2011 IIHS TOP SAFETY PICKs #cheap #car #rent


#2011 cars
#

Top Safety Pick s by year

IIHS conducts vehicle tests to determine crashworthiness — how well a vehicle protects its occupants in a crash. It also rates vehicles for front crash prevention, systems that warn the driver or brake automatically to avoid or mitigate a frontal collision. The vehicles that perform best in the tests qualify for Top Safety Pick. which has been awarded since the 2006 model year, or Top Safety Pick+. which was inaugurated in 2013.

To qualify for 2011 Top Safety Pick. a vehicle must earn good ratings in the moderate overlap front, side, roof strength and head restraint tests and must offer electronic stability control.

Models that earn Top Safety Pick are the best vehicle choices for safety within size categories. Size and weight influence occupant protection in serious crashes. Larger, heavier vehicles generally afford more protection than smaller, lighter ones. Thus, a small car that’s a Top Safety Pick doesn’t necessarily afford more protection than a bigger car that doesn’t earn the award.

All 2011 Top Safety Pick s are 2011 models unless otherwise noted.


Best Used Luxury Car 2013: The Car Connection s Picks #car #valuations #australia


#value of used car
#

Best Used Luxury Car 2013: The Car Connection’s Picks

2011 Acura MDX

Luxury cars offer a little more—of what matters to nearly everyone but the most dedicated misers. Whether it’s the reputation of the brand and the image it carries; the cabin comforts and interfaces; the innovations behind the wheel; the more refined driving experience; or the extra assurance of advanced safety features; there’s added value built into luxury marques.

Factor in a better, more personalized dealership experience, concierge services, and top-tier certified pre-owned (CPO) programs, and it’s not just a matter of the vehicle itself; luxury brands can save you valuable time—time that you’d probably rather spend with your family and friends. And as late-model used cars, after they’ve gone through their two to three years of steepest depreciation, luxury models can be quite the deal.

What separates the best used luxury cars from the rest? In order to consider models for this list, we did of course rule out models from ‘mainstream’ brands. Then we also ruled out convertibles, roadsters, and any models for which we perceive their primary mission as that of a sports car—like the Porsche 911. They’re all covered by other ‘best’ lists here at The Car Connection.

Our editors review and revisit every model on the market, each model year, and update numerical scores in six different areas: Styling, Performance, Comfort and Quality, Safety, Features, and Fuel Economy. Although we try to assign those scores against competing models, we’ll admit that we’re a little more generous with luxury cars. Considering the supple leather upholstery, high-end, concert-hall-quality audio systems, and things like massage seats, it’s hard to be critical when they offer so much contentment. So we only looked for the crème de la crème here—those vehicles that managed an excellent Overall Score of 8.5 or higher. In short, each model on the Best Used Luxury Car 2013 list scores:

  • at least that 8.5 rating on The Car Connection’s full reviews from three years ago–in this case, the 2011 model year
  • at least four circles on J.D. Power’s predicted-dependability rankings, or at least average reliability on Consumer Reports
  • no reported score lower than four stars overall from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) or a Top Safety Pick award from the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS).

What we’re left with, after applying these parameters, is a solid list of luxury vehicles—coupes, sedans, and utility vehicles. And we’ll freely admit that some of the best family-oriented luxury cars are actually crossovers, so we did indeed leave them on the list—even the Cadillac Escalade. which is a sort of diamond in the rough, and a used-vehicle gem we can’t ignore.

Unfortunately, there are a number of luxury models that we liked a lot in 2011 yet the lack of reliability or safety data led to their exclusion—the Aston Martin Rapide and the Bentley Continental Flying Spur. for instance.

Keeping in mind that these models span a very wide range of tastes and prices, here are the 2011-model-year used luxury cars that made the list—along with our Bottom Line take from the full reviews:


Consumer Reports American Top Picks 2010 #used #car #sites


#best cars 2010
#

Consumer Reports American Top Picks 2010

Every year we look at our Top Pick list from an alternative point of view, highlighting the best of the domestic industry. While we support buying the best car for your needs, regardless of where it’s made, our mailbag and e-mail inbox shows us that many buyers prefer to buy from an American brand. This is especially evident as Chrysler, Ford, and General Motors fight their way back from recent market challenges. (Read: Who makes the best cars? )

The good news is that preferring a domestic car doesn’t condemn you to a bad product. Indeed, two of the vehicles on this list, the Chevrolet Traverse and Silverado, are on our our official Top Picks list, as well. In addition, Ford has done notably well in reliability. For example, the Ford Fusion and Mercury Milan have proven to be more reliable than a Honda Accord or Toyota Camry. While these high-scoring cars come in a notch below some Japanese competitors in the marketplace as a whole, the Fusion/Milan/Lincoln MKZ sedans show up a lot when looking at domestic-branded Top Picks, as does Ford in general.

Given those parameters, we present the domestic-branded Top Picks for 2010. We have also included the top-scoring domestic-branded vehicles in each category and below provide additional insights into the list.

Consumer Reports American Top Picks 2010


Our Picks For The Best $10, 000 Used Cars #car #supermarkets #uk


#best used cars under 10000
#

Our Picks For The Best $10,000 Used Cars

slide-3452251

Fun And Interesting Used Cars For Under $5,000

Looking for a great used car but have a limited budget? We recently scoured the market for used car bargains in the $5,000-range, and were surprised by what we found.

But what if you want something just a little bit nicer, newer or dependable? Well, we have good news. If you can manage to stretch your budget to $10,000, there are lots of great cars and trucks to choose from in the used marketplace.

We challenged the Autoblog editors to find a great, versatile used car, truck or SUV for $10,000 or less. As you might expect from a group of auto journalists, there are some oddballs thrown in for fun, too.

Head on through to see what we found. But if your budget is a little bit smaller, check out our top picks for used cars under $5,000 .

slide-3452247

2005 BMW 325i – Greg Migliore

A decade-old 3 Series hits on a number of levels. It still looks reasonably cool. Friends will notice and nod approvingly at your choice of a Bimmer, while enthusiasts will appreciate your good taste in suspensions and steering. It s like drinking a Heineken. It s seldom out of place and conjures class and appeal with a lot of different crowds.

There s plenty to like in the 325i: rear-wheel drive, an inline six hooked up to a five-speed manual and an interior that s simple and clean. The outside has a similar vibe. Yes, this is obviously not the latest 3 Series, but it still looks smart and stylish. The car is just old enough that it hearkens back to a time before seemingly every luxury car was dripping in LEDs, fantastic curves and eye-popping nav screens. If you look hard, it s not difficult to get one well under $10,000.

Research More

slide-3452244

Honda Fit – Sebastian Blanco

My current car is the eminently practical 2007 Honda Fit. I bought it maybe three years ago and paid a few grand over $10,000 for it. Despite my luck in being able to drive a lot of cool new cars, I haven t regretted my purchase for a minute. The car is roomy, relatively fuel-efficient and fun to drive.

Research More

slide-3452243

1999 Mercedes C43 AMG – Dan Roth

It s a lot easier to find something interesting at $5,000 than it is for $10,000. It s probably because $10K is pretty serious used car money. You can get a respectably boring vehicle all day long for 10 grand. Or a box truck.

Because we re talking about real money, I felt obligated to be marginally responsible. I puzzled for a while, trying to come up with something that seems responsible, even conservative, but really isn t.

How about a Mercedes-Benz C43 AMG. When Mercedes had the chutzpah to introduce this car in the late 1990s, I was impressed. Take the C-Class sedan, stuff in a V8 from the S-Class; it s a Krautrock take on good old rock n roll.

These are pretty rare, so you ll need to work hard to find one, and it s not like anyone won t know that it s something special, so be prepared to spend all the money. Also be prepared for expensive upkeep. Who cares, though? Toe into that V8 and hilarity will have the propensity to ensue.

Research More

slide-3452250

2006 Mini Cooper S – Brandon Turkus

For just $10K, you can find a wide array of vehicles from the new Mini s first (and best) generation. Thanks largely to its 1.6-liter, supercharged four-cylinder, there s a terrier-like feistiness to the old R53, as this generation was known. While fine on its own, the Mini enjoys a robust aftermarket that can easily increase the standard 170 horsepower to something even more potent. Seriously, a modded Mini is a surprising straight-line performer. Also, a few simple tweaks will unleash the absolutely intoxicating whine from the Roots-type supercharger .

But by far, the best thing about the old Cooper S is the way it drives. The R53, was built before Mini worried about silly things like ride comfort. It s rough and uncouth on bumpy roads, but is absolutely dynamite on the right piece of pavement. Aside from maybe the Mazda MX-5. there is simply no car on the market that boasts such entertaining behavior at such a low price.

As for why you should go for a 2006, specifically, there are a few reasons. Mini offered to paint the roof in Pure Silver, the only year such an option was available on the standard car, meaning there are a number of rare, standout color schemes (like my personal car s Chili Red and Pure Silver color scheme). More importantly, though, 2006 was the final year of this generation, meaning the wrench-turners in Oxford should (and I say should) have turned out their best, most reliable work. That s not to say the R53 is perfect it s English after all but it s a wildly entertaining, very handsome take on the small performance car.

Research More

slide-3452245

Mitsubishi i-MiEV – Jeremy Korzeniewski

Let’s be honest. There are lots of very good choices when shopping for a used car in the $10,000-range. You could be supremely practical and buy a low-mileage Toyota or Honda. Splurge a bit and get an Acura. Want to buy American? Buick models have proven practically bulletproof when equipped with GM’s tried-and-true 3.8-liter v6 engine.

Or, you could look for fun. An AMG-fettled Mercedes. like the one Dan Roth picked would be great fun. Buy a Subaru WRX and bask in the glory of a turbocharged engine, manual transmission and all-wheel drive. (No, really. Buy one before all the good ones are gone.)

But there’s only one electric car in your price range. And it’s not the best example of the breed, either. It’s the Mitsubishi i-MiEV. seen looking oddly like a hard-boiled egg in solid white just above. It was the least-expensive EV when it was new, and so it is logically the least-expensive EV on the used market. And if that sounds good to you, you’re sure to enjoy about 60 miles of emissions-free motoring per charge, with a top speed high enough to crest any legal speed limit in America.

You think different, i-MiEV owner, and for that, I salute you.

Research More

slide-3452248

Porsche 944 – Chris Bruce

Research More

slide-3452246

Porsche Boxster – Seyth Miersma

Buying any Porsche for less than $10,000 is a fleeting proposition. The brand is one of the most loved in the world, and all of its products eventually gain collector car status.

Saab 9-2X – Steven J. Ewing


2011 IIHS TOP SAFETY PICKs #vehicle #reviews


#2011 cars
#

Top Safety Pick s by year

IIHS conducts vehicle tests to determine crashworthiness — how well a vehicle protects its occupants in a crash. It also rates vehicles for front crash prevention, systems that warn the driver or brake automatically to avoid or mitigate a frontal collision. The vehicles that perform best in the tests qualify for Top Safety Pick. which has been awarded since the 2006 model year, or Top Safety Pick+. which was inaugurated in 2013.

To qualify for 2011 Top Safety Pick. a vehicle must earn good ratings in the moderate overlap front, side, roof strength and head restraint tests and must offer electronic stability control.

Models that earn Top Safety Pick are the best vehicle choices for safety within size categories. Size and weight influence occupant protection in serious crashes. Larger, heavier vehicles generally afford more protection than smaller, lighter ones. Thus, a small car that’s a Top Safety Pick doesn’t necessarily afford more protection than a bigger car that doesn’t earn the award.

All 2011 Top Safety Pick s are 2011 models unless otherwise noted.


Best Used Luxury Car 2013: The Car Connection s Picks #e #car


#value of used car
#

Best Used Luxury Car 2013: The Car Connection’s Picks

2011 Acura MDX

Luxury cars offer a little more—of what matters to nearly everyone but the most dedicated misers. Whether it’s the reputation of the brand and the image it carries; the cabin comforts and interfaces; the innovations behind the wheel; the more refined driving experience; or the extra assurance of advanced safety features; there’s added value built into luxury marques.

Factor in a better, more personalized dealership experience, concierge services, and top-tier certified pre-owned (CPO) programs, and it’s not just a matter of the vehicle itself; luxury brands can save you valuable time—time that you’d probably rather spend with your family and friends. And as late-model used cars, after they’ve gone through their two to three years of steepest depreciation, luxury models can be quite the deal.

What separates the best used luxury cars from the rest? In order to consider models for this list, we did of course rule out models from ‘mainstream’ brands. Then we also ruled out convertibles, roadsters, and any models for which we perceive their primary mission as that of a sports car—like the Porsche 911. They’re all covered by other ‘best’ lists here at The Car Connection.

Our editors review and revisit every model on the market, each model year, and update numerical scores in six different areas: Styling, Performance, Comfort and Quality, Safety, Features, and Fuel Economy. Although we try to assign those scores against competing models, we’ll admit that we’re a little more generous with luxury cars. Considering the supple leather upholstery, high-end, concert-hall-quality audio systems, and things like massage seats, it’s hard to be critical when they offer so much contentment. So we only looked for the crème de la crème here—those vehicles that managed an excellent Overall Score of 8.5 or higher. In short, each model on the Best Used Luxury Car 2013 list scores:

  • at least that 8.5 rating on The Car Connection’s full reviews from three years ago–in this case, the 2011 model year
  • at least four circles on J.D. Power’s predicted-dependability rankings, or at least average reliability on Consumer Reports
  • no reported score lower than four stars overall from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) or a Top Safety Pick award from the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS).

What we’re left with, after applying these parameters, is a solid list of luxury vehicles—coupes, sedans, and utility vehicles. And we’ll freely admit that some of the best family-oriented luxury cars are actually crossovers, so we did indeed leave them on the list—even the Cadillac Escalade. which is a sort of diamond in the rough, and a used-vehicle gem we can’t ignore.

Unfortunately, there are a number of luxury models that we liked a lot in 2011 yet the lack of reliability or safety data led to their exclusion—the Aston Martin Rapide and the Bentley Continental Flying Spur. for instance.

Keeping in mind that these models span a very wide range of tastes and prices, here are the 2011-model-year used luxury cars that made the list—along with our Bottom Line take from the full reviews:


Consumer Reports American Top Picks 2010 #hot #wheels #cars


#best cars 2010
#

Consumer Reports American Top Picks 2010

Every year we look at our Top Pick list from an alternative point of view, highlighting the best of the domestic industry. While we support buying the best car for your needs, regardless of where it’s made, our mailbag and e-mail inbox shows us that many buyers prefer to buy from an American brand. This is especially evident as Chrysler, Ford, and General Motors fight their way back from recent market challenges. (Read: Who makes the best cars? )

The good news is that preferring a domestic car doesn’t condemn you to a bad product. Indeed, two of the vehicles on this list, the Chevrolet Traverse and Silverado, are on our our official Top Picks list, as well. In addition, Ford has done notably well in reliability. For example, the Ford Fusion and Mercury Milan have proven to be more reliable than a Honda Accord or Toyota Camry. While these high-scoring cars come in a notch below some Japanese competitors in the marketplace as a whole, the Fusion/Milan/Lincoln MKZ sedans show up a lot when looking at domestic-branded Top Picks, as does Ford in general.

Given those parameters, we present the domestic-branded Top Picks for 2010. We have also included the top-scoring domestic-branded vehicles in each category and below provide additional insights into the list.

Consumer Reports American Top Picks 2010


Best Used Luxury Car 2013: The Car Connection s Picks #car #spares


#value of used car
#

Best Used Luxury Car 2013: The Car Connection’s Picks

2011 Acura MDX

Luxury cars offer a little more—of what matters to nearly everyone but the most dedicated misers. Whether it’s the reputation of the brand and the image it carries; the cabin comforts and interfaces; the innovations behind the wheel; the more refined driving experience; or the extra assurance of advanced safety features; there’s added value built into luxury marques.

Factor in a better, more personalized dealership experience, concierge services, and top-tier certified pre-owned (CPO) programs, and it’s not just a matter of the vehicle itself; luxury brands can save you valuable time—time that you’d probably rather spend with your family and friends. And as late-model used cars, after they’ve gone through their two to three years of steepest depreciation, luxury models can be quite the deal.

What separates the best used luxury cars from the rest? In order to consider models for this list, we did of course rule out models from ‘mainstream’ brands. Then we also ruled out convertibles, roadsters, and any models for which we perceive their primary mission as that of a sports car—like the Porsche 911. They’re all covered by other ‘best’ lists here at The Car Connection.

Our editors review and revisit every model on the market, each model year, and update numerical scores in six different areas: Styling, Performance, Comfort and Quality, Safety, Features, and Fuel Economy. Although we try to assign those scores against competing models, we’ll admit that we’re a little more generous with luxury cars. Considering the supple leather upholstery, high-end, concert-hall-quality audio systems, and things like massage seats, it’s hard to be critical when they offer so much contentment. So we only looked for the crème de la crème here—those vehicles that managed an excellent Overall Score of 8.5 or higher. In short, each model on the Best Used Luxury Car 2013 list scores:

  • at least that 8.5 rating on The Car Connection’s full reviews from three years ago–in this case, the 2011 model year
  • at least four circles on J.D. Power’s predicted-dependability rankings, or at least average reliability on Consumer Reports
  • no reported score lower than four stars overall from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) or a Top Safety Pick award from the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS).

What we’re left with, after applying these parameters, is a solid list of luxury vehicles—coupes, sedans, and utility vehicles. And we’ll freely admit that some of the best family-oriented luxury cars are actually crossovers, so we did indeed leave them on the list—even the Cadillac Escalade. which is a sort of diamond in the rough, and a used-vehicle gem we can’t ignore.

Unfortunately, there are a number of luxury models that we liked a lot in 2011 yet the lack of reliability or safety data led to their exclusion—the Aston Martin Rapide and the Bentley Continental Flying Spur. for instance.

Keeping in mind that these models span a very wide range of tastes and prices, here are the 2011-model-year used luxury cars that made the list—along with our Bottom Line take from the full reviews:


Our Picks For The Best $10, 000 Used Cars #kenwood #car #audio


#best used cars under 10000
#

Our Picks For The Best $10,000 Used Cars

slide-3452251

Fun And Interesting Used Cars For Under $5,000

Looking for a great used car but have a limited budget? We recently scoured the market for used car bargains in the $5,000-range, and were surprised by what we found.

But what if you want something just a little bit nicer, newer or dependable? Well, we have good news. If you can manage to stretch your budget to $10,000, there are lots of great cars and trucks to choose from in the used marketplace.

We challenged the Autoblog editors to find a great, versatile used car, truck or SUV for $10,000 or less. As you might expect from a group of auto journalists, there are some oddballs thrown in for fun, too.

Head on through to see what we found. But if your budget is a little bit smaller, check out our top picks for used cars under $5,000 .

slide-3452247

2005 BMW 325i – Greg Migliore

A decade-old 3 Series hits on a number of levels. It still looks reasonably cool. Friends will notice and nod approvingly at your choice of a Bimmer, while enthusiasts will appreciate your good taste in suspensions and steering. It s like drinking a Heineken. It s seldom out of place and conjures class and appeal with a lot of different crowds.

There s plenty to like in the 325i: rear-wheel drive, an inline six hooked up to a five-speed manual and an interior that s simple and clean. The outside has a similar vibe. Yes, this is obviously not the latest 3 Series, but it still looks smart and stylish. The car is just old enough that it hearkens back to a time before seemingly every luxury car was dripping in LEDs, fantastic curves and eye-popping nav screens. If you look hard, it s not difficult to get one well under $10,000.

Research More

slide-3452244

Honda Fit – Sebastian Blanco

My current car is the eminently practical 2007 Honda Fit. I bought it maybe three years ago and paid a few grand over $10,000 for it. Despite my luck in being able to drive a lot of cool new cars, I haven t regretted my purchase for a minute. The car is roomy, relatively fuel-efficient and fun to drive.

Research More

slide-3452243

1999 Mercedes C43 AMG – Dan Roth

It s a lot easier to find something interesting at $5,000 than it is for $10,000. It s probably because $10K is pretty serious used car money. You can get a respectably boring vehicle all day long for 10 grand. Or a box truck.

Because we re talking about real money, I felt obligated to be marginally responsible. I puzzled for a while, trying to come up with something that seems responsible, even conservative, but really isn t.

How about a Mercedes-Benz C43 AMG. When Mercedes had the chutzpah to introduce this car in the late 1990s, I was impressed. Take the C-Class sedan, stuff in a V8 from the S-Class; it s a Krautrock take on good old rock n roll.

These are pretty rare, so you ll need to work hard to find one, and it s not like anyone won t know that it s something special, so be prepared to spend all the money. Also be prepared for expensive upkeep. Who cares, though? Toe into that V8 and hilarity will have the propensity to ensue.

Research More

slide-3452250

2006 Mini Cooper S – Brandon Turkus

For just $10K, you can find a wide array of vehicles from the new Mini s first (and best) generation. Thanks largely to its 1.6-liter, supercharged four-cylinder, there s a terrier-like feistiness to the old R53, as this generation was known. While fine on its own, the Mini enjoys a robust aftermarket that can easily increase the standard 170 horsepower to something even more potent. Seriously, a modded Mini is a surprising straight-line performer. Also, a few simple tweaks will unleash the absolutely intoxicating whine from the Roots-type supercharger .

But by far, the best thing about the old Cooper S is the way it drives. The R53, was built before Mini worried about silly things like ride comfort. It s rough and uncouth on bumpy roads, but is absolutely dynamite on the right piece of pavement. Aside from maybe the Mazda MX-5. there is simply no car on the market that boasts such entertaining behavior at such a low price.

As for why you should go for a 2006, specifically, there are a few reasons. Mini offered to paint the roof in Pure Silver, the only year such an option was available on the standard car, meaning there are a number of rare, standout color schemes (like my personal car s Chili Red and Pure Silver color scheme). More importantly, though, 2006 was the final year of this generation, meaning the wrench-turners in Oxford should (and I say should) have turned out their best, most reliable work. That s not to say the R53 is perfect it s English after all but it s a wildly entertaining, very handsome take on the small performance car.

Research More

slide-3452245

Mitsubishi i-MiEV – Jeremy Korzeniewski

Let’s be honest. There are lots of very good choices when shopping for a used car in the $10,000-range. You could be supremely practical and buy a low-mileage Toyota or Honda. Splurge a bit and get an Acura. Want to buy American? Buick models have proven practically bulletproof when equipped with GM’s tried-and-true 3.8-liter v6 engine.

Or, you could look for fun. An AMG-fettled Mercedes. like the one Dan Roth picked would be great fun. Buy a Subaru WRX and bask in the glory of a turbocharged engine, manual transmission and all-wheel drive. (No, really. Buy one before all the good ones are gone.)

But there’s only one electric car in your price range. And it’s not the best example of the breed, either. It’s the Mitsubishi i-MiEV. seen looking oddly like a hard-boiled egg in solid white just above. It was the least-expensive EV when it was new, and so it is logically the least-expensive EV on the used market. And if that sounds good to you, you’re sure to enjoy about 60 miles of emissions-free motoring per charge, with a top speed high enough to crest any legal speed limit in America.

You think different, i-MiEV owner, and for that, I salute you.

Research More

slide-3452248

Porsche 944 – Chris Bruce

Research More

slide-3452246

Porsche Boxster – Seyth Miersma

Buying any Porsche for less than $10,000 is a fleeting proposition. The brand is one of the most loved in the world, and all of its products eventually gain collector car status.

Saab 9-2X – Steven J. Ewing


Best Used Luxury Car 2013: The Car Connection s Picks #sbi #car #loan


#value of used car
#

Best Used Luxury Car 2013: The Car Connection’s Picks

2011 Acura MDX

Luxury cars offer a little more—of what matters to nearly everyone but the most dedicated misers. Whether it’s the reputation of the brand and the image it carries; the cabin comforts and interfaces; the innovations behind the wheel; the more refined driving experience; or the extra assurance of advanced safety features; there’s added value built into luxury marques.

Factor in a better, more personalized dealership experience, concierge services, and top-tier certified pre-owned (CPO) programs, and it’s not just a matter of the vehicle itself; luxury brands can save you valuable time—time that you’d probably rather spend with your family and friends. And as late-model used cars, after they’ve gone through their two to three years of steepest depreciation, luxury models can be quite the deal.

What separates the best used luxury cars from the rest? In order to consider models for this list, we did of course rule out models from ‘mainstream’ brands. Then we also ruled out convertibles, roadsters, and any models for which we perceive their primary mission as that of a sports car—like the Porsche 911. They’re all covered by other ‘best’ lists here at The Car Connection.

Our editors review and revisit every model on the market, each model year, and update numerical scores in six different areas: Styling, Performance, Comfort and Quality, Safety, Features, and Fuel Economy. Although we try to assign those scores against competing models, we’ll admit that we’re a little more generous with luxury cars. Considering the supple leather upholstery, high-end, concert-hall-quality audio systems, and things like massage seats, it’s hard to be critical when they offer so much contentment. So we only looked for the crème de la crème here—those vehicles that managed an excellent Overall Score of 8.5 or higher. In short, each model on the Best Used Luxury Car 2013 list scores:

  • at least that 8.5 rating on The Car Connection’s full reviews from three years ago–in this case, the 2011 model year
  • at least four circles on J.D. Power’s predicted-dependability rankings, or at least average reliability on Consumer Reports
  • no reported score lower than four stars overall from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) or a Top Safety Pick award from the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS).

What we’re left with, after applying these parameters, is a solid list of luxury vehicles—coupes, sedans, and utility vehicles. And we’ll freely admit that some of the best family-oriented luxury cars are actually crossovers, so we did indeed leave them on the list—even the Cadillac Escalade. which is a sort of diamond in the rough, and a used-vehicle gem we can’t ignore.

Unfortunately, there are a number of luxury models that we liked a lot in 2011 yet the lack of reliability or safety data led to their exclusion—the Aston Martin Rapide and the Bentley Continental Flying Spur. for instance.

Keeping in mind that these models span a very wide range of tastes and prices, here are the 2011-model-year used luxury cars that made the list—along with our Bottom Line take from the full reviews: