Help for IRS Tax Problems #colorado #irs #tax #debt, #denver #irs #audit, #irs #lien, #wage #garnishment, #irs #penalties, #tax #levies, #tax #debt #relief, #free #tax #analysis, #tax #problems, #irs #resolution, #fil;ing #back #taxes, #settling #irs #debt, #reducing #irs #taxes #owed, #reduce #irs #debt, #failing #to #file #taxes, #irs #offer #in #compromise, #oic, #irs #installment #agreements, #cnc, #tax #penalty #and #interest


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Colorado CPA Firm License #: 0013414

Tax Resolution Specialist – Help for IRS Tax Problems

Ignoring IRS tax problems can be a costly mistake. If you owe back taxes and don’t deal with your tax debt, penalties and interest will add up and the IRS may resort to liens, levies, or wage garnishment to recover their money. If you’re in this situation, there is hope. The trusted tax professionals at Fraser, Waldrop & Company CPAs Inc. are ready to find a permanent solution to your tax problems with the IRS.

Fraser, Waldrop & Company CPAs Inc. is not like most IRS problem resolution companies. We are owned and operated by a trusted Denver CPA known for his honesty and integrity. Our staff includes experienced legal and tax professionals along with licensed CPAs, so we understand complicated federal and Colorado tax issues.

The trusted tax professionals at Denver, CO CPA firm Fraser, Waldrop & Company CPAs Inc. are committed to helping you find a fair solution to your IRS tax debt issues. We will work with you to file back taxes, reduce your tax debt and resolve your IRS problems. Stop the harassing phone calls and get your peace of mind back today! Call 303-759-3124 now for a free and confidential introductory consultation .

Tax Problems

Fraser, Waldrop & Company CPAs Inc. will work with you file back taxes, remove tax liens and levies, end wage garnishment, or help you survive an audit.

Tax Solutions

Find a fair solution to your tax problems! We can arrange for an installment agreement, penalty abatement, offer in compromise, or other ways to settle your tax debt.

Contact Us

Get in touch and get yourself started on the road to tax relief today! We service clients in Aurora, Centennial, Parker, Englewood, Littleton, and throughout the Denver area.

Trusted Tax Relief Experts

Work with experienced CPA firm Fraser, Waldrop & Company CPAs Inc. to solve your IRS problems once and for all.

IRS Tax Problems

Click on the images below to learn more about each IRS tax problem.

Back Taxes Failure to File

Trust your accounting to experienced Denver, CO CPA firm Fraser, Waldrop & Company CPAs Inc. We’ll take care of the financial end of your business so you can focus on daily operations and generating revenue.

IRS Tax Audits

Tax Levies

Tax Liens

Wage Garnishment

Why Choose Us?

Taxpayers that owe back taxes and high tax penalties are vulnerable to aggressive IRS collection tactics including liens, levies, and wage garnishment. Fraser, Waldrop & Company CPAs Inc. is proud to assist these individuals and business owners with practical tax relief solutions and sound financial advice. We’re a local Denver, CO tax resolution firm with a fine reputation for integrity and a passion for helping people with IRS problems.

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A Bank Account With No Overdraft Fees – Consumer Reports #overdrafts, #prepaid #cards, #chase, #bank #of #america, #wells #fargo, #citi, #overdraft #penalty, #penalty, #direct #deposit, #mobile #check #deposit, #cashless #society, #person-to-person #payments, #p2p


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A Bank Account With No Overdraft Fees

If you’re bedeviled by overdraft fees that can cost $25 to $35 a pop, try this: Get a bank or credit union account that is designed to prevent overdrafts. If your balance does go into the red, the financial institution won’t charge you a penalty.

The nation’s five largest banks—Bank of America, Chase, Citi, U.S. Bank, and Wells Fargo—now offer these so-called lower-risk accounts, which offer just about all the same services a regular checking account provides but do not charge overdraft fees.

Citi’s Access account, for example, provides a debit card for retail store and online purchases, free cash withdrawals at thousands of Citi ATMs, direct paycheck deposit and mobile check deposit. and online and mobile banking and bill-payment.

The monthly fee for this account at Citi is $10, but it’s easily waived if you have one direct deposit per month of your paycheck, pension, or Social Security or other government benefit, or make one online bill payment per month. At the other banks the monthly fee is around $5.

The main difference between these bank accounts and regular checking: You can’t write paper checks. That’s how the bank prevents overdraft fees; all of your banking is done electronically via the debit card, which allows the bank to disburse funds only up to the amount you have on deposit.

Not offering paper checks is less of a problem than it may seem, because America is well on its way to becoming a cashless society. With online bill-pay, for instance, you make payments electronically, and if the biller hasn’t yet gone digital, your bank or credit union will print and mail a paper check for you free—no checks, envelopes, or postage stamps to buy. With person-to-person (P2P) payments. you can send money digitally to virtually anyone.

How much did you spend last year on overdraft fees?

Tell us in the comments section below.

Hidden Advantage

If these lower-risk accounts sound a lot like prepaid cards, you’re right. They are prepaid cards. That’s exactly what Chase calls its Liquid card and what Wells Fargo calls its EasyPay card. The other three use names that don’t quite sound like either checking or prepaid: Citi Access. Bank of America SafeBalance Banking. and U.S. Bank Safe Debit Account .

In recent years, prepaid cards issued by American Express, Walmart, Green Dot, and other brands that you might not think of as banks have evolved to become more like checking accounts. With the exception of Chase, whose Liquid card ranked highly in our ratings of prepaid cards. these major banks are playing catch-up.

“Those leading the prepaid card bandwagon are credit unions, Walmart, Amex, and Chase,” says Mike Moebs, economist and CEO of Moebs Services, a Chicago-based consulting firm that tracks bank and credit union pricing and products. About 30 percent of credit unions offer prepaid cards vs. 18 percent of banks, according to Moebs’ latest survey of 3,800 financial institutions.

Banks offer one big advantage that makes their prepaid cards even more like checking: They maintain networks of branches and ATMs, where cash deposits can be made. Non-bank prepaid cards usually have no branches, so their cardholders have a harder time depositing cash to their accounts. Non-bank prepaid cards do have ATM networks, but cardholders usually cannot make cash deposits via those ATMs. Instead, they must rely on participating retailers, where they can load cash onto the cards.

Benefits for Low-Income Consumers

Lower-risk accounts might be a little hard to find because banks don’t always prominently promote them.

Banks offer these accounts to help low-income consumers, who often get snagged by overdraft fees that they can’t afford. That can push them away from traditional banks and into the arms of overpriced alternative financial service providers, such as check-cashing storefronts and car title lenders .

The lower-risk accounts can help re-open the doors to essential banking services for these underserved consumers. Last February, Richard Cordray, director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, urged the nation’s top 25 retail banks to offer and promote lower-risk accounts by featuring them prominently on their online checking account web pages and in their other marketing efforts.

The lack of marketing for these products has lessened their visibility, Cordray said, and the concern is that the consumers who need these accounts most don’t know they exist.

But when we looked at the five biggest banks’ checking account web pages in late September, using a California ZIP code to let the bank know our location, their lower-risk accounts were still hard to find. On Wells Fargo’s checking account web page, for example, the bank’s regular, interest, and rewards checking accounts were easy to find on the first page of the site. But we had to scroll down to the bottom of the page to find a link to EasyPay.

It was a similar situation when looking for Bank of America SafeBalance Banking and the U.S. BankSafe Debit Account. Chase Liquid was not even on the checking account menu. Citi, however, had the most prominent positioning. Its Access account was included in a comparison of all Citi checking accounts.

Shopping links are provided by eBay Commerce Network and Amazon, which makes it easy to find the right product from a variety of online retailers. Clicking any of the links will take you to the retailer’s website to shop for this product. Please note that Consumer Reports collects fees from both eBay Commerce Network and Amazon for referring users. We use 100% of these fees to fund our testing programs.


72(t) Calculator #annuity #early #withdrawal #penalty


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72(t) Calculator

The Internal Revenue Code section 72(t) and 72(q) can allow for penalty free early withdrawals from retirement accounts under certain circumstances. These sections can allow you to begin receiving money from your retirement accounts before you turn age 59-1/2 generally without the normal 10% premature distribution penalty. Use this calculator to determine your allowable 72(t)/(q) Distribution and how it maybe able to help fund your early retirement. The IRS rules regarding 72(t)/(q) Distributions are complex. Please consult a qualified professional when making decisions about your personal finances. Please note that your financial institution may or may not support all the methods displayed via this calculator.

Javascript is required for this calculator. If you are using Internet Explorer, you may need to select to ‘Allow Blocked Content’ to view this calculator.

For more information about these these financial calculators please visit: Dinkytown.net Financial Calculators from KJE Computer Solutions, Inc.

72(t) Calculator Definitions

Reasonable interest rate This is any rate less than or equal to 120% of the Federal Mid-Term rate for either of the two months immediately preceding the month in which the distribution begins. Click here for more information. **72TRATE_DEFINITION**

It is important to note that the associated law that created 72(t) distributions did not define what was to be considered a reasonable interest rate. As such, the guidance from the IRS generally flows from the concept that they will not allow people to circumvent the requirement of substantially equal periodic payments (SEPP) throughout your lifetime by using an unreasonably high interest rate.

72(t) withdrawals setup prior to January 2003, had some flexibility in the choice of the reasonable rate to use. However, in 2002, the IRS issued new rules stating that only rates less than or equal to 120% of the Federal Mid-Term rate would be considered reasonable. You are now required to use a rate that is less than or equal to 120% of the Federal Mid-Term rate for either of the two months immediately prior to the start of your distribution plan.

Substantially Equal Periodic Payments (SEPP) The rules for 72(t)/(q) distributions require you to receive Substantially Equal Periodic Payments (SEPP) based on your life expectancy to avoid a 10% premature distribution penalty on any amounts you withdraw. Payments must last for five years (the five-year period does not end until the fifth anniversary of the first distribution received) or until you are 59-1/2, whichever is longer. Further, the SEPP amount must be calculated using one of the IRS approved methods which include:

  • Required minimum distribution method: This is the simplest method for calculating your SEPP, but it also typically produces the lowest payment. It simply takes your current balance and divides it by your single life expectancy or joint life expectancy. Your payment is then recalculated each year with your account balance as of December 31st of the preceding year and your current life expectancy. This is the only method that allows for a payment that will change as your account value changes. Even though this may provide the lowest payment, it may be the best distribution method if you expect wide fluctuations in the value of your account.
  • Fixed amortization method: With this method, the amount to be distributed annually is determined by amortizing your account balance over your single life expectancy, the uniform life expectancy table or joint life expectancy with your oldest named beneficiary.
  • Fixed annuitization method: This method uses an annuity factor to calculate your SEPP. This is one of the most complex methods. The IRS explains it as taking the taxpayer’s account balance divided by an annuity factor equal to the present value of an annuity of $1 per month beginning at the taxpayer’s age attained in the first distribution year and continuing for the life of the taxpayer. For example, if the annuity factor for a $1 per year annuity for an individual who is 50 years old is 19.087 (assuming an interest rate of 3.8% percent), an individual with a $100,000 account balance would receive an annual distribution of $5,239 ($100,000/19.087 = $5,239). This calculator uses the mortality table published in IRS Revenue Ruling 2002-62, which is a non-sex based mortality table. Please note that your annuitized SEPP is based on your life expectancy only, and is not based on the age of your beneficiary.
  • In addition, on July 3rd, 2002, the IRS ruled that you could change your distribution type one-time without penalty from the Annuitized or Amortized methods to the Required Minimum Distribution method. This would allow account holders the option to move from a fixed payment type to a payment that fluctuates annually with the value of their account. The primary reason for this exception is to allow individuals who have suffered large losses, the option to reduce their distribution to prevent their retirement account from being prematurely depleted. For more information on this important exception please see Revenue Ruling 2002-62 on www.treasury.gov.

    If payments are changed for any reason other than death or disability before the required distribution period ends, the distributions may be subject to a retroactive application of the Premature Distribution penalty. It is 10% (plus interest) for all years beginning the year such payments commenced and ending the year of the modification. It is important to remember that while 72(t) distributions are not subject to the 10% penalty for early withdrawal, all applicable taxes on the distributions must still be paid. Further, taking any early distributions from a retirement account reduces the amount of money available later during your retirement. Please contact a qualified professional for more information.

    Account balance The account balance used to determine the payment must be determined in a reasonable manner. For example, with a first distribution taken on July 15, 2013, it would be reasonable to determine the account balance based on the value of the IRA from December 31, 2013 to July 15, 2013. For subsequent years, the same valuation date should be used.

    Your age This is your current age. Use the age you will turn on your birthday for the year you are receiving the distribution.

    Beneficiary age This is your beneficiary’s age. Use the age your beneficiary will turn on their birthday for the year you are receiving the distribution. This entry is ignored if you do not use your Joint Life Expectancy to calculate your SEPP.

    Choose life expectancy tables There are three different life expectancy tables that the IRS allows you to use when calculating your SEPP with the ‘Fixed Amortization’ or the ‘Required Minimum Distribution’ methods. It is important to note that once you have chosen a distribution method and life expectancy table, you cannot change either throughout the course of your distributions. (Except for a one-time change from the Annuitized or Amortized methods to the Life Expectancy method, see SEPP definition for more details). The three life expectancy options are:

    This is a non-sex based table developed by the IRS to simplify minimum distribution requirements. The uniform lifetime table estimates joint survivorship, but does not use your beneficiary’s age to determine the resulting life expectancy. This table can be used by all account owners regardless of marital status or selected beneficiary.

    Single Life Expectancy

    This is a non-sex based life expectancy table. This table does not use your beneficiary’s age to calculate your life expectancy. This table can be used by all account owners regardless of marital status or selected beneficiary. Choosing single life expectancy will produce the highest distribution of the three available life expectancy tables.

    Joint Life Expectancy

    This is also a non-sex based life expectancy table for determining joint survivorship using your oldest named beneficiary.