside the vehicle, there is no indication that the airbag compartment is empty). The first step to finding out if a car may have missing or nonworking airbags is to run a CARFAX Vehicle History Report, which can tell you if the car has been in an accident. If it has, it may be a good idea to check to make sure the airbag system is in good working order.

Try to resist any pressure to act quickly when buying a used car ; this can sometimes be a sign that the seller wants to hide something. Taking the time to personally evaluate the vehicle, have it evaluated by professionals and look into the vehicle history could be invaluable, saving time and money while guiding you to the perfect car.

Mike Orsini is the head of blog marketing at CARFAX. Headquartered in Centreville, VA, CARFAX is the most trusted provider of vehicle history information that is used by millions of consumers each year. CARFAX Vehicle History Reports™ are available on all used cars and light trucks model year 1981 or later.



SOPL Home Page #locksmith, #security, #locksmith #organization, #locksmith #training, #locksmith #association, #locksmith #scams, #free #locksmith #training, #education, #locksmith #licensing, #locksmith #course, #become #a #locksmith, #sopl, #aloa, #associated #locksmiths #of #america


#

I got more out this site in one day, then I got from several years of memberships in other associations.

Lou Frazella
Rillito, AZ
***

This is exactly what the industry needs, a spark! It reminds me of revolutionary thinking, forward thinking, and just plain thinking!

Robert Wood
Moriarty, NM
***

You hit this one out of the ballpark!

Bill Neff, CPP, PSP, CML
Lancaster, PA
***

I feel the profession is better served by the Society of Professional Locksmiths.

Barry Campbell
Indianapolis, IN
***

I started the online classes! There is a lot of good learning material. Very complete.

Art Penna
Gardnerville, NV
***

As a past teacher in the public school system, I can honestly say that this entire program is fantastic! The printed course material is very professional and the online testing is exactly what is needed. I grade this program with an A+.

Nick Hart
Fort Lee, NJ
***

On line training is the future and from what I can see you are the first to really offer it in the locksmith industry to which I say my hat is off to you.

Ronald Smith CPL, CPS
La Fargeville, NY
***

Personally, I have trained overseas in a well known and highly respected training program, I have no hesitation in recommending the SOPL training program. The idea that others are now seeking to emulate some of what is being achieved by the this unique organization, serves to justify that the SOPL is, and has become the new yardstick

Danny Gurvis
St. Louis, MO
***

I actually learned something!

Fredrick Woelky
Ramsey, NJ
***

The SOPL is great! I appreciate the quick and helpful response times with my questions. This has saved me a lot of time and money!

Joseph Korczukowski
East Orange, NJ
***

I took the Key Blank Identification course today and I’m freakin’ jazzed! I learned so much! This freakin’ rocks! I love the training already and can’t wait to get time to do the next lesson!

Dave Bohnenstiehl
Collinsville, IL
***

After joining the SOPL I have received more referrals and made more money, than 3 other trade associations put together

Skip Locke
Mission Viejo, CA
***

We Cost Less Deliver More!

Our members receive more value for their membership dollars.
Click the audio player below to learn more.

Latest News Stories

United States Bureau of Internal Revenue Padlock – A U.S. Patent was issued to Thomas Slight on August 5, 1878 and produced by Slaymaker Lock Co. in Lancaster, PA until the early 1920’s. (read more )

SOPL launches new collectible antique padlock educational blog – Antique. collectibles, oddities and more are brought to you by leading expert and curator of the largest padlock collection on earth, Ronny Chase. (read more)

Locksmith Scammer Caught on Video! – Ethical Locksmith Saves Customer – Andrew McColley, of Andrews Lock and Key in Mesa Arizona put his foot down after being called by a consumer asking for advice. YouTube video goes viral. (read more )

Is ASSA ABLOY the Borg? – Confessions of a Video Marketer – Confessions of a video marketer on how to Crush the Competition for the underdog. The Borg neither innovates or creates, it consumes, adapts and assimilates others technology as their own. (read more )

Society of Professional Locksmiths Partners with Pro Compliance, Inc. Unifies Locksmith Industry – Something scammers cannot do is verify the physical location of a locksmith business and provide document inspections pertaining to its legitimacy. (read more )

Is the North Carolina Locksmith License Board Being Dismantled? Idiot or Genius? – On August 11, 2013 SOPL Director of Operations, Barry Campbell wrote a blog article titled ” Licensing Boards Under Fire from Federal Trade Commission – Restriction of Trade Violating Anti-Trust Laws”, was he right. (read more )

Should You Need the Government’s Permission to Work? – Institute for Justice national report exposes how widespread and costly occupational licensing has become while placing hurdle after hurdle in the way. (read more )

Reason Foundation – Locksmith Licensing Laws Are Destructive 3 Reasons for Removal – Applying “reason” and common sense in the analysis of occupational licensing. (read more )



Buying A Car Online? Beware Of Scams #car #bill #of #sale


#used car online
#

Buying a car online? Beware of scams

Highlights

  • Online car-buying scams are becoming more sophisticated and harder to detect.
  • The car is priced below value with some plausible story for the rock-bottom price.
  • If you are the victim of a scam, file a complaint at IC3.gov.

Used-car purchases often begin with an online advertisement, and, as a result, there are an increasing number of scams involved in online car buying that seek to dupe unsuspecting shoppers.

More On Car Buying:

“auto”

The scam typically starts with a used car that is being sold on a reputable website for automotive advertisements. The car is priced below value with some plausible story for the rock-bottom price, according to an IC3 consumer bulletin. Common reasons for the low price include the seller suddenly moving for work or for military deployment, or the seller needs cash quickly because of a job loss or unexpected medical bills.

Gaining the buyer’s confidence

The seller increases the buyer’s confidence in the deal by suggesting they use a third-party wire-transfer or escrow service for full or partial payment. To further increase the buyer’s comfort level, often the seller indicates that using this service to facilitate payment offers built-in buyer protection, according to the IC3 bulletin. Buyers believe this because they recognize the third party as a reputable automotive website, but the third party is not actually involved. The used-car buyer is instructed to fax or email his or her wire transfer receipt to the bogus seller to schedule delivery, only the delivery never occurs, and the buyer’s money is gone.

Reputable companies that have been used by criminals to pull off these online car-buying scams include AutoTrader.com, Cars.com, eBay Motors, Edmunds.com and Kelley Blue Book, according to IC3 data. These companies, except for eBay Motors, offer no buyer protection services, and eBay Motors’ Vehicle Purchase Protection service only protects buyers whose transactions begin and end on their website.

“A seller on a completely different site (than eBay Motors) will post a listing for a car that doesn’t actually exist,” says Jack Christin Jr. eBay’s associate general counsel. “The sellers lend credibility to their listing by falsely claiming the sale will be insured by eBay Motors Vehicle Purchase Protection, when in fact this protection only exists for sales that start and end on eBay. Finally, the buyer is enticed to wire money for the car through Western Union or a similar service.”

Similar online car-buying scams have been reported using the names of numerous reputable automotive websites, though car shoppers seem to get duped more often when eBay Motors is cited since it does offer buyer’s protection, albeit only for transactions conducted through eBay, according to an IC3 intelligence report.

Separating fact from fiction

Determining fact from fiction isn’t always easy with online car-buying scams since they are often quite elaborate. Often, the escrow services that the bogus seller suggests use variations on the reputable companies’ names. The scams also use website designs that look similar to the legitimate companies’ websites, sometimes even carrying the legitimate companies’ logos, according to the IC3 consumer bulletin.

Recently, the used-car scams have become even more sophisticated. “Scammers added 800 numbers and live chat with potential buyers to try to ease their concerns and provide more detailed information on the fraudulent buyer protection programs,” says Shayne Brown, associate general counsel for Kelley Blue Book.

Even with these scams, “buying a car is still generally a very safe practice, and the majority of transactions go off without a hitch,” says Phil Reed, senior consumer advice editor for the auto site Edmunds.com. Still, Reed advises that online car shoppers use caution when buying a car.

Start by looking for the warning signs that are common elements of a scam. Those include cars priced below market value as well as sellers who want to do business only online or try to shift the transaction from one website to another, according to IC3.

Do your due diligence

When it comes to escrow companies, Reed suggests that buyers do their due diligence if the seller has requested a specific escrow company. “Verify that the escrow company is properly licensed. Find its contact information on your own, not by following a link the seller sends, and call them and speak to a representative,” he says.

“Find the website through an Internet search engine and send them an email question. If you don’t receive a response, don’t do business with them. If the site displays logos from the Better Business Bureau, VerSign, TRUSTe or any similar organization, verify that they are really endorsed by these groups,” Reed says.

Other warning signs of an online car-buying scam include when the seller refuses to speak over the telephone, meet in person or allow the buyer to inspect the car ahead of time, according to IC3. For details on the warning signs read “5 red flags to bust a used car-buying scam” on the Bankrate site.

If you are the victim of a scam, file a complaint at IC3.gov, and if any reputable automotive websites are cited, contact them so their legal departments can add the case to their files.



Bad Credit Auto Loan Tips and Scams #renault #cars


#bad credit car loan
#

Bad Credit Auto Loans

Last Modified: September 09, 2015 by Jeff Ostroff | Originally Published April 24, 2006

  • Advice for people who need a bad credit auto loan
  • How to increase your chances of loan approval
  • How to get your credit report with score clean up your report
  • Where to get a bad credit car loan

If you have bad credit you should get your finances cleaned up before buying a car. Sometimes you can’t wait long enough for your score to improve. In this case, we will educate you on how to get the best deal possible given your situation.

Why Buyers with Bad Credit Get Taken Advantage Of By Lenders

  • You don’t know what financing options are available to you with your credit history
  • You are vulnerable to dealer tricks since you have limited options
  • Focusing on the monthly payment instead of the vehicle price

What to Expect from the Dealer When You Have Bad Credit

  • Extremely high interest rates
  • Lies about the lender requiring you to buy an extended warranty, credit life insurance, etc.
  • Lies about your credit report and score
  • Thinking you are desperate they are more likely to use common scams
  • Some loan providers require that you have had a previous auto loan

If you have bad credit, I bet many of the scams we describe have happened to you.

You can expect to pay a very high interest rate (much higher than you should have paid). The dealer may lie to you about the lender requiring you to buy extras. These extras may include an extended warranty or credit life insurance. Many times they lie to you about your credit score and tell you it’s lower than it really is.

If your credit score is too low to qualify for financing, this opens the door for a classic dealer trick! They require a co-signer for you to buy the car. However, they trick your co-signer into being the borrower with a little sleight of hand during the paper signing.

Since you have bad credit, the dealer thinks you are uneducated and will fall for all of their tricks. If they are correct, it could devastate your financial future. We will teach you what to look for and how to avoid getting ripped off. Protect yourself by reading the entire page.

Tips for People With Bad Credit

  • Watch out for 72 or 84 month loans – you will pay too much interest
  • Get your credit report and score so the dealer can’t lie to you
  • Use a bad credit lender like Auto Credit Express with a solid reputation
  • Don’t focus on a specific vehicle – you’re choices may be limited

If You Fail to Prepare, Prepare to Fail

You need to know the current state of your credit history (good or bad) before visiting the dealership, so you know the interest rate you should be paying. You can check your credit report and score online by visiting TransUnion or Experian.com (you get your 3 credit reports and 3 scores by Experian instantly online, with enrollment in Experian.com ).

If you have bad credit, you’ll never ever get the 0% financing that you see in ads. Applying for financing without knowing your credit score is one of the biggest mistake a car buyer can make. Click here to use our loan payment calculator tools to play on even ground with car dealers and verify their numbers to make sure they are not payment packing your loan.

Help Finding Bad Credit Auto Loans

If your Credit Score is 600 or you don’t have a past history of auto loans, don’t submit loan applications that get rejected, dropping your score even further. Apply to Auto Credit Express. they work with multiple lenders. They may be able to get you car financing from one of their high risk lenders, with decent online rates, even with a bankruptcy. If your score is 550, $1,500 or more in monthly income, full time employment, Auto Credit Express should be able to help you.

Avoid Financing Options and Extras into High APR Loans

Many people with bad credit make this mistake. If you know you are paying 18% APR, then forget about adding items like warranties and insurance into your loan. Why pay the high interest on those too? That just digs you a deeper hole. You can buy those things after the fact directly without the car dealer markups and high APR.

Use Caution When Trading in a Car with a Loan Balance

We hear from our visitors all the time who traded in a car they owed money on and a couple of months later were shocked to hear the dealer did not pay off their car loan in ten days as promised. With this scam, when the bank calls, you are responsible because the old car loan is in your name, and the dealer didn’t pay it off. If you trade in your car that you owe money on, make the dealer put in writing that they’ll pay off your car loan in ten days, or no deal.

Watch Out for These Scams

Straw Purchase Loan – When You Have a Co-signer!

With car buying, a straw purchase is when the dealer tells you that with your bad credit, you can’t qualify for the auto loan so you need a co-signer. The co-singer is duped by the dealer and the loan ends up in their name! This will not help restore your credit. To Avoid The Scam, have both signers at the dealership so both signatures will be done together.

Financing Fell Through

In this scam the dealer will call you several days after the deal is done and tell you that the financing fell through and you will need to pay a higher interest rate. Avoid this scam by not financing through the dealership whenever possible.

Click for More Details in our Top 10 Scams Section

How to Get Bad Credit Auto Loans

You can improve your chances of getting approved tremendously by raising your credit score. Unless you absolutely must by a car right now, take some time and try to pay down your balances as much as possible and try to get your score above 600. You may still be considered to have bad credit but will be much more likely to get approved. Once you have improved your situation save up some money to put at least 20% down on the car so you won’t be upside down. If you are, it sets you up for a common dealer scam in the future where they offer to pay off your current loan so that you can upgrade. The trick is that all they do is put your old loan amount into your next car’s monthly payment and you end up paying for two cars but you only own one.

  • Get your Credit Score so dealers can’t lie to you about your score.
  • Close old unused credit accounts. They drag down your credit score.
  • Remove erroneous previous addresses and other errors off your credit report
  • You should have greater than $1,500 monthly income, stable at least 6 months
  • Pay down your credit card balances as low as possible
  • Pay higher APR cards first before applying for auto loans

Be Flexible on Make and Model

Be prepared to compromise on the make and model of car that you will be able to purchase. If you have bad credit, the most important thing is to get financing. Sometimes the dealer can only get you approved on a limited selection of cars. Once you pay off this car and have made all your payments on time, it will help raise your credit score. When your score improves enough, the next time around, you will be able to get the car of your dreams.



Staged auto crashes #insurance #fraud, #schemes, #scams, #scam #alerts, #fraud #information


#

Staged auto crashes

Record blemished.

You have a costly claim on your insurance record. this could raise your auto premiums hundreds of dollars, or even mean your policy isn’t renewed.

Victims terrorized, killed.

Innocent drivers are terrorized, injured and even killed by these schemes. One entire family, including an infant daughter, died when their car was hit by a truck when a staged accident went wrong.

Life disrupted.

Your life is disrupted as you deal with the seemingly endless details of car repairs, claim settlement, police reports, lawyers, possible lawsuits and other problems.

Premiums rise.

Everyone’s auto premiums rise because insurance companies pass the costs of bogus claims onto honest policyholders.

Fight back

Honest citizens like you can fight back, protect yourself and put crooks like these behind bars.

At the accident

• Never tailgate. allow plenty of space between your car and the car ahead of you. This will give you ample time to stop if the lead car suddenly jams on its brakes.

• Look beyond the car in front of you while driving. Apply your brakes if you see traffic slowing.

• Count how many passengers were in the other car if you’re in a collision. Get their names, phone numbers and driver’s license. more people may file claims than were in the car. Also get the car’s license number. Note: Keep a pen and paper in your glove compartment so you’re always ready.

• How do the passengers behave? Did they stand around and joke, but suddenly act “injured” when the police arrived?

• Take cell-phone pictures of the other car, the damage it received and the passengers.

• Call the police to the scene. Get a police report with the officer’s name, even for minor damage. If the police report notes just a small dent or scratch, it’ll be harder for crooks to later claim serious injuries or car damage.

• Get involved if you’re a witness. Watch for the warning signs of a scam, and help the honest victim with details.

After the accident

• Contact your state insurance fraud bureau if a stranger tries to steer you to an unknown body shop, doctor, chiropractor or lawyer. Give officials the names, addresses and phone numbers of these providers.

• Only see medical and legal providers you know and trust, or at least ones that are recommended by people you trust. Never let yourself be suckered by a stranger off the streets.

• Keep careful records of your medical treatments. dates, treatments given, and diagnoses. Compare your records against the statements you receive to make sure the bill wasn’t padded or treatments outright fabricated.

• Check out your doctor or lawyer. Contact your state medical licensing board to ensure your doctor is licensed and has no complaints. Contact the American Bar Association to see if your lawyer has been disciplined for unethical behavior.

• Call the National Insurance Crime Bureau if you suspect a scam. The toll-free number is 1-800-835-6422 (24 hours a day, seven days a week). Give license plate number, location of the accident, people involved, why you think this was a fraud, and as many other details as possible.



Buying A Car Online? Beware Of Scams #suv #cars


#used car online
#

Buying a car online? Beware of scams

Highlights

  • Online car-buying scams are becoming more sophisticated and harder to detect.
  • The car is priced below value with some plausible story for the rock-bottom price.
  • If you are the victim of a scam, file a complaint at IC3.gov.

Used-car purchases often begin with an online advertisement, and, as a result, there are an increasing number of scams involved in online car buying that seek to dupe unsuspecting shoppers.

More On Car Buying:

“auto”

The scam typically starts with a used car that is being sold on a reputable website for automotive advertisements. The car is priced below value with some plausible story for the rock-bottom price, according to an IC3 consumer bulletin. Common reasons for the low price include the seller suddenly moving for work or for military deployment, or the seller needs cash quickly because of a job loss or unexpected medical bills.

Gaining the buyer’s confidence

The seller increases the buyer’s confidence in the deal by suggesting they use a third-party wire-transfer or escrow service for full or partial payment. To further increase the buyer’s comfort level, often the seller indicates that using this service to facilitate payment offers built-in buyer protection, according to the IC3 bulletin. Buyers believe this because they recognize the third party as a reputable automotive website, but the third party is not actually involved. The used-car buyer is instructed to fax or email his or her wire transfer receipt to the bogus seller to schedule delivery, only the delivery never occurs, and the buyer’s money is gone.

Reputable companies that have been used by criminals to pull off these online car-buying scams include AutoTrader.com, Cars.com, eBay Motors, Edmunds.com and Kelley Blue Book, according to IC3 data. These companies, except for eBay Motors, offer no buyer protection services, and eBay Motors’ Vehicle Purchase Protection service only protects buyers whose transactions begin and end on their website.

“A seller on a completely different site (than eBay Motors) will post a listing for a car that doesn’t actually exist,” says Jack Christin Jr. eBay’s associate general counsel. “The sellers lend credibility to their listing by falsely claiming the sale will be insured by eBay Motors Vehicle Purchase Protection, when in fact this protection only exists for sales that start and end on eBay. Finally, the buyer is enticed to wire money for the car through Western Union or a similar service.”

Similar online car-buying scams have been reported using the names of numerous reputable automotive websites, though car shoppers seem to get duped more often when eBay Motors is cited since it does offer buyer’s protection, albeit only for transactions conducted through eBay, according to an IC3 intelligence report.

Separating fact from fiction

Determining fact from fiction isn’t always easy with online car-buying scams since they are often quite elaborate. Often, the escrow services that the bogus seller suggests use variations on the reputable companies’ names. The scams also use website designs that look similar to the legitimate companies’ websites, sometimes even carrying the legitimate companies’ logos, according to the IC3 consumer bulletin.

Recently, the used-car scams have become even more sophisticated. “Scammers added 800 numbers and live chat with potential buyers to try to ease their concerns and provide more detailed information on the fraudulent buyer protection programs,” says Shayne Brown, associate general counsel for Kelley Blue Book.

Even with these scams, “buying a car is still generally a very safe practice, and the majority of transactions go off without a hitch,” says Phil Reed, senior consumer advice editor for the auto site Edmunds.com. Still, Reed advises that online car shoppers use caution when buying a car.

Start by looking for the warning signs that are common elements of a scam. Those include cars priced below market value as well as sellers who want to do business only online or try to shift the transaction from one website to another, according to IC3.

Do your due diligence

When it comes to escrow companies, Reed suggests that buyers do their due diligence if the seller has requested a specific escrow company. “Verify that the escrow company is properly licensed. Find its contact information on your own, not by following a link the seller sends, and call them and speak to a representative,” he says.

“Find the website through an Internet search engine and send them an email question. If you don’t receive a response, don’t do business with them. If the site displays logos from the Better Business Bureau, VerSign, TRUSTe or any similar organization, verify that they are really endorsed by these groups,” Reed says.

Other warning signs of an online car-buying scam include when the seller refuses to speak over the telephone, meet in person or allow the buyer to inspect the car ahead of time, according to IC3. For details on the warning signs read “5 red flags to bust a used car-buying scam” on the Bankrate site.

If you are the victim of a scam, file a complaint at IC3.gov, and if any reputable automotive websites are cited, contact them so their legal departments can add the case to their files.



Top 5 Used Car Buying Scams #value #of #a #car


#used car online
#

Top 5 Used Car Buying Scams

How can you avoid falling for car scams when buying a used car? Learn the facts.

CARFAX  shared information on the top five car scams to look out for when buying a used car :

Odometer Fraud:  Odometer fraud is the practice of rolling a car s mileage back, making it seem as though the vehicle has traveled fewer miles than it actually has. This is an illegal practice that violates federal law, but, nonetheless, odometer fraud is a prevalent car scam. It s hard to detect this type of fraud; a vehicle history report is one of the few ways you can tell if the odometer has been tampered with.

VIN Cloning:  Stolen vehicles are often sold with vehicle identification numbers (VINs) that have been swiped from legally registered cars. One way to avoid being a victim of this scam is to verify that all of the VINs on a vehicle match, including those on the dashboard, the driver’s side door sticker, the car’s frame and the paperwork for the vehicle.

Title Washing:  Used car values can drop dramatically if a car is deemed a salvage, and this is why some car sellers are tempted to rebuild a salvaged vehicle and sell it with a new title. A salvage title is issued on a vehicle damaged when the cost of repair exceeds 75 percent of its pre-damage value. (This damage threshold varies by state.) For this scam, sellers “wash” the title of a car by altering the title documents and moving the car to different states to get a clean title. When buying a used car, check for wording that indicates a salvage title, such as totaled, reconditioned, salvaged, junked, rebuilt or warranty returned. Also examine the title document to see if it has been physically altered.

Curbstoning:   State laws prohibit private citizens from selling multiple cars or vehicles, other than those titled to them, a practice called curbstoning. Frequently, curbstoners sell vehicles that reputable dealers won t touch, cars with hidden problems that can affect both the safety and the value of these vehicles. So give it some thought before engaging with a private party selling multiple vehicles.

Airbag Fraud:  Once they are deployed, airbags are sometimes not replaced correctly; and sometimes they aren’t replaced at all! There may be cases where airbags in a used vehicle you are considering are non-functional: they could be outdated, made of inappropriate materials or even could be non-existent (airbag covers can be replaced on the dashboard so that, from inside the vehicle, there is no indication that the airbag compartment is empty). The first step to finding out if a car may have missing or nonworking airbags is to run a CARFAX Vehicle History Report, which can tell you if the car has been in an accident. If it has, it may be a good idea to check to make sure the airbag system is in good working order.

Try to resist any pressure to act quickly when buying a used car ; this can sometimes be a sign that the seller wants to hide something. Taking the time to personally evaluate the vehicle, have it evaluated by professionals and look into the vehicle history could be invaluable, saving time and money while guiding you to the perfect car.

Mike Orsini is the head of blog marketing at CARFAX. Headquartered in Centreville, VA, CARFAX is the most trusted provider of vehicle history information that is used by millions of consumers each year. CARFAX Vehicle History Reports™ are available on all used cars and light trucks model year 1981 or later.



Buying A Car Online? Beware Of Scams #best #car #deals


#used car online
#

Buying a car online? Beware of scams

Highlights

  • Online car-buying scams are becoming more sophisticated and harder to detect.
  • The car is priced below value with some plausible story for the rock-bottom price.
  • If you are the victim of a scam, file a complaint at IC3.gov.

Used-car purchases often begin with an online advertisement, and, as a result, there are an increasing number of scams involved in online car buying that seek to dupe unsuspecting shoppers.

More On Car Buying:

“auto”

The scam typically starts with a used car that is being sold on a reputable website for automotive advertisements. The car is priced below value with some plausible story for the rock-bottom price, according to an IC3 consumer bulletin. Common reasons for the low price include the seller suddenly moving for work or for military deployment, or the seller needs cash quickly because of a job loss or unexpected medical bills.

Gaining the buyer’s confidence

The seller increases the buyer’s confidence in the deal by suggesting they use a third-party wire-transfer or escrow service for full or partial payment. To further increase the buyer’s comfort level, often the seller indicates that using this service to facilitate payment offers built-in buyer protection, according to the IC3 bulletin. Buyers believe this because they recognize the third party as a reputable automotive website, but the third party is not actually involved. The used-car buyer is instructed to fax or email his or her wire transfer receipt to the bogus seller to schedule delivery, only the delivery never occurs, and the buyer’s money is gone.

Reputable companies that have been used by criminals to pull off these online car-buying scams include AutoTrader.com, Cars.com, eBay Motors, Edmunds.com and Kelley Blue Book, according to IC3 data. These companies, except for eBay Motors, offer no buyer protection services, and eBay Motors’ Vehicle Purchase Protection service only protects buyers whose transactions begin and end on their website.

“A seller on a completely different site (than eBay Motors) will post a listing for a car that doesn’t actually exist,” says Jack Christin Jr. eBay’s associate general counsel. “The sellers lend credibility to their listing by falsely claiming the sale will be insured by eBay Motors Vehicle Purchase Protection, when in fact this protection only exists for sales that start and end on eBay. Finally, the buyer is enticed to wire money for the car through Western Union or a similar service.”

Similar online car-buying scams have been reported using the names of numerous reputable automotive websites, though car shoppers seem to get duped more often when eBay Motors is cited since it does offer buyer’s protection, albeit only for transactions conducted through eBay, according to an IC3 intelligence report.

Separating fact from fiction

Determining fact from fiction isn’t always easy with online car-buying scams since they are often quite elaborate. Often, the escrow services that the bogus seller suggests use variations on the reputable companies’ names. The scams also use website designs that look similar to the legitimate companies’ websites, sometimes even carrying the legitimate companies’ logos, according to the IC3 consumer bulletin.

Recently, the used-car scams have become even more sophisticated. “Scammers added 800 numbers and live chat with potential buyers to try to ease their concerns and provide more detailed information on the fraudulent buyer protection programs,” says Shayne Brown, associate general counsel for Kelley Blue Book.

Even with these scams, “buying a car is still generally a very safe practice, and the majority of transactions go off without a hitch,” says Phil Reed, senior consumer advice editor for the auto site Edmunds.com. Still, Reed advises that online car shoppers use caution when buying a car.

Start by looking for the warning signs that are common elements of a scam. Those include cars priced below market value as well as sellers who want to do business only online or try to shift the transaction from one website to another, according to IC3.

Do your due diligence

When it comes to escrow companies, Reed suggests that buyers do their due diligence if the seller has requested a specific escrow company. “Verify that the escrow company is properly licensed. Find its contact information on your own, not by following a link the seller sends, and call them and speak to a representative,” he says.

“Find the website through an Internet search engine and send them an email question. If you don’t receive a response, don’t do business with them. If the site displays logos from the Better Business Bureau, VerSign, TRUSTe or any similar organization, verify that they are really endorsed by these groups,” Reed says.

Other warning signs of an online car-buying scam include when the seller refuses to speak over the telephone, meet in person or allow the buyer to inspect the car ahead of time, according to IC3. For details on the warning signs read “5 red flags to bust a used car-buying scam” on the Bankrate site.

If you are the victim of a scam, file a complaint at IC3.gov, and if any reputable automotive websites are cited, contact them so their legal departments can add the case to their files.



Beware of Auto Warranty Scams #book #price #for #cars


#car warranties
#

Guide

  • Print
  • Email

Beware of Auto Warranty Scams

The FCC Consumer Center noticed an increase in complaints and inquiries from consumers who received calls about renewing their automobile warranties. During the calls, which are usually automated or pre-recorded, the consumer is told that the warranty on his or her automobile is about to expire and is instructed to press a number to renew it. The callers often pose as representatives of a car dealer or manufacturer, and may or may not have specific information about the consumer’s particular car and warranty.

Many of these calls may violate FCC Do-Not-Call rules. Many may actually be fraudulent—if you press a certain number or stay on the line, you may be asked to provide several types of personal information, including your credit card number, which can be used to defraud unwary consumers. The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) filed suit in federal court against companies suspected of making these calls. The FCC also investigates potential violations of FCC rules, and some states and telephone companies have sued companies that make these types of calls.

The FCC’s Rules

If you have placed your residential wired telephone number or your personal wireless phone number on the National Do-Not-Call list and you receive one of these calls, from anyone other than a business that sold you the car or repaired it, that call may violate the FCC’s Do-Not-Call rules. In addition, if you receive one of these calls on a wireless device, and the call is pre-recorded or placed using an autodialer, it may also violate the FCC’s rules unless you have given your prior consent to be called. Also, anyone making a telephone solicitation call to your home number must provide his or her name, the name of the person or entity on whose behalf the call is being made, and a telephone number or address at which that person or entity can be contacted. If the call is a pre-recorded message, it must include a contact telephone number. The call violates FCC rules, without these disclosures

If you have caller ID, a telemarketer is required to transmit or display its phone number and, if available, its name or the name and phone number of the company for which it is selling products. The display must include a phone number that you can call during regular business hours to ask that the company no longer call you. This rule applies even if you have a previously established business relationship with the company, and even if you have not registered your home phone number(s) on the national Do-Not-Call list.

For complete information on all the FCC’s rules regarding telephone solicitations, see our consumer guide about Unwanted Telephone Marketing Calls.

What to Do If You receive an Auto Warranty Call

First, do not provide any personal information, such as social security numbers, credit card information, driver’s license numbers, or bank account information to the caller. Telephone scammers are good at what they do and may imply that they work for a company you trust. Second, if you have certain information about the call or caller, you can file a complaint with the FCC. In some cases, the FCC can issue warning citations and impose fines against companies violating or suspected of violating the do-not-call rules, but the FCC does not award individual damages.

How to File a Complaint with the FCC

You must include your name, address, contact information and as much detail about your complaint as possible. To file a complaint, please visit www.fcc.gov/complaints. You can also file your complaint with the FCC’s Consumer Center by calling 1-888-CALL-FCC (1-888-225-5322) voice or 1-888-TELL-FCC (1-888-835-5322) for TTY; or writing to:

Federal Communications Commission

Federal Trade Commission



How to Lease a New Car and Avoid Dealer Scams #rent #a #car #for #cheap


#lease a car
#

How To Lease A New Car and Avoid Dealer Scams

Last Modified: December 04, 2015 by Jeff Ostroff | Originally Published July 28, 2000

  • What Car Leasing Means and How it Works
  • Biggest Complaints about Leasing
  • Should You Buy the Car at the End of the Term?
  • Advantages and Disadvantages of Car Leasing
  • How to Get Out of Your Lease via an Early Termination Without Penalties

What Car Leasing Means

You rent or lease the car for a period of time then give it back to the leasing company. Auto leasing is a way to drive a more expensive car than you can afford to buy and lets you change cars every few years without hassles or trading in. The dealer handles all the paperwork for the lease and you usually don’t talk to anyone at the leasing company at all.

The leasing company can be a bank, the car dealer, or the manufacturer. The selling price is often called Capitalized Value, or Gross Cap Cost. You can reduce your monthly lease payments by haggling a lower selling price and putting more money down upfront. Monthly lease payments are lower than car loan payments because you are paying for the 50% loss of the car’s value on a lease, but you pay off 100% when you buy. The downside is that at the end of the term you have no equity in the car. You’ve paid hundreds in useless fees such as dealer acquisition and disposition fees and now you have to do it all over again on your next lease. Had you bought the car you’ll have equity no matter how long you keep it.

The fact that your monthly payments are lower with a lease does not mean you are getting a better deal than buying!

Your Goals When Leasing

  • Get as low a capitalized value as possible
  • Get as high a residual value as possible (If not buying the car at the end)
  • Get as low a money factor as possible
  • Pay $0 down, $0 security deposit, $0 bank fees, $0 dealer fees

This guide will teach you how to fulfill as many of the goals as possible. Make sure to pay attention to all of the examples so you can get the best deal and avoid getting ripped off.



Beware of Auto Warranty Scams #cars #for #cheap


#car warranties
#

Guide

  • Print
  • Email

Beware of Auto Warranty Scams

The FCC Consumer Center noticed an increase in complaints and inquiries from consumers who received calls about renewing their automobile warranties. During the calls, which are usually automated or pre-recorded, the consumer is told that the warranty on his or her automobile is about to expire and is instructed to press a number to renew it. The callers often pose as representatives of a car dealer or manufacturer, and may or may not have specific information about the consumer’s particular car and warranty.

Many of these calls may violate FCC Do-Not-Call rules. Many may actually be fraudulent—if you press a certain number or stay on the line, you may be asked to provide several types of personal information, including your credit card number, which can be used to defraud unwary consumers. The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) filed suit in federal court against companies suspected of making these calls. The FCC also investigates potential violations of FCC rules, and some states and telephone companies have sued companies that make these types of calls.

The FCC’s Rules

If you have placed your residential wired telephone number or your personal wireless phone number on the National Do-Not-Call list and you receive one of these calls, from anyone other than a business that sold you the car or repaired it, that call may violate the FCC’s Do-Not-Call rules. In addition, if you receive one of these calls on a wireless device, and the call is pre-recorded or placed using an autodialer, it may also violate the FCC’s rules unless you have given your prior consent to be called. Also, anyone making a telephone solicitation call to your home number must provide his or her name, the name of the person or entity on whose behalf the call is being made, and a telephone number or address at which that person or entity can be contacted. If the call is a pre-recorded message, it must include a contact telephone number. The call violates FCC rules, without these disclosures

If you have caller ID, a telemarketer is required to transmit or display its phone number and, if available, its name or the name and phone number of the company for which it is selling products. The display must include a phone number that you can call during regular business hours to ask that the company no longer call you. This rule applies even if you have a previously established business relationship with the company, and even if you have not registered your home phone number(s) on the national Do-Not-Call list.

For complete information on all the FCC’s rules regarding telephone solicitations, see our consumer guide about Unwanted Telephone Marketing Calls.

What to Do If You receive an Auto Warranty Call

First, do not provide any personal information, such as social security numbers, credit card information, driver’s license numbers, or bank account information to the caller. Telephone scammers are good at what they do and may imply that they work for a company you trust. Second, if you have certain information about the call or caller, you can file a complaint with the FCC. In some cases, the FCC can issue warning citations and impose fines against companies violating or suspected of violating the do-not-call rules, but the FCC does not award individual damages.

How to File a Complaint with the FCC

You must include your name, address, contact information and as much detail about your complaint as possible. To file a complaint, please visit www.fcc.gov/complaints. You can also file your complaint with the FCC’s Consumer Center by calling 1-888-CALL-FCC (1-888-225-5322) voice or 1-888-TELL-FCC (1-888-835-5322) for TTY; or writing to:

Federal Communications Commission

Federal Trade Commission



Buy Cars Online: Scams to Avoid. #ex #motability #cars #for #sale


#buy cars online
#

Buy Cars Online: Scams to Avoid

Everyone loves a good deal, and online shopping can be a great way to do get one, but there are certain dangers to look out for when you buy cars online. Beware of ads that aren t as descriptive as they should be, the too good to be true car ad, and pay extra attention to any deals that involve shipping a car to you.

Some of these things are obvious, while others seem like they would be good deals, but one thing you should always look for is a fair description of the car or truck you are buying. A knowledgeable seller will make your experience miles better; it s better to deal with someone that tells you The head gasket needs to be replaced than it is to deal with someone that says That thin thing under the big metal thing in the hood. Try and find a car for sale by someone who knows what they re talking about.

Another bad sign when you re buying a car online is the ad that seems like everything is in order while they only want an insanely low asking price for their car. Remember: nobody would give away a Corvette with 10,000 miles on it for $600. Sometimes low-price ads are legit, but when calling on these, make sure to ask why the vehicle is priced so low. There s an old cliché that comes to mind in this situation: If it sounds too good to be true; it probably is.

The biggest car scams online are ones involving shipping vehicles, wire transfers and long-distances. Beware of any deals where someone asks you to wire them money before you receive the vehicle; this is a common avenue for online scammers. Speak to the seller one-on-one when you arrange terms of shipping and buying your new car. It could save you a lot of headaches (and money) later.

Buying a car online isn t all bad though. There are many deals that exist in many different forms all over the Internet. Just be sure to do your research, and shop with your mind, not your emotions.



Beware of Auto Warranty Scams #car #insurance #comparison #sites


#car warranties
#

Guide

  • Print
  • Email

Beware of Auto Warranty Scams

The FCC Consumer Center noticed an increase in complaints and inquiries from consumers who received calls about renewing their automobile warranties. During the calls, which are usually automated or pre-recorded, the consumer is told that the warranty on his or her automobile is about to expire and is instructed to press a number to renew it. The callers often pose as representatives of a car dealer or manufacturer, and may or may not have specific information about the consumer’s particular car and warranty.

Many of these calls may violate FCC Do-Not-Call rules. Many may actually be fraudulent—if you press a certain number or stay on the line, you may be asked to provide several types of personal information, including your credit card number, which can be used to defraud unwary consumers. The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) filed suit in federal court against companies suspected of making these calls. The FCC also investigates potential violations of FCC rules, and some states and telephone companies have sued companies that make these types of calls.

The FCC’s Rules

If you have placed your residential wired telephone number or your personal wireless phone number on the National Do-Not-Call list and you receive one of these calls, from anyone other than a business that sold you the car or repaired it, that call may violate the FCC’s Do-Not-Call rules. In addition, if you receive one of these calls on a wireless device, and the call is pre-recorded or placed using an autodialer, it may also violate the FCC’s rules unless you have given your prior consent to be called. Also, anyone making a telephone solicitation call to your home number must provide his or her name, the name of the person or entity on whose behalf the call is being made, and a telephone number or address at which that person or entity can be contacted. If the call is a pre-recorded message, it must include a contact telephone number. The call violates FCC rules, without these disclosures

If you have caller ID, a telemarketer is required to transmit or display its phone number and, if available, its name or the name and phone number of the company for which it is selling products. The display must include a phone number that you can call during regular business hours to ask that the company no longer call you. This rule applies even if you have a previously established business relationship with the company, and even if you have not registered your home phone number(s) on the national Do-Not-Call list.

For complete information on all the FCC’s rules regarding telephone solicitations, see our consumer guide about Unwanted Telephone Marketing Calls.

What to Do If You receive an Auto Warranty Call

First, do not provide any personal information, such as social security numbers, credit card information, driver’s license numbers, or bank account information to the caller. Telephone scammers are good at what they do and may imply that they work for a company you trust. Second, if you have certain information about the call or caller, you can file a complaint with the FCC. In some cases, the FCC can issue warning citations and impose fines against companies violating or suspected of violating the do-not-call rules, but the FCC does not award individual damages.

How to File a Complaint with the FCC

You must include your name, address, contact information and as much detail about your complaint as possible. To file a complaint, please visit www.fcc.gov/complaints. You can also file your complaint with the FCC’s Consumer Center by calling 1-888-CALL-FCC (1-888-225-5322) voice or 1-888-TELL-FCC (1-888-835-5322) for TTY; or writing to:

Federal Communications Commission

Federal Trade Commission



Buying A Car Online? Beware Of Scams #classic #car #insurance #online #quote


#used car online
#

Buying a car online? Beware of scams

Highlights

  • Online car-buying scams are becoming more sophisticated and harder to detect.
  • The car is priced below value with some plausible story for the rock-bottom price.
  • If you are the victim of a scam, file a complaint at IC3.gov.

Used-car purchases often begin with an online advertisement, and, as a result, there are an increasing number of scams involved in online car buying that seek to dupe unsuspecting shoppers.

More On Car Buying:

“auto”

The scam typically starts with a used car that is being sold on a reputable website for automotive advertisements. The car is priced below value with some plausible story for the rock-bottom price, according to an IC3 consumer bulletin. Common reasons for the low price include the seller suddenly moving for work or for military deployment, or the seller needs cash quickly because of a job loss or unexpected medical bills.

Gaining the buyer’s confidence

The seller increases the buyer’s confidence in the deal by suggesting they use a third-party wire-transfer or escrow service for full or partial payment. To further increase the buyer’s comfort level, often the seller indicates that using this service to facilitate payment offers built-in buyer protection, according to the IC3 bulletin. Buyers believe this because they recognize the third party as a reputable automotive website, but the third party is not actually involved. The used-car buyer is instructed to fax or email his or her wire transfer receipt to the bogus seller to schedule delivery, only the delivery never occurs, and the buyer’s money is gone.

Reputable companies that have been used by criminals to pull off these online car-buying scams include AutoTrader.com, Cars.com, eBay Motors, Edmunds.com and Kelley Blue Book, according to IC3 data. These companies, except for eBay Motors, offer no buyer protection services, and eBay Motors’ Vehicle Purchase Protection service only protects buyers whose transactions begin and end on their website.

“A seller on a completely different site (than eBay Motors) will post a listing for a car that doesn’t actually exist,” says Jack Christin Jr. eBay’s associate general counsel. “The sellers lend credibility to their listing by falsely claiming the sale will be insured by eBay Motors Vehicle Purchase Protection, when in fact this protection only exists for sales that start and end on eBay. Finally, the buyer is enticed to wire money for the car through Western Union or a similar service.”

Similar online car-buying scams have been reported using the names of numerous reputable automotive websites, though car shoppers seem to get duped more often when eBay Motors is cited since it does offer buyer’s protection, albeit only for transactions conducted through eBay, according to an IC3 intelligence report.

Separating fact from fiction

Determining fact from fiction isn’t always easy with online car-buying scams since they are often quite elaborate. Often, the escrow services that the bogus seller suggests use variations on the reputable companies’ names. The scams also use website designs that look similar to the legitimate companies’ websites, sometimes even carrying the legitimate companies’ logos, according to the IC3 consumer bulletin.

Recently, the used-car scams have become even more sophisticated. “Scammers added 800 numbers and live chat with potential buyers to try to ease their concerns and provide more detailed information on the fraudulent buyer protection programs,” says Shayne Brown, associate general counsel for Kelley Blue Book.

Even with these scams, “buying a car is still generally a very safe practice, and the majority of transactions go off without a hitch,” says Phil Reed, senior consumer advice editor for the auto site Edmunds.com. Still, Reed advises that online car shoppers use caution when buying a car.

Start by looking for the warning signs that are common elements of a scam. Those include cars priced below market value as well as sellers who want to do business only online or try to shift the transaction from one website to another, according to IC3.

Do your due diligence

When it comes to escrow companies, Reed suggests that buyers do their due diligence if the seller has requested a specific escrow company. “Verify that the escrow company is properly licensed. Find its contact information on your own, not by following a link the seller sends, and call them and speak to a representative,” he says.

“Find the website through an Internet search engine and send them an email question. If you don’t receive a response, don’t do business with them. If the site displays logos from the Better Business Bureau, VerSign, TRUSTe or any similar organization, verify that they are really endorsed by these groups,” Reed says.

Other warning signs of an online car-buying scam include when the seller refuses to speak over the telephone, meet in person or allow the buyer to inspect the car ahead of time, according to IC3. For details on the warning signs read “5 red flags to bust a used car-buying scam” on the Bankrate site.

If you are the victim of a scam, file a complaint at IC3.gov, and if any reputable automotive websites are cited, contact them so their legal departments can add the case to their files.



Car Donations: Beware Scams and Tax Pitfalls – CBS News #online #car #insurance #quotes


#donate your car
#

Car Donations: Beware Scams and Tax Pitfalls

Last Updated Jun 21, 2010 1:08 PM EDT

Donate your car to charity and get a tax break. That popular radio and TV pitch seems enticing. But as the recently-announced car-donation investigation by New York Attorney General Andrew Cuomo shows, you need to watch out before giving up your car for a write-off. Otherwise, you might get scammed and could face serious tax pitfalls.

Cuomo, who is running for New York Governor, sued to shut down the car-donation charity, Feed the Hungry Inc. (not affliated with Feed the Hungry Inc. in Leesburg, Va. which provides assistance to the Phillipines.) He said the charity’s director kept 98% of the funds for himself instead of spending it to feed the homeless.The charity has declined all comment through its lawyer.

If you want to donate your old car, take these steps to help ensure the proceeds go to good works and that you’ll get a bona fide tax deduction:

Checking Out a Charity

Make sure the charity is legitimate. Check the online version of IRS Publication 78 to see that the group is a registered charity eligible to take such donations. Only organizations listed as having 501 (c) (3) status can. Additionally, you can check with your state attorney general’s office, which keep files on charities in most states. Documents often are online.

Check how much goes to good works. Documents on file with the attorney general also should state what percentage of funds go to charitable work vs. running the charitable organization. Well-run charities typically spend 15% or less administering their program. You can also check the efficiency of the charitable organization with Charity Navigator .

Donate the car directly to the charity. Even legitimate charities may hire profit-making services to handle car-donation program. In such cases, these services get the majority of the money. So look for a charity that accepts the car directly.

Knowing The Write-off Rules

A few years back, the IRS became concerned that people were inflating the value of their auto donations. So a 2005 law made the rules tougher for deducting a car you donate. Here’s how to qualify for the tax break:

Make sure the title is signed over to the charity. Any transfer to a for-profit service, even if it’s working with the charity, could jeopardize your deduction.

Value your car correctly. Before the law changed, you could deduct the fair market value of your car calculated by a reputable service such as Kelley Blue Book. But now, if your car is worth more than $500, you generally can deduct only the amount the charity received when selling the car. You should get a statement from the charity showing the sales figure. If you don’t get the statement within a month of the sale, call the charity and insist on getting it.

There’s one exception to this valuation rule: When the charity decides to keep your car and use it–to deliver meals to the needy, for instance. Then, you can still deduct the fair market value from a valuation guide. But you’ll need a statement from the charity confirming that it used the vehicle and for what purpose. Attach it to your tax return. Whatever the valuation, you’ll need to file IRS form 8283 with your itemized return. The donation is considered a charitable deduction, but has its own form.

More from MoneyWatch



Buying a Used Car – Advice, Negotiation Tips and Avoiding Scams #used #hondas


#buy car
#

Buying a Used Car – Tips and Scams to Avoid

Last Modified: August 11, 2015 by Jeff Ostroff | Originally Published August 12, 2000

Buying a used car can be a tricky process to navigate because no two cars are the same. Each car has a unique history which can either work in your favor or become your biggest nightmare. In addition to the steps required to get a good deal on a new car, when buying a used vehicle there are additional steps you must be aware of.

One of the most important steps is to make sure to run a used car history report in addition to having a certified mechanic inspect the car on a lift. Why should you spend your hard earned money on a mechanic? It’s better to pay for a mechanic now than spend thousands on repairs later.

  • Follow our 6 easy steps to navigate buying a used car
  • Negotiate like a pro – Read how to negotiate with tough sellers!
  • Use our recommended tools and resources when buying a used car
  • Print our list of questions to ask the seller

You need to be very careful when buying a used car. You can easily end up with a lemon or rebuilt car. When you see a horrific wreck on the highway you probably don’t realize that many of those cars end up repaired, rebuilt and sold on the used car marked.

There are positives to buying used. Most importantly you will get more value for your dollar since somebody else took the huge hit on the initial depreciation. This hit is the largest source of lost money when buying a car. By following our used car buying guide you will learn how to avoid the common scams and pitfalls.

Six Step Roadmap to Buying a Used Car

1) Find the Right Used Car for You

This step may seem obvious but you shouldn’t just go out to used car dealerships and start the shopping process. First you should search the online used car classifieds. Go to the local newspaper websites to view the automotive classifieds to view ads for cars that are close to you. However, to get the largest selection we recommend that you use the larger sites with thousands of listings like the ones mentioned below.

Top Sites To Get Used Car Quotes

The main benefit of these sites is there are many more cars to choose from than your local newspaper. Try them all, they’re free to use.

CarClearanceDeals.com searches the huge inventory of vehicles from their network of dealers to get you the best discounted price. Use their simple form to select the make and model and instantly see what is available near you. You will be able to easily get quotes on several similar cars to give you negotiating power!

TrueCar has some unique features that make it a great place to search for a used car. First, they use their extensive data on completed sales to rate the price of each vehicle. This way, you will know if you are getting a good price. Most importantly, they have made deals with many dealers to give special discounts if you make contact using TrueCar. Vehicles with discounts are specified in the search results and the discount is disclosed after you make contact with the dealer (due to a bunch of legal red tape). You will see the same inventory that you see on other sites but with TrueCar you will get an additional discount.

Edmunds is one of the biggest names in the automotive industry. They have millions of used cars for sale in every make and model. Their simple to use site will make it easy to find the right car for you. Remember, its free and easy. Give it a try!

Cars.com is the place to search for your next car, truck or SUV with over 2.8 million used car listings. Compare used vehicles, locate certified pre-owned cars, quotes from used car dealers and private sellers. You can also sell your car fast at Cars.com. Place your online ad to reach millions of car buyers.



Beware of Auto Warranty Scams #auto #pawn


#auto warranties
#

Guide

  • Print
  • Email

Beware of Auto Warranty Scams

The FCC Consumer Center noticed an increase in complaints and inquiries from consumers who received calls about renewing their automobile warranties. During the calls, which are usually automated or pre-recorded, the consumer is told that the warranty on his or her automobile is about to expire and is instructed to press a number to renew it. The callers often pose as representatives of a car dealer or manufacturer, and may or may not have specific information about the consumer’s particular car and warranty.

Many of these calls may violate FCC Do-Not-Call rules. Many may actually be fraudulent—if you press a certain number or stay on the line, you may be asked to provide several types of personal information, including your credit card number, which can be used to defraud unwary consumers. The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) filed suit in federal court against companies suspected of making these calls. The FCC also investigates potential violations of FCC rules, and some states and telephone companies have sued companies that make these types of calls.

The FCC’s Rules

If you have placed your residential wired telephone number or your personal wireless phone number on the National Do-Not-Call list and you receive one of these calls, from anyone other than a business that sold you the car or repaired it, that call may violate the FCC’s Do-Not-Call rules. In addition, if you receive one of these calls on a wireless device, and the call is pre-recorded or placed using an autodialer, it may also violate the FCC’s rules unless you have given your prior consent to be called. Also, anyone making a telephone solicitation call to your home number must provide his or her name, the name of the person or entity on whose behalf the call is being made, and a telephone number or address at which that person or entity can be contacted. If the call is a pre-recorded message, it must include a contact telephone number. The call violates FCC rules, without these disclosures

If you have caller ID, a telemarketer is required to transmit or display its phone number and, if available, its name or the name and phone number of the company for which it is selling products. The display must include a phone number that you can call during regular business hours to ask that the company no longer call you. This rule applies even if you have a previously established business relationship with the company, and even if you have not registered your home phone number(s) on the national Do-Not-Call list.

For complete information on all the FCC’s rules regarding telephone solicitations, see our consumer guide about Unwanted Telephone Marketing Calls.

What to Do If You receive an Auto Warranty Call

First, do not provide any personal information, such as social security numbers, credit card information, driver’s license numbers, or bank account information to the caller. Telephone scammers are good at what they do and may imply that they work for a company you trust. Second, if you have certain information about the call or caller, you can file a complaint with the FCC. In some cases, the FCC can issue warning citations and impose fines against companies violating or suspected of violating the do-not-call rules, but the FCC does not award individual damages.

How to File a Complaint with the FCC

You must include your name, address, contact information and as much detail about your complaint as possible. To file a complaint, please visit www.fcc.gov/complaints. You can also file your complaint with the FCC’s Consumer Center by calling 1-888-CALL-FCC (1-888-225-5322) voice or 1-888-TELL-FCC (1-888-835-5322) for TTY; or writing to:

Federal Communications Commission

Federal Trade Commission



Bad Credit Auto Loan Tips and Scams #bad #credit #auto #financing


#online auto loans
#

Bad Credit Auto Loans

Last Modified: September 09, 2015 by Jeff Ostroff | Originally Published April 24, 2006

  • Advice for people who need a bad credit auto loan
  • How to increase your chances of loan approval
  • How to get your credit report with score clean up your report
  • Where to get a bad credit car loan

If you have bad credit you should get your finances cleaned up before buying a car. Sometimes you can’t wait long enough for your score to improve. In this case, we will educate you on how to get the best deal possible given your situation.

Why Buyers with Bad Credit Get Taken Advantage Of By Lenders

  • You don’t know what financing options are available to you with your credit history
  • You are vulnerable to dealer tricks since you have limited options
  • Focusing on the monthly payment instead of the vehicle price

What to Expect from the Dealer When You Have Bad Credit

  • Extremely high interest rates
  • Lies about the lender requiring you to buy an extended warranty, credit life insurance, etc.
  • Lies about your credit report and score
  • Thinking you are desperate they are more likely to use common scams
  • Some loan providers require that you have had a previous auto loan

If you have bad credit, I bet many of the scams we describe have happened to you.

You can expect to pay a very high interest rate (much higher than you should have paid). The dealer may lie to you about the lender requiring you to buy extras. These extras may include an extended warranty or credit life insurance. Many times they lie to you about your credit score and tell you it’s lower than it really is.

If your credit score is too low to qualify for financing, this opens the door for a classic dealer trick! They require a co-signer for you to buy the car. However, they trick your co-signer into being the borrower with a little sleight of hand during the paper signing.

Since you have bad credit, the dealer thinks you are uneducated and will fall for all of their tricks. If they are correct, it could devastate your financial future. We will teach you what to look for and how to avoid getting ripped off. Protect yourself by reading the entire page.

Tips for People With Bad Credit

  • Watch out for 72 or 84 month loans – you will pay too much interest
  • Get your credit report and score so the dealer can’t lie to you
  • Use a bad credit lender like Auto Credit Express with a solid reputation
  • Don’t focus on a specific vehicle – you’re choices may be limited

If You Fail to Prepare, Prepare to Fail

You need to know the current state of your credit history (good or bad) before visiting the dealership, so you know the interest rate you should be paying. You can check your credit report and score online by visiting TransUnion or Experian.com (you get your 3 credit reports and 3 scores by Experian instantly online, with enrollment in Experian.com ).

If you have bad credit, you’ll never ever get the 0% financing that you see in ads. Applying for financing without knowing your credit score is one of the biggest mistake a car buyer can make. Click here to use our loan payment calculator tools to play on even ground with car dealers and verify their numbers to make sure they are not payment packing your loan.

Help Finding Bad Credit Auto Loans

If your Credit Score is 600 or you don’t have a past history of auto loans, don’t submit loan applications that get rejected, dropping your score even further. Apply to Auto Credit Express. they work with multiple lenders. They may be able to get you car financing from one of their high risk lenders, with decent online rates, even with a bankruptcy. If your score is 550, $1,500 or more in monthly income, full time employment, Auto Credit Express should be able to help you.

Avoid Financing Options and Extras into High APR Loans

Many people with bad credit make this mistake. If you know you are paying 18% APR, then forget about adding items like warranties and insurance into your loan. Why pay the high interest on those too? That just digs you a deeper hole. You can buy those things after the fact directly without the car dealer markups and high APR.

Use Caution When Trading in a Car with a Loan Balance

We hear from our visitors all the time who traded in a car they owed money on and a couple of months later were shocked to hear the dealer did not pay off their car loan in ten days as promised. With this scam, when the bank calls, you are responsible because the old car loan is in your name, and the dealer didn’t pay it off. If you trade in your car that you owe money on, make the dealer put in writing that they’ll pay off your car loan in ten days, or no deal.

Watch Out for These Scams

Straw Purchase Loan – When You Have a Co-signer!

With car buying, a straw purchase is when the dealer tells you that with your bad credit, you can’t qualify for the auto loan so you need a co-signer. The co-singer is duped by the dealer and the loan ends up in their name! This will not help restore your credit. To Avoid The Scam, have both signers at the dealership so both signatures will be done together.

Financing Fell Through

In this scam the dealer will call you several days after the deal is done and tell you that the financing fell through and you will need to pay a higher interest rate. Avoid this scam by not financing through the dealership whenever possible.

Click for More Details in our Top 10 Scams Section

How to Get Bad Credit Auto Loans

You can improve your chances of getting approved tremendously by raising your credit score. Unless you absolutely must by a car right now, take some time and try to pay down your balances as much as possible and try to get your score above 600. You may still be considered to have bad credit but will be much more likely to get approved. Once you have improved your situation save up some money to put at least 20% down on the car so you won’t be upside down. If you are, it sets you up for a common dealer scam in the future where they offer to pay off your current loan so that you can upgrade. The trick is that all they do is put your old loan amount into your next car’s monthly payment and you end up paying for two cars but you only own one.

  • Get your Credit Score so dealers can’t lie to you about your score.
  • Close old unused credit accounts. They drag down your credit score.
  • Remove erroneous previous addresses and other errors off your credit report
  • You should have greater than $1,500 monthly income, stable at least 6 months
  • Pay down your credit card balances as low as possible
  • Pay higher APR cards first before applying for auto loans

Be Flexible on Make and Model

Be prepared to compromise on the make and model of car that you will be able to purchase. If you have bad credit, the most important thing is to get financing. Sometimes the dealer can only get you approved on a limited selection of cars. Once you pay off this car and have made all your payments on time, it will help raise your credit score. When your score improves enough, the next time around, you will be able to get the car of your dreams.



How to finance a used car and avoid scams #best #car #deals


#online used cars
#

Used Car Loan Tips

Last Modified: April 23, 2015 by Jeff Ostroff | Originally Published March 8, 2005

A used car loan is a little bit different than financing a new car.

  • Most lenders will not lend you money for a used car that is more than 4 or 5 years old
  • Lenders charge at least 2% higher APR than they do for new car loans
  • Online lenders have a lower premium on used car loans
  • Private party and dealer transactions are handled differently
  • In some cases you may be forced into dealer financing

Never Pay Cash for a Deposit on a Car

You may be wondering why I put this advice so high on the page. I think it’s very important to alert you about this since most people don’t ever think about it. If the deal goes south, you’ll never get your cash back, but you can always dispute a credit card transaction. Most dealers are reasonable, but you don’t want to risk putting yourself in this position. Why take the risk when it is so easy to avoid?

There are two different types of used transactions. The first is when buying from a dealer. The other is when you purchase from a private party. Depending on which route you take, there are different financing options available. Some lenders will not finance a private party transaction.

If You Plan to Purchase From a Dealer

It is easier to get a used car loan if you are buying from a dealer. It doesn’t matter if it is a dedicated used car dealership or a dealer that has a used car department. Banks see less risk in this type of lending. Therefore, you will have more options when financing a used car. The online lenders we recommend below will generally beat the dealer’s rates.

If You Plan to Purchase From a Private Party

Lenders see more risk when you buy from private party. Buying from a private party will usually get you a better price, but it will be much more difficult to get a used car loan. In addition you will be paying a higher interest rate. LightStream (a division of SunTrust bank) is one of the few online lenders that provides used car loans when buying from a private party.

Which site should you use? First make sure your credit score is at least 680, then as a prime borrower, you can choose by who has the lowest APR. People with bad credit pay higher interest rates. Get your credit report instantly online, it’s a must for The Folder. DO NOT apply for a car loan until you get your credit report with credit score. Get it online at one of the big three bureaus. If your credit score is less than 680 Auto Credit Express may be your best option.

Credit Bureaus:

  • Experian.com – Owned by the Experian credit bureau.
    • You get your 3 credit reports
    • 3 scores by Experian instantly online
    • With enrollment in Experian.com
  • TransUnion – One of the big three credit bureaus.

Best Used Loan Sites

Up2Drive (a division of BMW Bank of North America) offers highly competitive rates and superior customer service.

  • Up2Drive financing is not available to first time car buyers.
  • Once approved, Up2Drive will send you a Drive Check .
  • The Drive Check works similar to a personal check and can be used for Refinance or Dealer New/Used car purchases.
  • You can negotiate the sale price of a vehicle as if you have cash on hand.
  • Check today’s online auto loan rates
  • Lock your rate for 30 days.
  • Never an application fee.

LightStream is the online lending division of SunTrust Banks Inc. They offer low interest, unsecured loans for highly qualified customers. LightStream offers “The AnythingLoan” which can be used to finance new or used, private party or dealer, they have you covered!

  • LightStream delivers a revolutionary loan process
  • Low interest rate unsecured loans for highly qualified customers

– Minimum FICO credit score of 700 required to qualify

– A substantial, excellent credit history is a must

  • LightStream offers their unique “Customer Experience Guarantee”
  • Receive funds as soon as the same day of your application on banking business days
  • LightStream loans can be used for new or used cars, private party or dealer
  • LightStream does not charge any fees of any kind!
  • Auto Credit Express is designed for people with poor credit. Auto Credit Express requires you to have a monthly income of $1,500.00 or more and be able to obtain auto insurance.

    Auto financing for people with lesser credit: If your Credit Score is below 650 and you’re rejected, don’t submit apps that keep getting you rejected. Submit one free application to a bad credit auto loan site like Auto Credit Express.

    • They can find financing from high risk underwriters. Even if you have a discharged bankruptcy, tax liens or bad credit.
    • If your credit score is 550 or above, your chances are good, also you should full time employment.
    • If you have good credit but get rejected elsewhere for no car loan history.

    Additional Tips

    Make sure you know the car’s history

    Before you even think about financing a used car, you need to run an AutoCheck Report and have a certified mechanic inspect the car. If you don’t do both of these, and you end up getting screwed, don’t email me. You have been warned. Learn more in our Vehicle History Report article .

    Get An Extended Warranty for your used Car



    Top 5 Used Car Buying Scams #car #value


    #used car online
    #

    Top 5 Used Car Buying Scams

    How can you avoid falling for car scams when buying a used car? Learn the facts.

    CARFAX  shared information on the top five car scams to look out for when buying a used car :

    Odometer Fraud:  Odometer fraud is the practice of rolling a car s mileage back, making it seem as though the vehicle has traveled fewer miles than it actually has. This is an illegal practice that violates federal law, but, nonetheless, odometer fraud is a prevalent car scam. It s hard to detect this type of fraud; a vehicle history report is one of the few ways you can tell if the odometer has been tampered with.

    VIN Cloning:  Stolen vehicles are often sold with vehicle identification numbers (VINs) that have been swiped from legally registered cars. One way to avoid being a victim of this scam is to verify that all of the VINs on a vehicle match, including those on the dashboard, the driver’s side door sticker, the car’s frame and the paperwork for the vehicle.

    Title Washing:  Used car values can drop dramatically if a car is deemed a salvage, and this is why some car sellers are tempted to rebuild a salvaged vehicle and sell it with a new title. A salvage title is issued on a vehicle damaged when the cost of repair exceeds 75 percent of its pre-damage value. (This damage threshold varies by state.) For this scam, sellers “wash” the title of a car by altering the title documents and moving the car to different states to get a clean title. When buying a used car, check for wording that indicates a salvage title, such as totaled, reconditioned, salvaged, junked, rebuilt or warranty returned. Also examine the title document to see if it has been physically altered.

    Curbstoning:   State laws prohibit private citizens from selling multiple cars or vehicles, other than those titled to them, a practice called curbstoning. Frequently, curbstoners sell vehicles that reputable dealers won t touch, cars with hidden problems that can affect both the safety and the value of these vehicles. So give it some thought before engaging with a private party selling multiple vehicles.

    Airbag Fraud:  Once they are deployed, airbags are sometimes not replaced correctly; and sometimes they aren’t replaced at all! There may be cases where airbags in a used vehicle you are considering are non-functional: they could be outdated, made of inappropriate materials or even could be non-existent (airbag covers can be replaced on the dashboard so that, from inside the vehicle, there is no indication that the airbag compartment is empty). The first step to finding out if a car may have missing or nonworking airbags is to run a CARFAX Vehicle History Report, which can tell you if the car has been in an accident. If it has, it may be a good idea to check to make sure the airbag system is in good working order.

    Try to resist any pressure to act quickly when buying a used car ; this can sometimes be a sign that the seller wants to hide something. Taking the time to personally evaluate the vehicle, have it evaluated by professionals and look into the vehicle history could be invaluable, saving time and money while guiding you to the perfect car.

    Mike Orsini is the head of blog marketing at CARFAX. Headquartered in Centreville, VA, CARFAX is the most trusted provider of vehicle history information that is used by millions of consumers each year. CARFAX Vehicle History Reports™ are available on all used cars and light trucks model year 1981 or later.



    Buying A Car Online? Beware Of Scams #car #insurance #australia


    #used car online
    #

    Buying a car online? Beware of scams

    Highlights

    • Online car-buying scams are becoming more sophisticated and harder to detect.
    • The car is priced below value with some plausible story for the rock-bottom price.
    • If you are the victim of a scam, file a complaint at IC3.gov.

    Used-car purchases often begin with an online advertisement, and, as a result, there are an increasing number of scams involved in online car buying that seek to dupe unsuspecting shoppers.

    More On Car Buying:

    “auto”

    The scam typically starts with a used car that is being sold on a reputable website for automotive advertisements. The car is priced below value with some plausible story for the rock-bottom price, according to an IC3 consumer bulletin. Common reasons for the low price include the seller suddenly moving for work or for military deployment, or the seller needs cash quickly because of a job loss or unexpected medical bills.

    Gaining the buyer’s confidence

    The seller increases the buyer’s confidence in the deal by suggesting they use a third-party wire-transfer or escrow service for full or partial payment. To further increase the buyer’s comfort level, often the seller indicates that using this service to facilitate payment offers built-in buyer protection, according to the IC3 bulletin. Buyers believe this because they recognize the third party as a reputable automotive website, but the third party is not actually involved. The used-car buyer is instructed to fax or email his or her wire transfer receipt to the bogus seller to schedule delivery, only the delivery never occurs, and the buyer’s money is gone.

    Reputable companies that have been used by criminals to pull off these online car-buying scams include AutoTrader.com, Cars.com, eBay Motors, Edmunds.com and Kelley Blue Book, according to IC3 data. These companies, except for eBay Motors, offer no buyer protection services, and eBay Motors’ Vehicle Purchase Protection service only protects buyers whose transactions begin and end on their website.

    “A seller on a completely different site (than eBay Motors) will post a listing for a car that doesn’t actually exist,” says Jack Christin Jr. eBay’s associate general counsel. “The sellers lend credibility to their listing by falsely claiming the sale will be insured by eBay Motors Vehicle Purchase Protection, when in fact this protection only exists for sales that start and end on eBay. Finally, the buyer is enticed to wire money for the car through Western Union or a similar service.”

    Similar online car-buying scams have been reported using the names of numerous reputable automotive websites, though car shoppers seem to get duped more often when eBay Motors is cited since it does offer buyer’s protection, albeit only for transactions conducted through eBay, according to an IC3 intelligence report.

    Separating fact from fiction

    Determining fact from fiction isn’t always easy with online car-buying scams since they are often quite elaborate. Often, the escrow services that the bogus seller suggests use variations on the reputable companies’ names. The scams also use website designs that look similar to the legitimate companies’ websites, sometimes even carrying the legitimate companies’ logos, according to the IC3 consumer bulletin.

    Recently, the used-car scams have become even more sophisticated. “Scammers added 800 numbers and live chat with potential buyers to try to ease their concerns and provide more detailed information on the fraudulent buyer protection programs,” says Shayne Brown, associate general counsel for Kelley Blue Book.

    Even with these scams, “buying a car is still generally a very safe practice, and the majority of transactions go off without a hitch,” says Phil Reed, senior consumer advice editor for the auto site Edmunds.com. Still, Reed advises that online car shoppers use caution when buying a car.

    Start by looking for the warning signs that are common elements of a scam. Those include cars priced below market value as well as sellers who want to do business only online or try to shift the transaction from one website to another, according to IC3.

    Do your due diligence

    When it comes to escrow companies, Reed suggests that buyers do their due diligence if the seller has requested a specific escrow company. “Verify that the escrow company is properly licensed. Find its contact information on your own, not by following a link the seller sends, and call them and speak to a representative,” he says.

    “Find the website through an Internet search engine and send them an email question. If you don’t receive a response, don’t do business with them. If the site displays logos from the Better Business Bureau, VerSign, TRUSTe or any similar organization, verify that they are really endorsed by these groups,” Reed says.

    Other warning signs of an online car-buying scam include when the seller refuses to speak over the telephone, meet in person or allow the buyer to inspect the car ahead of time, according to IC3. For details on the warning signs read “5 red flags to bust a used car-buying scam” on the Bankrate site.

    If you are the victim of a scam, file a complaint at IC3.gov, and if any reputable automotive websites are cited, contact them so their legal departments can add the case to their files.



    How to Lease a New Car and Avoid Dealer Scams #used #car #price #guide


    #lease a car
    #

    How To Lease A New Car and Avoid Dealer Scams

    Last Modified: December 04, 2015 by Jeff Ostroff | Originally Published July 28, 2000

    • What Car Leasing Means and How it Works
    • Biggest Complaints about Leasing
    • Should You Buy the Car at the End of the Term?
    • Advantages and Disadvantages of Car Leasing
    • How to Get Out of Your Lease via an Early Termination Without Penalties

    What Car Leasing Means

    You rent or lease the car for a period of time then give it back to the leasing company. Auto leasing is a way to drive a more expensive car than you can afford to buy and lets you change cars every few years without hassles or trading in. The dealer handles all the paperwork for the lease and you usually don’t talk to anyone at the leasing company at all.

    The leasing company can be a bank, the car dealer, or the manufacturer. The selling price is often called Capitalized Value, or Gross Cap Cost. You can reduce your monthly lease payments by haggling a lower selling price and putting more money down upfront. Monthly lease payments are lower than car loan payments because you are paying for the 50% loss of the car’s value on a lease, but you pay off 100% when you buy. The downside is that at the end of the term you have no equity in the car. You’ve paid hundreds in useless fees such as dealer acquisition and disposition fees and now you have to do it all over again on your next lease. Had you bought the car you’ll have equity no matter how long you keep it.

    The fact that your monthly payments are lower with a lease does not mean you are getting a better deal than buying!

    Your Goals When Leasing

    • Get as low a capitalized value as possible
    • Get as high a residual value as possible (If not buying the car at the end)
    • Get as low a money factor as possible
    • Pay $0 down, $0 security deposit, $0 bank fees, $0 dealer fees

    This guide will teach you how to fulfill as many of the goals as possible. Make sure to pay attention to all of the examples so you can get the best deal and avoid getting ripped off.



    Buy Cars Online: Scams to Avoid.


    #buy cars online
    #

    Buy Cars Online: Scams to Avoid

    Everyone loves a good deal, and online shopping can be a great way to do get one, but there are certain dangers to look out for when you buy cars online. Beware of ads that aren t as descriptive as they should be, the too good to be true car ad, and pay extra attention to any deals that involve shipping a car to you.

    Some of these things are obvious, while others seem like they would be good deals, but one thing you should always look for is a fair description of the car or truck you are buying. A knowledgeable seller will make your experience miles better; it s better to deal with someone that tells you The head gasket needs to be replaced than it is to deal with someone that says That thin thing under the big metal thing in the hood. Try and find a car for sale by someone who knows what they re talking about.

    Another bad sign when you re buying a car online is the ad that seems like everything is in order while they only want an insanely low asking price for their car. Remember: nobody would give away a Corvette with 10,000 miles on it for $600. Sometimes low-price ads are legit, but when calling on these, make sure to ask why the vehicle is priced so low. There s an old cliché that comes to mind in this situation: If it sounds too good to be true; it probably is.

    The biggest car scams online are ones involving shipping vehicles, wire transfers and long-distances. Beware of any deals where someone asks you to wire them money before you receive the vehicle; this is a common avenue for online scammers. Speak to the seller one-on-one when you arrange terms of shipping and buying your new car. It could save you a lot of headaches (and money) later.

    Buying a car online isn t all bad though. There are many deals that exist in many different forms all over the Internet. Just be sure to do your research, and shop with your mind, not your emotions.