Six New Plug-In Electric Cars Coming For 2014 #truck #for #sale


#electric cars
#

Six New Plug-In Electric Cars Coming For 2014

BMW i3 Coupe concept

This is an exciting time for electric car enthusiasts. From just a handful of choices only a few years ago, buyers in some states now have access to as many as a dozen different plug-in vehicles.

It’s set to get even better–over the course of the next few years, another six electric vehicles are on the way. Here’s our full run-down of the most important plug-in vehicles debuting over the next year.

The 2014 BMW i3 electric car isn’t just important, it’s exciting too–and it’s nice to be able to say that about a new electric car.

BMW has explored electric vehicles before with thorough testing programs–significantly, the MINI E and BMW ActiveE electric vehicles–and that knowledge is helping develop the i3, a compact car based on a dedicated platform. A range-extended model will also be available, to quell those with range anxiety.

It’s high-tech too, with a carbon-fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) unibody, and the i3’s minimalist innards are trimmed in sustainable materials. It’s all very futuristic, yet as tasteful and considered as any internally-combusting BMW.

And if the i3 isn’t exciting enough, the i8 plug-in hybrid sports car will arrive shortly after.

2014 Cadillac ELR

Back when Chevy launched the Volt range-extended electric car, it promised the Voltec powertrain would appear in other vehicles.

Well, this is the first “other vehicle” it’s appearing in–the 2014 Cadillac ELR. Behind the sharp-suited Cadillac styling is a thoroughly modern drivetrain, utilizing the same 1.4-liter gasoline engine as the Volt, and a similar electric drivetrain.

We say “similar” because to suit the Caddy’s upmarket status, ELR drivers do get a little more power and torque than their Volt counterparts. They also get two fewer doors, turning the ELR into a sleek and distinctive coupe. Electric range stays the same though, at around 35 miles. Deliveries should begin early 2014.

2014 Chevrolet Spark EV

2014 Chevrolet Spark EV

Initially, we suspected the Chevy Spark EV to be one of the small but growing range of “compliance cars”–electric vehicles designed and built solely to meet California’s requirements for electric vehicle sales.

Thankfully, that isn’t the case–Chevrolet is actually rather serious about the Spark EV, and as well as making it available beyond just west coast markets, they’ve thoroughly re-engineered the gasoline Spark for its new electric powertrain.

The styling differences are subtle–some blue paint here, a Volt-style grille there–but under the skin it’s a real wolf in sheep’s clothing. A 110 kW (130 horsepower) electric motor gives it far more shove than the gasoline model, and its 400 pounds-feet torque output matches that of a Ferrari 458 Italia supercar.

The Spark EV will go on sale in several U.S. markets, as well as Canada, South Korea and Europe. U.S. pricing starts at under $32,500, pre-incentives.


Plug-in Hybrids #car #comparisons #side #by #side


#best hybrid cars
#

Plug-in Hybrids

Plug-in hybrids, sometimes called Plug-in Hybrid-Electric Vehicles (PHEVs), are hybrids with high-capacity batteries that can be charged by plugging them into an electrical outlet or charging station. They can store enough electricity from the power grid to significantly reduce their petroleum consumption under typical driving conditions.

Different Kinds of Plug-in Hybrids

There are two basic plug-in hybrid configurations:

Series plug-in hybrids. also called Extended Range Electric Vehicles (EREVs). Only the electric motor turns the wheels; the gasoline engine is only used to generate electricity. Series plug-ins can run solely on electricity until the battery needs to be recharged. The gasoline engine then generates electricity to power the electric motor. For shorter trips, these vehicles might use no gasoline at all.

Parallel or Blended Plug-in Hybrids. Both the engine and electric motor are mechanically connected to the wheels, and both propel the vehicle under most driving conditions. Electric-only operation usually occurs only at low speeds.

Plug-in hybrids also have different battery capacities, allowing some to travel farther on electricity than others. Their fuel economy, like that of electric vehicles and regular hybrids, can be sensitive to driving style, driving conditions, and accessory use.

Benefits and Challenges

Less Petroleum Use. Plug-in hybrids use roughly 30% to 60% less petroleum than conventional vehicles. Since electricity is produced mostly from domestic resources, plug-in hybrids reduce oil dependence.

Less Greenhouse Gas Emissions. Plug-in hybrids typically emit less greenhouse gas than conventional vehicles, but the amount generated depends partly on the fuel used at electrical power plants nuclear and hydroelectric plants are cleaner than coal-fired power plants.

Higher Vehicle Costs, Lower Fuel Costs. A plug-in hybrid can cost roughly $4 to $8 thousand more than a comparable non-plug-in hybrid. Using electricity is usually cheaper than using gasoline sometimes much cheaper but whether fuel savings will offset the higher vehicle cost depends on the vehicle purchased, the percentage of miles operating on electricity, fuel costs, and ownership length. Federal tax incentives up to $7,500 are currently available for qualifying plug-ins.

Re-charging Takes Time. Re-charging the battery using a 120-volt household outlet can take several hours; re-charging using a 240-volt home or public charger can take roughly 1 to 4 hours; while a fast charge to 80% capacity may take as little as 30 minutes. However, these vehicles don’t have to be plugged in. They can be fueled solely with gasoline but will not achieve maximum range or fuel economy without charging.

Estimating Fuel Economy. Since a plug-in can operate on electricity alone, gasoline alone, or a mixture of the two, EPA provides a fuel economy estimate for gasoline-only operation and an estimate for electric-only or gas-and-electric operation both for combined city-highway driving.


Electric Car Price Guide: Every 2015-2016 Plug-In Car, With Specs: UPDATED #cheap #car #rentals.com


#car pricing guide
#

Electric Car Price Guide: Every 2015-2016 Plug-In Car, With Specs: UPDATED

It’s a hot topic whenever anyone mentions electric cars: pricing.

Many electric cars are more expensive than their regular counterparts, though naturally they cost less to run too.

But what do today’s electric and plug-in cars actually cost? We’ve gathered together each plug-in car on sale today in one place. Every vehicle here shows the manufacturer’s suggested retail price, plus any mandatory destination and handling fees.

The prices do not include any local or federal tax incentives or rebates–so many cars here may be available cheaper, for those eligible for specific credits or rebates.

MPGe figures listed below refer to the cars’ electric efficiency, unless otherwise stated.

16 kWh battery, 62 miles (EPA), 112 MPGe, 49 kW motor

Mitsubishi’s jellybean-style electric car has never been a strong seller in the U.S, but the Japanese automaker recently slashed its pricing, making it the cheapest electric vehicle on the market. You’re still saddled with low performance and those unusual looks, but some owners could drive from a dealership having paid less than $16,000 for their i-MiEV, if they’re able to maximize their use of incentives.

17.6 kWh battery, 68 miles (EPA), 107 MPGe, 55 kW motor

Smart’s Fortwo Electric Drive is one of the cheapest new electric cars on the market. You only get two seats, but you also get rid of the gasoline car’s jerky transmission. There’s enough power to make good progress now, and if you’re able to benefit from incentives, the price starts to look quite tempting. Convertible models are an extra $3,000 but top-down electric driving is a wholly pleasant experience.

18.4 kWh battery, 82 miles (EPA), 119 MPGe, 105 kW motor

Chevrolet has put the same effort into its diminutive Spark as it did the Volt, and has managed to improve the aerodynamics and interior to match the Spark’s electric aspirations. With huge torque on offer, performance is strong and the Spark EV is good fun to drive.

24 kWh battery, 84 miles (EPA), 114 MPGe, 80 kW motor

The Leaf is one of the better-known electric cars. While sales haven’t matched Nissan’s expectations and there have been issues with battery degradation in hot weather, the Leaf is still one of the most usable electric cars on the market. 2013’s price drop made the Leaf one of the more affordable electric cars on the market.

5.2 kWh battery, 11 miles (EPA blended), 6 miles (EPA all-EV), 95 MPGe, 60 kW motor (134-hp combined)

The Prius Plug-In is a little off the pace technologically these days, but its similarity to the regular, familiar hybrid means it’s ideal for drivers trading up from a regular Prius. The short all-electric range is disappointing to some–but in terms of sales, it’s actually one of the better-selling plug-ins around.

24 kWh battery, 87 miles (EPA), 116 MPGe, 83 kW motor

Fiat’s 500e electric car may be a mere “compliance car “, but the engineers have done a great job–it’s nippy, fun to drive and probably a better vehicle than the gasoline version. Limited availability is a hindrance, though, and the price is pretty steep for such a small car. Oh, and Fiat’s boss would prefer you didn’t buy one–it’s costing him money.

7.6 kWh battery, 20 miles (EPA), 88 MPGe, 88 kW motor (195-hp combined)

Ford’s first plug-in hybrid challenger mixes good performance with impressive efficiency in electric mode. Like the Toyota Prius V, it’s a practical vehicle too, ready to handle everything family life can throw at it.

17.1 kWh battery, 38 miles (EPA), 98 MPGe, 111 kW motor

The first-generation Chevrolet Volt is on its way out as Chevy prepares to launch an all-new 2016 model in the second half of this year. Production is set to wind down soon in anticipation of the new model, but the current Volt has still been one of the best-selling plug-in cars in the U.S. over the past four years.


Electric Car Price Guide: Every 2015-2016 Plug-In Car, With Specs: UPDATED #used #car #websites


#car pricing guide
#

Electric Car Price Guide: Every 2015-2016 Plug-In Car, With Specs: UPDATED

It’s a hot topic whenever anyone mentions electric cars: pricing.

Many electric cars are more expensive than their regular counterparts, though naturally they cost less to run too.

But what do today’s electric and plug-in cars actually cost? We’ve gathered together each plug-in car on sale today in one place. Every vehicle here shows the manufacturer’s suggested retail price, plus any mandatory destination and handling fees.

The prices do not include any local or federal tax incentives or rebates–so many cars here may be available cheaper, for those eligible for specific credits or rebates.

MPGe figures listed below refer to the cars’ electric efficiency, unless otherwise stated.

16 kWh battery, 62 miles (EPA), 112 MPGe, 49 kW motor

Mitsubishi’s jellybean-style electric car has never been a strong seller in the U.S, but the Japanese automaker recently slashed its pricing, making it the cheapest electric vehicle on the market. You’re still saddled with low performance and those unusual looks, but some owners could drive from a dealership having paid less than $16,000 for their i-MiEV, if they’re able to maximize their use of incentives.

17.6 kWh battery, 68 miles (EPA), 107 MPGe, 55 kW motor

Smart’s Fortwo Electric Drive is one of the cheapest new electric cars on the market. You only get two seats, but you also get rid of the gasoline car’s jerky transmission. There’s enough power to make good progress now, and if you’re able to benefit from incentives, the price starts to look quite tempting. Convertible models are an extra $3,000 but top-down electric driving is a wholly pleasant experience.

18.4 kWh battery, 82 miles (EPA), 119 MPGe, 105 kW motor

Chevrolet has put the same effort into its diminutive Spark as it did the Volt, and has managed to improve the aerodynamics and interior to match the Spark’s electric aspirations. With huge torque on offer, performance is strong and the Spark EV is good fun to drive.

24 kWh battery, 84 miles (EPA), 114 MPGe, 80 kW motor

The Leaf is one of the better-known electric cars. While sales haven’t matched Nissan’s expectations and there have been issues with battery degradation in hot weather, the Leaf is still one of the most usable electric cars on the market. 2013’s price drop made the Leaf one of the more affordable electric cars on the market.

5.2 kWh battery, 11 miles (EPA blended), 6 miles (EPA all-EV), 95 MPGe, 60 kW motor (134-hp combined)

The Prius Plug-In is a little off the pace technologically these days, but its similarity to the regular, familiar hybrid means it’s ideal for drivers trading up from a regular Prius. The short all-electric range is disappointing to some–but in terms of sales, it’s actually one of the better-selling plug-ins around.

24 kWh battery, 87 miles (EPA), 116 MPGe, 83 kW motor

Fiat’s 500e electric car may be a mere “compliance car “, but the engineers have done a great job–it’s nippy, fun to drive and probably a better vehicle than the gasoline version. Limited availability is a hindrance, though, and the price is pretty steep for such a small car. Oh, and Fiat’s boss would prefer you didn’t buy one–it’s costing him money.

7.6 kWh battery, 20 miles (EPA), 88 MPGe, 88 kW motor (195-hp combined)

Ford’s first plug-in hybrid challenger mixes good performance with impressive efficiency in electric mode. Like the Toyota Prius V, it’s a practical vehicle too, ready to handle everything family life can throw at it.

17.1 kWh battery, 38 miles (EPA), 98 MPGe, 111 kW motor

The first-generation Chevrolet Volt is on its way out as Chevy prepares to launch an all-new 2016 model in the second half of this year. Production is set to wind down soon in anticipation of the new model, but the current Volt has still been one of the best-selling plug-in cars in the U.S. over the past four years.


Plug-in Vehicle Tracker #car #valuations


#car tracker
#

Plug-in Vehicle Tracker

What’s Coming, When.

Virtually every major auto manufacturer in the world, along with numerous smaller outfits, is developing a plug-in vehicle and Plug In America is tracking their progress. Our list below represents highway-capable cars and trucks, 2- and 3-wheeled, and commercial vehicles. To be included on this list, legitimate companies must have completed a concept, demonstration, or mule vehicle, and we list these at our discretion. Low-speed electric vehicles are not included. Vehicle prices listed do not include rebates .

If you have an update to this list, please fill us in. Plug In America needs your support to keep this list current. Please become a member or make a donation today!

Key terms: EV: Electric Vehicle, PHEV. Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle (includes Extended Range Electric Vehicles), AER. All-electric range, SOC. state-of-charge, EVSE. Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (Charging Station), SAE J1772™: US charging connector standard, CVRP. Clean Vehicle Rebate Project

Want to know what’s available for purchase or lease TODAY? Use the “Availability” filter, below.


Plug-in Hybrids #car #insurance


#best hybrid cars
#

Plug-in Hybrids

Plug-in hybrids, sometimes called Plug-in Hybrid-Electric Vehicles (PHEVs), are hybrids with high-capacity batteries that can be charged by plugging them into an electrical outlet or charging station. They can store enough electricity from the power grid to significantly reduce their petroleum consumption under typical driving conditions.

Different Kinds of Plug-in Hybrids

There are two basic plug-in hybrid configurations:

Series plug-in hybrids. also called Extended Range Electric Vehicles (EREVs). Only the electric motor turns the wheels; the gasoline engine is only used to generate electricity. Series plug-ins can run solely on electricity until the battery needs to be recharged. The gasoline engine then generates electricity to power the electric motor. For shorter trips, these vehicles might use no gasoline at all.

Parallel or Blended Plug-in Hybrids. Both the engine and electric motor are mechanically connected to the wheels, and both propel the vehicle under most driving conditions. Electric-only operation usually occurs only at low speeds.

Plug-in hybrids also have different battery capacities, allowing some to travel farther on electricity than others. Their fuel economy, like that of electric vehicles and regular hybrids, can be sensitive to driving style, driving conditions, and accessory use.

Benefits and Challenges

Less Petroleum Use. Plug-in hybrids use roughly 30% to 60% less petroleum than conventional vehicles. Since electricity is produced mostly from domestic resources, plug-in hybrids reduce oil dependence.

Less Greenhouse Gas Emissions. Plug-in hybrids typically emit less greenhouse gas than conventional vehicles, but the amount generated depends partly on the fuel used at electrical power plants nuclear and hydroelectric plants are cleaner than coal-fired power plants.

Higher Vehicle Costs, Lower Fuel Costs. A plug-in hybrid can cost roughly $4 to $8 thousand more than a comparable non-plug-in hybrid. Using electricity is usually cheaper than using gasoline sometimes much cheaper but whether fuel savings will offset the higher vehicle cost depends on the vehicle purchased, the percentage of miles operating on electricity, fuel costs, and ownership length. Federal tax incentives up to $7,500 are currently available for qualifying plug-ins.

Re-charging Takes Time. Re-charging the battery using a 120-volt household outlet can take several hours; re-charging using a 240-volt home or public charger can take roughly 1 to 4 hours; while a fast charge to 80% capacity may take as little as 30 minutes. However, these vehicles don’t have to be plugged in. They can be fueled solely with gasoline but will not achieve maximum range or fuel economy without charging.

Estimating Fuel Economy. Since a plug-in can operate on electricity alone, gasoline alone, or a mixture of the two, EPA provides a fuel economy estimate for gasoline-only operation and an estimate for electric-only or gas-and-electric operation both for combined city-highway driving.


Plug-in Hybrids #used #car #dealers


#best hybrid cars
#

Plug-in Hybrids

Plug-in hybrids, sometimes called Plug-in Hybrid-Electric Vehicles (PHEVs), are hybrids with high-capacity batteries that can be charged by plugging them into an electrical outlet or charging station. They can store enough electricity from the power grid to significantly reduce their petroleum consumption under typical driving conditions.

Different Kinds of Plug-in Hybrids

There are two basic plug-in hybrid configurations:

Series plug-in hybrids. also called Extended Range Electric Vehicles (EREVs). Only the electric motor turns the wheels; the gasoline engine is only used to generate electricity. Series plug-ins can run solely on electricity until the battery needs to be recharged. The gasoline engine then generates electricity to power the electric motor. For shorter trips, these vehicles might use no gasoline at all.

Parallel or Blended Plug-in Hybrids. Both the engine and electric motor are mechanically connected to the wheels, and both propel the vehicle under most driving conditions. Electric-only operation usually occurs only at low speeds.

Plug-in hybrids also have different battery capacities, allowing some to travel farther on electricity than others. Their fuel economy, like that of electric vehicles and regular hybrids, can be sensitive to driving style, driving conditions, and accessory use.

Benefits and Challenges

Less Petroleum Use. Plug-in hybrids use roughly 30% to 60% less petroleum than conventional vehicles. Since electricity is produced mostly from domestic resources, plug-in hybrids reduce oil dependence.

Less Greenhouse Gas Emissions. Plug-in hybrids typically emit less greenhouse gas than conventional vehicles, but the amount generated depends partly on the fuel used at electrical power plants nuclear and hydroelectric plants are cleaner than coal-fired power plants.

Higher Vehicle Costs, Lower Fuel Costs. A plug-in hybrid can cost roughly $4 to $8 thousand more than a comparable non-plug-in hybrid. Using electricity is usually cheaper than using gasoline sometimes much cheaper but whether fuel savings will offset the higher vehicle cost depends on the vehicle purchased, the percentage of miles operating on electricity, fuel costs, and ownership length. Federal tax incentives up to $7,500 are currently available for qualifying plug-ins.

Re-charging Takes Time. Re-charging the battery using a 120-volt household outlet can take several hours; re-charging using a 240-volt home or public charger can take roughly 1 to 4 hours; while a fast charge to 80% capacity may take as little as 30 minutes. However, these vehicles don’t have to be plugged in. They can be fueled solely with gasoline but will not achieve maximum range or fuel economy without charging.

Estimating Fuel Economy. Since a plug-in can operate on electricity alone, gasoline alone, or a mixture of the two, EPA provides a fuel economy estimate for gasoline-only operation and an estimate for electric-only or gas-and-electric operation both for combined city-highway driving.


Six New Plug-In Electric Cars Coming For 2014 #quality #used #cars


#electric cars
#

Six New Plug-In Electric Cars Coming For 2014

BMW i3 Coupe concept

This is an exciting time for electric car enthusiasts. From just a handful of choices only a few years ago, buyers in some states now have access to as many as a dozen different plug-in vehicles.

It’s set to get even better–over the course of the next few years, another six electric vehicles are on the way. Here’s our full run-down of the most important plug-in vehicles debuting over the next year.

The 2014 BMW i3 electric car isn’t just important, it’s exciting too–and it’s nice to be able to say that about a new electric car.

BMW has explored electric vehicles before with thorough testing programs–significantly, the MINI E and BMW ActiveE electric vehicles–and that knowledge is helping develop the i3, a compact car based on a dedicated platform. A range-extended model will also be available, to quell those with range anxiety.

It’s high-tech too, with a carbon-fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) unibody, and the i3’s minimalist innards are trimmed in sustainable materials. It’s all very futuristic, yet as tasteful and considered as any internally-combusting BMW.

And if the i3 isn’t exciting enough, the i8 plug-in hybrid sports car will arrive shortly after.

2014 Cadillac ELR

Back when Chevy launched the Volt range-extended electric car, it promised the Voltec powertrain would appear in other vehicles.

Well, this is the first “other vehicle” it’s appearing in–the 2014 Cadillac ELR. Behind the sharp-suited Cadillac styling is a thoroughly modern drivetrain, utilizing the same 1.4-liter gasoline engine as the Volt, and a similar electric drivetrain.

We say “similar” because to suit the Caddy’s upmarket status, ELR drivers do get a little more power and torque than their Volt counterparts. They also get two fewer doors, turning the ELR into a sleek and distinctive coupe. Electric range stays the same though, at around 35 miles. Deliveries should begin early 2014.

2014 Chevrolet Spark EV

2014 Chevrolet Spark EV

Initially, we suspected the Chevy Spark EV to be one of the small but growing range of “compliance cars”–electric vehicles designed and built solely to meet California’s requirements for electric vehicle sales.

Thankfully, that isn’t the case–Chevrolet is actually rather serious about the Spark EV, and as well as making it available beyond just west coast markets, they’ve thoroughly re-engineered the gasoline Spark for its new electric powertrain.

The styling differences are subtle–some blue paint here, a Volt-style grille there–but under the skin it’s a real wolf in sheep’s clothing. A 110 kW (130 horsepower) electric motor gives it far more shove than the gasoline model, and its 400 pounds-feet torque output matches that of a Ferrari 458 Italia supercar.

The Spark EV will go on sale in several U.S. markets, as well as Canada, South Korea and Europe. U.S. pricing starts at under $32,500, pre-incentives.


BYD Plans Electric Supercar, More Powerful Plug-In Hybrid #reliable #auto #transport


#byd auto
#

BYD Plans Electric Supercar, More Powerful Plug-In Hybrid

BYD Qin plug-in hybrid sedan, unveiled at Beijing International Automotive Exhibition, April 2012

BYD Auto hasn’t been in the news much lately, but the largest privately-owned Chinese carmaker hasn’t backed away from its ambitious plans.

According to China Car Times . BYD will launch a new plug-in hybrid model next year, to be called the Tang, to be followed by an electric supercar.

Both vehicles will use BYD’s lithium-iron-phosphate battery cells.

Qin seen last year

BYD has already shown a concept for its next plug-in hybrid model–to be called the Qin –and that model is expected to enter production between October and December this year.

The Qin uses a turbocharged 1.5-liter four-cylinder engine and a 110-kilowatt (148-horsepower) electric motor, for a total output of 300 hp (223 kW) and 325 pound-feet (440 Newton-meters) of torque.

That car’s 10-kilowatt-hour lithium-ion battery pack provides a 30-mile (50-km) all-electric range.

Chinese battery electric crossover: BYD e6 test drive, Los Angeles, May 2012

The new hybrid system to be called Tang will replace the Qin’s 1.5-liter turbo with a more powerful 2.0-liter turbo four.

The result will be a predicted acceleration of 0 to 62 mph in just 4.9 seconds for vehicles fitted with the updated hybrid powertrain.

S7 crossover, then E9 supercar?

China Car Times suggests that the new and more powerful hybrid system may be installed first in the company’s S7 sport-utility vehicle, and will launch sometime next year.

Then there are plans for a battery-electric vehicle to be known as the E9.

While BYD has been “extremely tight-lipped” about the E9, company officials told reporters it will be an all-electric supercar with a performance goal of 0 to 62 mph in only 3.9 seconds.

The Tesla Roadster Sport, now out of production, achieved the same goal in 3.7 seconds.

Unusual PR event

According to reporter Ash Sutcliffe, the information about BYD’s future product plans came in a venue very different from the common Chinese practice of carefully scripted public-relations events.

BYD e6 electric taxi in service in Shenzhen, China

“Basically, it was a rolled-up sleeves event where journalists were shown future tech in a relaxed environment,” Sutcliffe told Green Car Reports.

More remarkable, the assembled journalists were “allowed to ask any questions they wanted.”

With a 10-percent stake owned by fabled investor Warren Buffet. BYD attracted a lot of attention with plans to sell its E6 all-electric crossover in the U.S.

More recently the company has focused on electric buses, which will go into service in the California cities of Long Beach and Los Angeles .

_______________________________________________


Electric Car Price Guide: Every 2015-2016 Plug-In Car, With Specs: UPDATED #car #auctions #sydney


#car pricing guide
#

Electric Car Price Guide: Every 2015-2016 Plug-In Car, With Specs: UPDATED

It’s a hot topic whenever anyone mentions electric cars: pricing.

Many electric cars are more expensive than their regular counterparts, though naturally they cost less to run too.

But what do today’s electric and plug-in cars actually cost? We’ve gathered together each plug-in car on sale today in one place. Every vehicle here shows the manufacturer’s suggested retail price, plus any mandatory destination and handling fees.

The prices do not include any local or federal tax incentives or rebates–so many cars here may be available cheaper, for those eligible for specific credits or rebates.

MPGe figures listed below refer to the cars’ electric efficiency, unless otherwise stated.

16 kWh battery, 62 miles (EPA), 112 MPGe, 49 kW motor

Mitsubishi’s jellybean-style electric car has never been a strong seller in the U.S, but the Japanese automaker recently slashed its pricing, making it the cheapest electric vehicle on the market. You’re still saddled with low performance and those unusual looks, but some owners could drive from a dealership having paid less than $16,000 for their i-MiEV, if they’re able to maximize their use of incentives.

17.6 kWh battery, 68 miles (EPA), 107 MPGe, 55 kW motor

Smart’s Fortwo Electric Drive is one of the cheapest new electric cars on the market. You only get two seats, but you also get rid of the gasoline car’s jerky transmission. There’s enough power to make good progress now, and if you’re able to benefit from incentives, the price starts to look quite tempting. Convertible models are an extra $3,000 but top-down electric driving is a wholly pleasant experience.

18.4 kWh battery, 82 miles (EPA), 119 MPGe, 105 kW motor

Chevrolet has put the same effort into its diminutive Spark as it did the Volt, and has managed to improve the aerodynamics and interior to match the Spark’s electric aspirations. With huge torque on offer, performance is strong and the Spark EV is good fun to drive.

24 kWh battery, 84 miles (EPA), 114 MPGe, 80 kW motor

The Leaf is one of the better-known electric cars. While sales haven’t matched Nissan’s expectations and there have been issues with battery degradation in hot weather, the Leaf is still one of the most usable electric cars on the market. 2013’s price drop made the Leaf one of the more affordable electric cars on the market.

5.2 kWh battery, 11 miles (EPA blended), 6 miles (EPA all-EV), 95 MPGe, 60 kW motor (134-hp combined)

The Prius Plug-In is a little off the pace technologically these days, but its similarity to the regular, familiar hybrid means it’s ideal for drivers trading up from a regular Prius. The short all-electric range is disappointing to some–but in terms of sales, it’s actually one of the better-selling plug-ins around.

24 kWh battery, 87 miles (EPA), 116 MPGe, 83 kW motor

Fiat’s 500e electric car may be a mere “compliance car “, but the engineers have done a great job–it’s nippy, fun to drive and probably a better vehicle than the gasoline version. Limited availability is a hindrance, though, and the price is pretty steep for such a small car. Oh, and Fiat’s boss would prefer you didn’t buy one–it’s costing him money.

7.6 kWh battery, 20 miles (EPA), 88 MPGe, 88 kW motor (195-hp combined)

Ford’s first plug-in hybrid challenger mixes good performance with impressive efficiency in electric mode. Like the Toyota Prius V, it’s a practical vehicle too, ready to handle everything family life can throw at it.

17.1 kWh battery, 38 miles (EPA), 98 MPGe, 111 kW motor

The first-generation Chevrolet Volt is on its way out as Chevy prepares to launch an all-new 2016 model in the second half of this year. Production is set to wind down soon in anticipation of the new model, but the current Volt has still been one of the best-selling plug-in cars in the U.S. over the past four years.