436 Model Shop supplier of R, cars for sale nz.#Cars #for #sale #nz


cars for sale nz

Cars for sale nz

Cars for sale nz

Cars for sale nz Cars for sale nz Cars for sale nz Cars for sale nz Cars for sale nz Cars for sale nz Cars for sale nz Cars for sale nz Cars for sale nz Cars for sale nz

Cars for sale nz

Cars for sale nz

Cars for sale nz

Select the category you are interested in from the list below.

Cars for sale nzAircraft Accessories

Cars for sale nzAircraft Plans

Cars for sale nzAirplanes

Cars for sale nzBARGAIN BIN

Cars for sale nzBatteries

Cars for sale nzBuilding Accessories

Cars for sale nzBuilding Materials

Cars for sale nzCar Accessories

Cars for sale nzChargers/Cyclers

Cars for sale nzControl Line & F.Flight

Cars for sale nzCovering

Cars for sale nzDu-Bro

Cars for sale nzEng Access. & Parts

Cars for sale nzEngines Zenoah Parts

Cars for sale nzExhausts & Mufflers

Cars for sale nzFasteners

Cars for sale nzField Equipment

Cars for sale nzFree Flight

Cars for sale nzFuel & Accessories

Cars for sale nzGlow Plugs

Cars for sale nzH/Launch Accessories

Cars for sale nzHelicopters/ Access

Cars for sale nzPaints & Accessories

Cars for sale nzPilot Figures

Cars for sale nzPropellers

Cars for sale nzRadio Accessories

Cars for sale nzRailroad

Cars for sale nzRetract Landing Gear

Cars for sale nzRobart

Cars for sale nzServos

Cars for sale nzSIG

Cars for sale nzSpinners

Cars for sale nzSullivan

Cars for sale nzTools

Cars for sale nzWheels & Accessories

Cars for sale nz


Car buying guide – Consumer NZ #car #supermarket #uk


#cars guide
#

Car buying guide

Everything you need to know about buying new and used cars

We explain the laws governing car sales, tell you how to deal with a dealer and how to decide if a car is worth buying. Plus reliable makes, car reviews and more.

When to trade up

Are regular trade-ups the smart thing to do?

It used to be that regular trade-ups of relatively new cars were the smart way to keep yourself on the road without paying too much in maintenance. But our surveys show cars are lasting way longer than they used to before the big repair bills kick in. So when should you buy a new one? Here’s our advice.

Around a third of a new car’s value will vanish by the end of the third year.

Run your car for as long as possible

One of the biggest costs of owning a car is depreciation, and the best way to minimise the effect of this is simple: keep your car longer. Around a third of a new car’s value will vanish by the end of the third year, and half by 5 years. Thereafter, if it’s a good car and you look after it, the rate slows down: by 10 years it will still hold around 20 percent of its value.

If you buy a 5-year-old car and keep it for 5 years, you’ll lose a lot less than buying new. You might want to run it even longer. The extra costs of replacing worn items in a well-maintained old car should still be a lot less than the depreciation on a new or near-new car. Shop around to keep repair costs down.

Watch for rust

The big warning sign is rust. Once rust takes hold, the car loses value rapidly and it is expensive to repair. If your car has rust, it could be time to sell.

The good news, though, is that rust is not the problem it used to be. Remember all those rusted-out doors and station-wagon tailgates in the 1980s? You don’t often see them now, because factory rust-prevention treatments are so much better.

Don’t worry about the odometer

Don’t worry about the odometer racking up large numbers. Once it clicks over 100,000 kilometres the distance travelled has less effect on the value. We hear of lots of cars that are still reliable at well over 200,000 kilometres.

Should you buy a new car?

Cars depreciate most during their first few years. That makes buying a new car and selling it after a few years a very expensive exercise. But many new cars can be bought at good discounts from the listed price. If you haggle hard to get a good discount and keep the car for at least 10 years, you will have the pleasure of buying a new car and you can ensure it is serviced regularly – so it should be reliable. Car safety improvements in recent years also means you will have a safer vehicle.

If buying new is not for you, then find a good car that has got past the worst part of the depreciation. But remember every time a car is sold, dealers take a chunk of profit. You pay that. Look for.

  • 2-3-year-old cars. They may have the remainder of the factory 3-year warranty, and are not too far behind in safety features.
  • Slightly older models, including Japanese imports, can be bought with factory-backed warranties under schemes run by the major car importers. The factory checks the cars, fixes any problems and sells them through dealer-approved schemes.
  • If your budget won’t stretch that far, look for well-maintained models 6 or more years old, even with over 100,000km on the clock.

Buy a reliable model

Pick from the models we recommend for reliability. For full details, see our Car reliability report.


Car and Van Hire NZ #car #finance #deals


#rental cars
#

New Zealand’s Leading Rent a Car and Van Hire Services

A Kiwi Car Rental Legend

One of the most established car rental companies in New Zealand, Pegasus Rental Cars has been supplying clients with affordable and reliable hire cars since 1989. With vehicle fleets across 14 different locations in New Zealand, and a great range of rental deals, we make it easy for you to rent a car or van.

Leading the way for car rental companies throughout NZ

Our Aim

Our aim is to provide you with a quality vehicle that will allow you to make the most of our beautiful country. We strive to accommodate all of our clients’ needs by offering a range of services, extras, discounts, and deals that you won’t find at any other car rental companies in NZ.

Our Fleet

We offer a wide variety of van and car models for hire. In fact, we offer more range than any other rental companies in NZ! Whether you want a two-door hatchback, a station wagon, a 4WD, a van, or a minibus, we have a vehicle to suit your needs. All of our vehicles are reliable, fuel-efficient, and come with air conditioning. Check our rental deals page to snap up a bargain!

Airport Car Hire

Why waste even a minute of your time in New Zealand when you can rent with us and get your road trip underway as soon as your plane touches down. We offer airport pickup during business hours, shuttle and drop-off services from all of the major airports including Auckland. Christchurch. and Dunedin. Our pick up and drop off services may vary from branch to branch.

More reasons to hire a car or van from us


Moore takes Hampton Downs Round win in BNT NZ Touring Cars #car #tax #bands


#holden cars
#

Moore takes Hampton Downs Round win in BNT NZ Touring Cars

Monday, 30 November 2015, 11:43 am

Moore takes Hampton Downs Round win in BNT NZ Touring Cars

Auckland driver Richard Moore has starred in his debut of the BNT NZ Touring Cars at Hampton Downs this weekend by taking the Class one round win in his Holden Commodore.

The class one round podium rounded out by Simon Evans in second with Jason Bargwanna in third.

Moore notched up a third place in Saturday’s opening encounter in what was a rain affected race, as series leader Simon Evans speared off the track finishing well down the order.

Moore had actually won the race, before a post race investigation penalized eleven drivers for weaving across the track after the safety car lights had gone out following the Evans incident.

A 10-second penalty relegated Moore to third place, with Jason Bargwanna in his Toyota Camry promoted to the race win.

Race conditions for Sunday’s two races saw clear skies and hot conditions greet drivers at the north Waikato circuit, where Evans fought back claiming two wins, with Moore close behind with two-second place finishes.

Moore who worked doubly hard by also competing in the UDC V8 Ute series, taking the round win there also says the weekend result was the perfect way to get his ‘late’ championship campaign started.

“Unbelievable! I haven’t been in a car like this for 12 months. We won in the ute too, it was the perfect weekend really,” says Moore.

“Big thanks to our sponsor group GVI.kiwi, Mike Pero and DownForce Advanced Driver Training – without them we wouldn’t have been here this weekend.”

“It’s all about building the momentum now, keep the ball rolling. We’ll get some more sponsorship support between now and the next round and hopefully continue the fight up front when the championship heads to the South Island in the new year.”

Simon Evans still leads the championship on 564 points, with Bargwanna in second on 505, and young Australian driver Bryce Fullwood in third on 400 points.

Class two was won by Wellington’s Brock Cooley, his first round win of the season. Auckland’s Brad Lathrope taking second place ahead of Hamilton’s Simon Fleming who took third.

The trio capitalizing on the misfortune of class two championship leader Kevin Williams who struck trouble in race two of the weekend with a DNF.

For Cooley however, he was pleased to be able to convert car speed into solid results for championship campaign.

“The Speedy Signs Falcon has been quick all weekend and we made the most of it. We won the first two races and grabbed second in the last one. Very happy.”

“We’re now second in the championship, 24 points behind Kevin, bring on the next two rounds in the South Island.”

The BNT NZ Touring Cars now head to the South Island for the next two rounds. Ruapuna just outside of Christchurch January 16-17 followed by Teretonga near Invercargill January 23-24.


Moore takes Hampton Downs Round win in BNT NZ Touring Cars #japanese #import #cars


#holden cars
#

Moore takes Hampton Downs Round win in BNT NZ Touring Cars

Monday, 30 November 2015, 11:43 am

Moore takes Hampton Downs Round win in BNT NZ Touring Cars

Auckland driver Richard Moore has starred in his debut of the BNT NZ Touring Cars at Hampton Downs this weekend by taking the Class one round win in his Holden Commodore.

The class one round podium rounded out by Simon Evans in second with Jason Bargwanna in third.

Moore notched up a third place in Saturday’s opening encounter in what was a rain affected race, as series leader Simon Evans speared off the track finishing well down the order.

Moore had actually won the race, before a post race investigation penalized eleven drivers for weaving across the track after the safety car lights had gone out following the Evans incident.

A 10-second penalty relegated Moore to third place, with Jason Bargwanna in his Toyota Camry promoted to the race win.

Race conditions for Sunday’s two races saw clear skies and hot conditions greet drivers at the north Waikato circuit, where Evans fought back claiming two wins, with Moore close behind with two-second place finishes.

Moore who worked doubly hard by also competing in the UDC V8 Ute series, taking the round win there also says the weekend result was the perfect way to get his ‘late’ championship campaign started.

“Unbelievable! I haven’t been in a car like this for 12 months. We won in the ute too, it was the perfect weekend really,” says Moore.

“Big thanks to our sponsor group GVI.kiwi, Mike Pero and DownForce Advanced Driver Training – without them we wouldn’t have been here this weekend.”

“It’s all about building the momentum now, keep the ball rolling. We’ll get some more sponsorship support between now and the next round and hopefully continue the fight up front when the championship heads to the South Island in the new year.”

Simon Evans still leads the championship on 564 points, with Bargwanna in second on 505, and young Australian driver Bryce Fullwood in third on 400 points.

Class two was won by Wellington’s Brock Cooley, his first round win of the season. Auckland’s Brad Lathrope taking second place ahead of Hamilton’s Simon Fleming who took third.

The trio capitalizing on the misfortune of class two championship leader Kevin Williams who struck trouble in race two of the weekend with a DNF.

For Cooley however, he was pleased to be able to convert car speed into solid results for championship campaign.

“The Speedy Signs Falcon has been quick all weekend and we made the most of it. We won the first two races and grabbed second in the last one. Very happy.”

“We’re now second in the championship, 24 points behind Kevin, bring on the next two rounds in the South Island.”

The BNT NZ Touring Cars now head to the South Island for the next two rounds. Ruapuna just outside of Christchurch January 16-17 followed by Teretonga near Invercargill January 23-24.


Car dealer s Trade Me ad indefensible – Business – NZ Herald News #sports #car


#trademe cars
#

Car dealer’s Trade Me ad ‘indefensible’

Google+ 0

The car was advertised as being a 2005 model, when it was in fact a year older than that.

An Auckland car dealership has been rapped over the knuckles and ordered to pay compensation for trimming a year off the age of a car it sold through Trade Me.

Glenfield Wholesale Limited, trading as Real Wholesale Cars, sold Bo Zhang a Toyota Alphard for $14,450 in May this year.

The vehicle was advertised on Trade Me as being a 2005 model but when Zhang received the certificate of registration a week after purchase, he found his car was a 2004 model.

He contacted Real Wholesale Cars, who denied the vehicle was a 2005 model and continued to do so for a month.

Zhang went to the Motor Vehicles Disputes Tribunal claiming a remedy under the Fair Trading Act.

A hearing was held in Auckland on September 2 and the tribunal has now released its decision, in which it said Zhang was “most certainly misled into believing he was being sold a 2005 model vehicle”.

Real Wholesale Cars’ conduct was “indefensible” and “deliberately misleading”, the tribunal said in its decision .

The trader’s TradeMe advertising, Vehicle Offer and Sale Agreement, and Consumer Information Notice all described the vehicle as a 2005 model.

When asked, the trader produced to the tribunal the Japanese Export Certificate and Import Certificate which showed the vehicle arrived on April 3, 2013 and was described in both documents as a 2004 model.

“The trader could very easily have established the correct year of the vehicle as soon as the purchaser first raised the issue by referring to those documents but for reasons which were not explained to the tribunal, the trader continued to deny the vehicle was a 2004 model and insisted it was a 2005 model,” the tribunal said.

“Its conduct in that regard is indefensible and was deliberately misleading. The trader’s conduct was certainly the effective cause of the purchaser’s loss or damage.”

Real Wholesale Cars admitted its mistake and offered Zhang $500 as compensation, which Zhang said was unacceptable.

The tribunal instead ordered Real Wholesale Cars to pay $1,050 as compensation for misleading Zhang.

Zhang also claimed the vehicle was not of acceptable quality at the time of sale, with problems relating to the right hand rear wheel, windscreen wiper blades, drive belt transmission fluid, and air conditioning.

Real Wholesale Cars was also told to pay Zhang $711.54 for repair costs.


Car buying guide – Consumer NZ #car #servicing


#cars guide
#

Car buying guide

Everything you need to know about buying new and used cars

We explain the laws governing car sales, tell you how to deal with a dealer and how to decide if a car is worth buying. Plus reliable makes, car reviews and more.

When to trade up

Are regular trade-ups the smart thing to do?

It used to be that regular trade-ups of relatively new cars were the smart way to keep yourself on the road without paying too much in maintenance. But our surveys show cars are lasting way longer than they used to before the big repair bills kick in. So when should you buy a new one? Here’s our advice.

Around a third of a new car’s value will vanish by the end of the third year.

Run your car for as long as possible

One of the biggest costs of owning a car is depreciation, and the best way to minimise the effect of this is simple: keep your car longer. Around a third of a new car’s value will vanish by the end of the third year, and half by 5 years. Thereafter, if it’s a good car and you look after it, the rate slows down: by 10 years it will still hold around 20 percent of its value.

If you buy a 5-year-old car and keep it for 5 years, you’ll lose a lot less than buying new. You might want to run it even longer. The extra costs of replacing worn items in a well-maintained old car should still be a lot less than the depreciation on a new or near-new car. Shop around to keep repair costs down.

Watch for rust

The big warning sign is rust. Once rust takes hold, the car loses value rapidly and it is expensive to repair. If your car has rust, it could be time to sell.

The good news, though, is that rust is not the problem it used to be. Remember all those rusted-out doors and station-wagon tailgates in the 1980s? You don’t often see them now, because factory rust-prevention treatments are so much better.

Don’t worry about the odometer

Don’t worry about the odometer racking up large numbers. Once it clicks over 100,000 kilometres the distance travelled has less effect on the value. We hear of lots of cars that are still reliable at well over 200,000 kilometres.

Should you buy a new car?

Cars depreciate most during their first few years. That makes buying a new car and selling it after a few years a very expensive exercise. But many new cars can be bought at good discounts from the listed price. If you haggle hard to get a good discount and keep the car for at least 10 years, you will have the pleasure of buying a new car and you can ensure it is serviced regularly – so it should be reliable. Car safety improvements in recent years also means you will have a safer vehicle.

If buying new is not for you, then find a good car that has got past the worst part of the depreciation. But remember every time a car is sold, dealers take a chunk of profit. You pay that. Look for.

  • 2-3-year-old cars. They may have the remainder of the factory 3-year warranty, and are not too far behind in safety features.
  • Slightly older models, including Japanese imports, can be bought with factory-backed warranties under schemes run by the major car importers. The factory checks the cars, fixes any problems and sells them through dealer-approved schemes.
  • If your budget won’t stretch that far, look for well-maintained models 6 or more years old, even with over 100,000km on the clock.

Buy a reliable model

Pick from the models we recommend for reliability. For full details, see our Car reliability report.


Moore takes Hampton Downs Round win in BNT NZ Touring Cars #car #tv


#holden cars
#

Moore takes Hampton Downs Round win in BNT NZ Touring Cars

Monday, 30 November 2015, 11:43 am

Moore takes Hampton Downs Round win in BNT NZ Touring Cars

Auckland driver Richard Moore has starred in his debut of the BNT NZ Touring Cars at Hampton Downs this weekend by taking the Class one round win in his Holden Commodore.

The class one round podium rounded out by Simon Evans in second with Jason Bargwanna in third.

Moore notched up a third place in Saturday’s opening encounter in what was a rain affected race, as series leader Simon Evans speared off the track finishing well down the order.

Moore had actually won the race, before a post race investigation penalized eleven drivers for weaving across the track after the safety car lights had gone out following the Evans incident.

A 10-second penalty relegated Moore to third place, with Jason Bargwanna in his Toyota Camry promoted to the race win.

Race conditions for Sunday’s two races saw clear skies and hot conditions greet drivers at the north Waikato circuit, where Evans fought back claiming two wins, with Moore close behind with two-second place finishes.

Moore who worked doubly hard by also competing in the UDC V8 Ute series, taking the round win there also says the weekend result was the perfect way to get his ‘late’ championship campaign started.

“Unbelievable! I haven’t been in a car like this for 12 months. We won in the ute too, it was the perfect weekend really,” says Moore.

“Big thanks to our sponsor group GVI.kiwi, Mike Pero and DownForce Advanced Driver Training – without them we wouldn’t have been here this weekend.”

“It’s all about building the momentum now, keep the ball rolling. We’ll get some more sponsorship support between now and the next round and hopefully continue the fight up front when the championship heads to the South Island in the new year.”

Simon Evans still leads the championship on 564 points, with Bargwanna in second on 505, and young Australian driver Bryce Fullwood in third on 400 points.

Class two was won by Wellington’s Brock Cooley, his first round win of the season. Auckland’s Brad Lathrope taking second place ahead of Hamilton’s Simon Fleming who took third.

The trio capitalizing on the misfortune of class two championship leader Kevin Williams who struck trouble in race two of the weekend with a DNF.

For Cooley however, he was pleased to be able to convert car speed into solid results for championship campaign.

“The Speedy Signs Falcon has been quick all weekend and we made the most of it. We won the first two races and grabbed second in the last one. Very happy.”

“We’re now second in the championship, 24 points behind Kevin, bring on the next two rounds in the South Island.”

The BNT NZ Touring Cars now head to the South Island for the next two rounds. Ruapuna just outside of Christchurch January 16-17 followed by Teretonga near Invercargill January 23-24.


Car and Van Hire NZ #hdfc #car #loan


#rental cars
#

New Zealand’s Leading Rent a Car and Van Hire Services

A Kiwi Car Rental Legend

One of the most established car rental companies in New Zealand, Pegasus Rental Cars has been supplying clients with affordable and reliable hire cars since 1989. With vehicle fleets across 14 different locations in New Zealand, and a great range of rental deals, we make it easy for you to rent a car or van.

Leading the way for car rental companies throughout NZ

Our Aim

Our aim is to provide you with a quality vehicle that will allow you to make the most of our beautiful country. We strive to accommodate all of our clients’ needs by offering a range of services, extras, discounts, and deals that you won’t find at any other car rental companies in NZ.

Our Fleet

We offer a wide variety of van and car models for hire. In fact, we offer more range than any other rental companies in NZ! Whether you want a two-door hatchback, a station wagon, a 4WD, a van, or a minibus, we have a vehicle to suit your needs. All of our vehicles are reliable, fuel-efficient, and come with air conditioning. Check our rental deals page to snap up a bargain!

Airport Car Hire

Why waste even a minute of your time in New Zealand when you can rent with us and get your road trip underway as soon as your plane touches down. We offer airport pickup during business hours, shuttle and drop-off services from all of the major airports including Auckland. Christchurch. and Dunedin. Our pick up and drop off services may vary from branch to branch.

More reasons to hire a car or van from us


Car buying guide – Consumer NZ #sell #car #online


#cars guide
#

Car buying guide

Everything you need to know about buying new and used cars

We explain the laws governing car sales, tell you how to deal with a dealer and how to decide if a car is worth buying. Plus reliable makes, car reviews and more.

When to trade up

Are regular trade-ups the smart thing to do?

It used to be that regular trade-ups of relatively new cars were the smart way to keep yourself on the road without paying too much in maintenance. But our surveys show cars are lasting way longer than they used to before the big repair bills kick in. So when should you buy a new one? Here’s our advice.

Around a third of a new car’s value will vanish by the end of the third year.

Run your car for as long as possible

One of the biggest costs of owning a car is depreciation, and the best way to minimise the effect of this is simple: keep your car longer. Around a third of a new car’s value will vanish by the end of the third year, and half by 5 years. Thereafter, if it’s a good car and you look after it, the rate slows down: by 10 years it will still hold around 20 percent of its value.

If you buy a 5-year-old car and keep it for 5 years, you’ll lose a lot less than buying new. You might want to run it even longer. The extra costs of replacing worn items in a well-maintained old car should still be a lot less than the depreciation on a new or near-new car. Shop around to keep repair costs down.

Watch for rust

The big warning sign is rust. Once rust takes hold, the car loses value rapidly and it is expensive to repair. If your car has rust, it could be time to sell.

The good news, though, is that rust is not the problem it used to be. Remember all those rusted-out doors and station-wagon tailgates in the 1980s? You don’t often see them now, because factory rust-prevention treatments are so much better.

Don’t worry about the odometer

Don’t worry about the odometer racking up large numbers. Once it clicks over 100,000 kilometres the distance travelled has less effect on the value. We hear of lots of cars that are still reliable at well over 200,000 kilometres.

Should you buy a new car?

Cars depreciate most during their first few years. That makes buying a new car and selling it after a few years a very expensive exercise. But many new cars can be bought at good discounts from the listed price. If you haggle hard to get a good discount and keep the car for at least 10 years, you will have the pleasure of buying a new car and you can ensure it is serviced regularly – so it should be reliable. Car safety improvements in recent years also means you will have a safer vehicle.

If buying new is not for you, then find a good car that has got past the worst part of the depreciation. But remember every time a car is sold, dealers take a chunk of profit. You pay that. Look for.

  • 2-3-year-old cars. They may have the remainder of the factory 3-year warranty, and are not too far behind in safety features.
  • Slightly older models, including Japanese imports, can be bought with factory-backed warranties under schemes run by the major car importers. The factory checks the cars, fixes any problems and sells them through dealer-approved schemes.
  • If your budget won’t stretch that far, look for well-maintained models 6 or more years old, even with over 100,000km on the clock.

Buy a reliable model

Pick from the models we recommend for reliability. For full details, see our Car reliability report.