Why You Should NOT Buy a New Car – ReadyForZero Blog #rc #car


#what car should i buy
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Why You Should NOT Buy a New Car

17 Oct 2012 by Ben

Welcome to the 5th  Smart Money Debate at ReadyForZero . To see the other side  of this debate, read Miranda s post: Why You Should Buy a New Car (Not Used). And then let us know which argument was more convincing!

Buying new things is fun. I love unwrapping the shiny packaging, opening up the box, and smelling the factory made scent of something brand new. There is nothing quite like holding something in your hands that nobody else has ever used. It makes you feel well special.

You know what makes me feel even more special than buying something brand new? Saving money. That is why almost everything I purchase is used. Don t get me wrong I m not one to purchase a used pair of Hanes. However, with most items, you can find great deals if you are willing to buy used. This is especially true when it comes to major purchases like cars.

While I wouldn t recommend buying any old lemon, buying used cars is the only thing that makes sense financially. Our family has purchased new before, and we consider it to be one of the biggest financial mistakes we have ever made. Here is why we will never buy a new car again and neither should you!

Reason #1: New Cars Don t Hold Their Value

We ve all heard this before, but it bears repeating: a new car begins losing value the minute that you drive it off the lot. How much value you ask? According to Edmunds.com, a new car loses approximately 10% of its value as soon as you drive away. 10%. Furthermore, it loses about 20% of its value after the first year, and 10% off the original purchase price per year after that. Depending on the make and model of your new car, you may have lost up to 80% of the value from the purchase price within 5 years!

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Would you invest $25,000 in the stock market if you knew that you were going to lose $2,500 the moment you completed the transaction? Would you buy a house for $200,000 if you knew for a fact that it would only be worth $180,000 the minute you were handed the key and $160,000 a year later. Of course you wouldn t! No sane person would. Why would you do the same thing with a car? Let somebody take that huge financial hit by buying the new car. Then, you can take advantage of their silliness and buy the car used after they trade it in a few years later.

Reason #2: Used Cars are Cheaper

Since new cars are clearly a poor investment, it makes sense that the sticker price for used cars is far less expensive than the newer models. For instance, a brand new 2012 Toyota Prius is currently selling for around $28,500. Earlier this year, we were able to purchase a used 2009 Prius with under 25,000 miles for only $17,500. While red isn t exactly my favorite color, I was happy to suffer through it in order to save $11,000.

Reason #3: Less Worry

You know the nervous feeling that you get when you buy something new? You become very protective of it. You don t want anything to spill or scratch it. You re so proud of it that you want it to stay looking all brand new and shiny for forever. That is why you bought the product new in the first place. Afterall, what good is a new car if it doesn t actually look new.

I hate to tell you this, but eventually everything that is new is going to become blemished. When it does, you may be devastated especially if you spent as much money on it as you would a car. Why not save yourself all of that worry, headache, and stress? Just buy your cars used. A nick, dent, or scratch doesn t seem like such a big deal then.

Reason #4: Warranties are Available

People who tell you to buy a new car will tout the great warranties with which new cars come. Guess what. Most used cars will come with a warranty as well. In fact, the most important warranty the manufacturer s powertrain warranty should still be in effect as long as the car has not exceeded its age or mileage limits. This warranty covers all of the big stuff that might break like your engine or transmission. So, the warranty argument doesn t really hold water. If the warranty is in effect, the argument that you are going to have to pay for more repairs to a used car than you would for a new car doesn t really work either.

Reason #5: A New Car is a Bad Investment

Have I mentioned that a new car loses 10% of its value the moment you drive it off the lot and 20% of its value over the first year alone. Oh, I did? Good. Well, this is so important that I m mentioning it again. If that new car smell is still tempting you, go back and read Reason #1 to help snap you back into reality. Then, go out and buy a New Car Smell air freshener to put in your used car, and save yourself thousands of dollars.

As you can see, buying a new car is not the best decision for your finances. While that new car smell may make you feel like you are loaded, buying a new car is just another way of trying to look wealthy. It is a status symbol that savvy spenders can do without. If you re in the market for a new car, do yourself a favor and buy a used one instead.

No matter what you decide, use ReadyForZero to track your debt payoff it s a free online tool that helps you stay motivated and pay off your debt in the fastest time frame possible.

To see the other side  of this debate, read Miranda s post: Why You Should Buy a New Car (Not Used). And then let us know which argument was more convincing!

This post was published by Ben, Content Manager and Writer for » ReadyForZero. ReadyForZero is a company that helps people get out of debt on their own with a simple and free online tool that can automate and track your debt paydown.


Page Not Found #car #rental #singapore


#vehicle values
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  • Page Not Found #car #rental #london


    #my cars value
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  • 404 – PAGE NOT FOUND #car #buying


    #car camera
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    Why am I seeing this page?

    404 means the file is not found. If you have already uploaded the file then the name may be misspelled or it is in a different folder.

    Other Possible Causes

    You may get a 404 error for images because you have Hot Link Protection turned on and the domain is not on the list of authorized domains.

    If you go to your temporary url (http://ip/

    username/) and get this error, there maybe a problem with the rule set stored in an .htaccess file. You can try renaming that file to .htaccess-backup and refreshing the site to see if that resolves the issue.

    It is also possible that you have inadvertently deleted your document root or the your account may need to be recreated. Either way, please contact HostGator immediately via phone or live chat so we can diagnose the problem.

    Are you using WordPress? See the Section on 404 errors after clicking a link in WordPress.

    How to find the correct spelling and folder

    Missing or Broken Files

    When you get a 404 error be sure to check the URL that you are attempting to use in your browser.This tells the server what resource it should attempt to request.

    http://example.com/example/Example/help.html

    In this example the file must be in public_html/example/Example/

    Notice that the CaSe is important in this example. On platforms that enforce case-sensitivity e xample and E xample are not the same locations.

    For addon domains, the file must be in public_html/addondomain.com/example/Example/ and the names are case-sensitive.

    When you have a missing image on your site you may see a box on your page with with a red X where the image is missing. Right click on the X and choose Properties. The properties will tell you the path and file name that cannot be found.

    This varies by browser, if you do not see a box on your page with a red X try right clicking on the page, then select View Page Info, and goto the Media Tab.

    http://example.com/images/banner.PNG

    In this example the image file must be in public_html/images/

    Notice that the CaSe is important in this example. On platforms that enforce case-sensitivity PNG and png are not the same locations.

    404 Errors After Clicking WordPress Links

    When working with WordPress, 404 Page Not Found errors can often occur when a new theme has been activated or when the rewrite rules in the .htaccess file have been altered.


    Which 2013 cars (not SUVs) have all-wheel drive? #book #price #for #cars


    #awd cars
    #

    Which 2013 cars (not SUVs) have all-wheel drive?

    More than 60 all-wheel-drive cars are available for 2013, though all but six have base prices more than $30,000. Only one, the $18,665 Subaru Impreza, starts below $20,000. With the demise of Suzuki in the U.S. two of the less-expensive all-wheel-drive cars (the SX4 and Kizashi) are no longer produced, so there are fewer lower-priced choices.

    More than half of the all-wheel-drive cars are priced at more than $40,000, and the Lamborghini Aventador tops the price chart at $400,495.

    Below are 2013 all-wheel-drive cars broken down by price range (all prices include destination charges).

    Less Than $20,000

    • 2013 Subaru Impreza: $18,665

    $20,000 to $30,000

    • 2013 Subaru Legacy: $21,065
    • 2013 Mitsubishi Lancer SE: $21,090
    • 2013 Toyota Matrix: $23,210
    • 2013 Subaru Outback: $24,290
    • 2013 Subaru Impreza WRX: $26,565

    $30,000 to $40,000

    • 2013 Ford Taurus: $31,545
    • 2013 Audi A3: $31,745
    • 2013 Dodge Charger SXT: $32,490
    • 2013 Ford Fusion Titanium: $32,995
    • 2013 Chrysler 300: $33,640
    • 2013 Audi A4: $34,295
    • 2013 Volvo S60: $34,795
    • 2013 Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution: $35,490
    • 2013 VW Golf R: $35,590
    • 2013 Volvo XC70: $36,495
    • 2013 Buick LaCrosse: $36,930
    • 2013 Cadillac ATS: $37,795
    • 2013 Lexus IS 250: $38,240
    • 2013 Lincoln MKZ: $38,710
    • 2013 Audi A5: $38,745
    • 2013 Audi TT: $39,545
    • 2013 Chrysler 300C: $39,640
    • 2013 BMW 328: $39,745
    • 2013 Infiniti G37x: $39,855
    • 2013 Mercedes-Benz C-Class: $39,855

    $40,000 to $50,000

    • 2013 Acura TL: $40,350
    • 2013 Cadillac CTS: $41,700
    • 2013 Volkswagen CC: $42,660
    • 2013 Lexus IS 350: $43,675
    • 2013 Volvo S80: $44,045
    • 2013 Audi A6: $45,295
    • 2013 Lincoln MKS: $45,760
    • 2013 BMW 335: $46,045
    • 2013 Audi TTS: $48,245
    • 2013 Audi S4: $48,495

    $50,000 to $60,000

    • 2013 Lexus GS 350: $50,695
    • 2013 BMW 528: $50,995
    • 2013 Infiniti M37x: $51,755
    • 2013 Audi S5: $51,795
    • 2013 Cadillac XTS: $51,835
    • 2013 Mercedes-Benz E-Class: $54,405
    • 2013 BMW 535: $56,595
    • 2013 Audi TT RS: $58,095

    $60,000 to $70,000

    • 2013 Audi A7: $60,995
    • 2013 BMW 535 Gran Turismo: $61,495
    • 2013 Infiniti M56x: $64,605
    • 2013 BMW 550: $65,895

    $70,000 to $80,000

    • 2013 BMW 550 Gran Turismo: $70,995
    • 2013 Audi A8: $73,095
    • 2013 Mercedes-Benz CLS550: $75,405
    • 2013 Lexus LS 460: $75,830

    $80,000 and beyond

    • 2013 Porsche Panamera: $81,425
    • 2013 BMW 740: $81,495
    • 2013 BMW 750: $90,695
    • 2013 Mercedes-Benz S350: $93,905
    • 2013 Nissan GT-R: $97,820
    • 2013 Mercedes-Benz CL550: $116,205
    • 2013 Lexus LS 600h: $120,805
    • 2013 BMW Alpina B7: $131,995
    • 2013 Porsche 911: $138,450
    • 2013 Bentley Continental Flying Spur: $186,925
    • 2013 Bentley Continental GTC: $196,025
    • 2013 Lamborghini Gallardo Superleggara: $241,395
    • 2013 Bentley Continental Supersports: $294,625
    • 2013 Lamborghini Aventador: $400,495

    Page Not Found #used #car #search #engine


    #used car value calculator
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  • NADA: Used-Car Price Dip Not Sign of Overall Decline #very #cheap #car #insurance


    #used car prices nada
    #

    NADA: Used-Car Price Dip Not Sign of Overall Decline

    By Matt Schmitz

    June 12, 2013

    Despite May’s 2.1% month-over-month dip in the average price of used cars and light trucks — the largest in seven months — the National Automobile Dealers Association says the used-car market is stable. According to the June edition of the NADA Used Car Guide, the average trade-in price for used cars and light trucks up to 8 years old slipped only $57 to $15,263 in May compared with the same period a year ago.

    “A growing supply of 3-year-old vehicles is applying downward pressure on the prices of late-model vehicles,” Jonathan Banks, executive automotive analyst for the NADA Used Car Guide, said in a statement. That increase is, in part, due to increased fleet and lease sales after 2009, when new-vehicle sales hit a 30-year low with fewer trade-ins occurring, he said.

    Some markets have felt the squeeze of the higher supply more than others, Banks said. NADA estimates the late-model supply of midsize cars, as well as compact and luxury utility vehicles, has increased by an average of 16%, while the late-model supply for the overall market has increased by only half that amount. Trade-ins on midsize cars during the first five months of 2013 depreciated by 2.8% to $12,749, while overall market prices during the same period dipped by less than 2%, and prices for full-size pickup trucks increased 1%. Meanwhile, average prices of used luxury cars and utility vehicles have fallen 3.3% this year.

    Banks insists there is little evidence of substantial declines in the overall used-car market. “With gasoline prices holding steady and consumer sentiment at its highest level since 2007, we’re expecting an above-average performance in June,” he said.

    Used SUV Prices Increase in April as Luxury Cars Fall

    More Used-Car News on Cars.com


    Buying a Car with Bad Credit – What NOT to Do #car #rental #companies


    #buying a car with bad credit
    #

    Buying a Car with Bad Credit – What NOT to Do

    Don’t, and we mean don’t ever drive off the lot until your financing terms are set in stone. Drive your old clunker home or take the bus if the financing is not complete at day’s end.

    One common shady practice dealers engage in is to let you leave the lot with a contract that isn’t final. In this underhanded routine, you sign a financing agreement “subject to final approval” rather than a binding deal. The dealer then lets you take possession as though you had a binding agreement.

    You drive off happily in your new car, then get a phone call telling you that the financing wasn’t approved. You go back to the dealer and are then slapped with a much higher interest rate than you’d originally expected. This is a nasty trick. Don’t fall for it.

    Don’t rely on verbal assurances. Many people, especially those with bad credit, are hustled by dealer finance managers who smooth over ugly parts of a finance contract.

    One ConsumerAffairs.com reader wrote to us to say that a dealer first tricked her into making her roommate a co-signer, then left the two with a loan for which the roomie was primary borrower (overextending the roommate’s credit, tangling her legally and ruining the friendship). All along, the dealer had told our reader that the roomie was not being listed as the primary borrower. These kind of things can happen to you easily if you take someone’s word at finance closing time.

    Know the market. Don’t accept a finance contract without checking to see what the going interest rate is for your credit category. Dealers may try to psych you out by throwing out an extremely high interest rate number and insisting that’s the best they can do.

    The truth is, they’re tacking on several points of interest onto the loan over what the bank offers, and pocketing the difference. And the more desperate you seem, the higher interest number they’re likely to quote. While a dealer will almost certainly add some additional interest to the loan, you don’t have to let them get away with financial murder.

    To get a real-time snapshot of average car loan interest rates for your FICO score, use the loan calculator available at MyFICO.com. That way, you’ll have a good idea of whether the lender or dealer finance manager is in the ballpark.

    Skip the extras. Don’t sign up for add-ons like extended warranties, GAP insurance or credit life policies. They generally aren’t worth what you paid for them. And no matter what the dealers tell you, you are not legally required to purchase them.

    “The finance manager will state that these will only cost you an extra $5-20 per month, and that you’ll never miss it, but since you are paying interest on these rip-off insurances, it may cost you as much as $1,000 over the course of your loan,” says Richard Krawczyk, Ph.D. author of “Financial Aerobics – How to Get Your Finances into Shape.”

    Make sure you know whether your loan interest is precalculated. In far too many cases, people with bad credit end up with a loan where the interest is pre-calculated. When loans have pre-calculated interest, your payments may go solely to interest for as much as one-half of the life of the entire loan.

    Try to retire the loan early, even to refinance, and you may end up owing much more than you thought. Don’t get a rude shock — while you may be forced to take out such a loan, be very clear up front what you’re facing.

    Watch out for penalties. Know whether there’s a prepayment penalty written into your contract.

    Depending on how bad your credit is, you may want to go ahead and accept a loan that includes prepayment penalties. But be prepared: if you pay the loan off early, you may face an additional charge of $25 to $200. This may or may not be significant to you, but it’s best not to face any surprises at payoff time.


    Page Not Found – Official Honda Web Site #bell #car #insurance


    #price of used cars
    #

    [1] MSRP excluding tax, license, registration, $835.00 destination charge and options. Dealer prices may vary.

    [2] MSRP excluding tax, license, registration, $900.00 destination charge and options. Dealer prices may vary.

    [3] Subject to limited availability through September 2014 to residents of CA, OR, MA, RI, CT, NY, NJ, and MD on approved credit through American Honda Finance Corp. Closed end lease for 2014 Honda Fit EV for well-qualified lessees. Not all applicants will qualify. No purchase option at lease end. MSRP $37,415 (includes destination). Excludes tax, title, license, fees, registration, options and insurance. Total monthly payments $9,324. Lessee responsible for non-routine maintenance and excessive wear/tear. Lease includes collision coverage, routine maintenance, roadside assistance, unlimited mileage, and navigation system updates. Total due at lease signing is $259 plus tax and title and includes first month’s payment. Please see your authorized Fit EV dealer for complete details. For lessees who elect to install 240-volt charging equipment in their home, the charging equipment (hardware only) will be provided by Honda, the lessee remains responsible for installation and installation materials.


    Page Not Found #car #battery


    #price of used cars
    #

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