April 2015: Your Best New-Car Deals #car #insurance #quote


#best new car deals
#

April 2015: Your Best New-Car Deals

2015 Jeep Patriot

“Never pay retail” echoes the mantra of smart shoppers everywhere—and that definitely applies to most of the new vehicle market.

If you’re shopping for new wheels, chances are the models you’re considering are subject to incentives, rebates, or special finance programs.

With deals in mind, you could dock nearly 30 percent from the list price of some models, or more than five percent off a wide range of models—even before you push the salesperson on price flexibility.

Once again Fiat Chrysler’s lineup is incentive-heavy, with several of its crossovers—some with the Jeep badge—are an especially strong deal this month. The Nissan Leaf electric car still offers some strong incentives—true whether you buy or lease—and if you’re a pony-car fan, the new 2015 Ford Mustang is already getting in on the rebate action.

These deals are some of the best that there are for April 2015, as provided by our pricing-intelligence partner site, CarsDirect. As they differ by region and are subject to change, we recommend to visit the CarsDirect New Car Deals page for all the latest incentives information.

SUVs and crossovers

  • If you can qualify for all the rebates that CarsDirect notes on the 2015 Jeep Patriot Sport. you could cut a whopping 22.5 percent ($4,000) off its MSRP.—meaning that this base model could be as little as $13,790, if you can find one with no options at the dealership. FCA has the deals, as there are even higher rebates on the 2015 Jeep Compass Sport and the 2015 Dodge Journey SXT.
  • As the all-new 2015 Ford Edge is now arriving, they’re clearing out 2014 Ford Edge models, with maximum rebates of $4,750 that can apply.
  • The 2015 Ford Focus SE model is the heart of the lineup, and probably the version we’d choose if looking for the best value. And this month, with up to $4,250 off the sub-$20k sticker price, it’s an especially strong deal.
  • The 2015 Hyundai Sonata Hybrid has been carried over this year, while the rest of the 2015 Sonata lineup has been fully redesigned. That odd model-year cadence might work out in favor of deal-seekers, though, because you can now get a 2015 Sonata Hybrid Limited with a rebate of up to $5,000—which would knock the bottom line of this loaded hybrid to within a few hundred bucks of the base non-hybrid model.

Luxury sedans

  • While Buick might be considered a luxury (or premium) brand, it remains a bit conflicted in its identity here in the U.S. Case in point: There’s a rolling rebate on some of its models. For instance, you can get $2,750 off the $24,305 Buick Verano. making it no more than a comparably equipped version of the Chevy Cruze on which it’s based. Not all the 2014s have been cleared out, and there’s an even deeper discount there.
  • The Fiat 500 remains pretty heavily subsidized, and that could really work out in your favor if you’re eyeing this fashionable minicar. Up to $3,500 in rebates can apply to the 2015 Fiat 500 Pop is subject to up to $3,500 off.
  • Going electric might not cost nearly as much as you’d expected. The 2015 Nissan Leaf S has up to $8,750 in rebates if you’re buying one—and that’s not even counting the $7,500 federal tax credit that still applies. If you’re leasing one, by the way, Nissan is still offering a lease-cash deal that cuts your payment to $199 a month.

Pickup trucks

  • The 2015 Ram 1500 SLT 4×2 Regular Cab teases the best deal this month, as its total of $3,500 in rebates knocks more than eleven percent off the sticker price.
  • If you’re willing to climb up the Super Duty ladder, you can get some pretty great deals right now on 2015 Ford F-250 and F-350 trucks as well.

Best new-car values biggest bang for your buck – Consumer Reports #auto #sales


#value car
#

Our scores reveal which cars deliver the biggest bang for your buck

Some cars might be inexpensive but leave you feeling unsatisfied. They might not be good values, leaving you feeling as if you have overloaded on junk food. To help you steer clear of those empty calories, we compiled Consumer Reports’ best-value scores. They make it easy to identify which cars provide the most for your money and which ones could leave you feeling ripped off down the road.

To calculate our value Ratings, we analyzed more than 200 recently tested vehicles, focusing on road-test scores, predicted reliability, and five-year owner-cost estimates. The better a car performs in our tests and reliability Ratings, and the less it costs to own over time, the better its value. The best car represents about twice the value as the average car.

Hybrids generally did well in our analysis, especially the Toyota and Lexus hybrids and the Lincoln MKZ. None of them are a bargain, but they’re good values because they delight you with luxury or convenience at every turn, don’t require frequent trips to the dealer, and won’t soak your bank account every month.

This year’s best value is the Toyota Camry Hybrid. Smooth and capable—but not exciting—our model’s $29,000 as-tested price is affordable for the roominess, comfort, and all-around functionality it delivers. Its 38 mpg overall is impressive for a midsized sedan. And it’s stone-cold reliable. Which means that your dollar goes about twice as far with a Camry Hybrid as with the average-value car, according to our analysis.

Sure, you could buy the comparable Hyundai Sonata Hybrid for about $2,300 less than the Camry Hybrid XLE. But the Sonata’s jerky transitions from gas to electric irritated our testers. Its predicted reliability is less stellar than that of the Camry Hybrid. And its 33-mpg overall barely surpasses the best nonhybrid sedans, which cost less. In the end, the Sonata Hybrid represents merely an average value.

The bottom of the pack has a mix of expensive, unreliable German luxury sedans, big SUVs with voracious fuel appetites, and outdated and noncompetitive small Jeeps. But not all SUVs are poor values.

The complete story (available to online subscribers) digs deep into the data, and it is followed by more than a dozen charts detailing the findings, including projected cost per mile.


10 steps to a great deal on a new-car loan #car #posters


#car finance deals
#

Ch. 2: Your new-car dollar

Here are 10 tips to help you get the best auto loan:

1. Shop the loan separately from the car. Before starting negotiations on the exact car and price, begin the loan application process with credit unions, banks, well-respected online lenders and even your auto insurance company. “Generally, we’ve seen that online banks have been the best,” says Anthony Giorgianni, associate finance editor of “Consumer Reports Money Adviser” newsletter in Yonkers, N.Y. “The little banks might be very competitive,” he says. “A lot of them didn’t get caught up in the credit crunch.” And credit unions rates tend to be about 1 percent to 1.5 percent lower than banks, says Jim Hanson, a vice president at the Credit Union National Association in Madison, Wis.

You can get prequalification for a loan, which would enable you to go to the dealer with a blank check — good up to a specified amount, says Phil Reed, senior consumer advice editor for Edmunds.com. Once you have a solid, written contract with the dealer, only then ask if they can beat the financing deal you already have.

Shopping for a car or just a car loan? Download Bankrate’s auto app for price comparisons, loan calculations and more.

2. Limit your loan shopping to a two-week period. Every time you apply for a loan — whether you are approved, whether you use it — your credit score goes down and it makes it slightly more difficult to get a prime-rate loan. But if you make all of your applications within a two-week period, they count as only one inquiry.

3. Get familiar with your own credit history. Get free copies of your three credit reports, from Equifax, Experian and TransUnion at www.AnnualCreditReport.com. If you want to learn your exact scores from the three agencies, you can order them for a small fee from their individual Web sites. The credit or FICO score you buy is probably not the same one your lender uses, but it should be close. With an auto loan, you have a little more wiggle room in terms of your score. “What’s considered good for a car loan will be a little lower than what’s good for a mortgage,” says Gail Hillebrand, senior attorney with the San Francisco office of Consumers Union.

4. Shop the total loan amount, not the monthly payment. The only time you should consider the monthly payment is when you privately calculate how much you want to spend for your car. After that, don’t discuss monthly payments. Some lenders may focus on the payments to induce you to borrow more money by extending the number of months you pay. That way they make more in interest, and you have to drive your aging car longer.

5. Don’t assume the best. Lenders aren’t obligated to offer you the best rate for which you qualify. In 2007, car dealers marked up loans by an average 1.8 percent on used cars and 0.6 percent on new ones, according to Josh Frank, senior researcher for the Center for Responsible Lending in Durham, N.C. Let the lender know you’re shopping around or already have another offer. You’re more likely to see a better rate. You can find the best available auto loans in your area at Bankrate’s auto rate tables .


April 2015: Your Best New-Car Deals #car #loan #payment #calculator


#best new car deals
#

April 2015: Your Best New-Car Deals

2015 Jeep Patriot

“Never pay retail” echoes the mantra of smart shoppers everywhere—and that definitely applies to most of the new vehicle market.

If you’re shopping for new wheels, chances are the models you’re considering are subject to incentives, rebates, or special finance programs.

With deals in mind, you could dock nearly 30 percent from the list price of some models, or more than five percent off a wide range of models—even before you push the salesperson on price flexibility.

Once again Fiat Chrysler’s lineup is incentive-heavy, with several of its crossovers—some with the Jeep badge—are an especially strong deal this month. The Nissan Leaf electric car still offers some strong incentives—true whether you buy or lease—and if you’re a pony-car fan, the new 2015 Ford Mustang is already getting in on the rebate action.

These deals are some of the best that there are for April 2015, as provided by our pricing-intelligence partner site, CarsDirect. As they differ by region and are subject to change, we recommend to visit the CarsDirect New Car Deals page for all the latest incentives information.

SUVs and crossovers

  • If you can qualify for all the rebates that CarsDirect notes on the 2015 Jeep Patriot Sport. you could cut a whopping 22.5 percent ($4,000) off its MSRP.—meaning that this base model could be as little as $13,790, if you can find one with no options at the dealership. FCA has the deals, as there are even higher rebates on the 2015 Jeep Compass Sport and the 2015 Dodge Journey SXT.
  • As the all-new 2015 Ford Edge is now arriving, they’re clearing out 2014 Ford Edge models, with maximum rebates of $4,750 that can apply.
  • The 2015 Ford Focus SE model is the heart of the lineup, and probably the version we’d choose if looking for the best value. And this month, with up to $4,250 off the sub-$20k sticker price, it’s an especially strong deal.
  • The 2015 Hyundai Sonata Hybrid has been carried over this year, while the rest of the 2015 Sonata lineup has been fully redesigned. That odd model-year cadence might work out in favor of deal-seekers, though, because you can now get a 2015 Sonata Hybrid Limited with a rebate of up to $5,000—which would knock the bottom line of this loaded hybrid to within a few hundred bucks of the base non-hybrid model.

Luxury sedans

  • While Buick might be considered a luxury (or premium) brand, it remains a bit conflicted in its identity here in the U.S. Case in point: There’s a rolling rebate on some of its models. For instance, you can get $2,750 off the $24,305 Buick Verano. making it no more than a comparably equipped version of the Chevy Cruze on which it’s based. Not all the 2014s have been cleared out, and there’s an even deeper discount there.
  • The Fiat 500 remains pretty heavily subsidized, and that could really work out in your favor if you’re eyeing this fashionable minicar. Up to $3,500 in rebates can apply to the 2015 Fiat 500 Pop is subject to up to $3,500 off.
  • Going electric might not cost nearly as much as you’d expected. The 2015 Nissan Leaf S has up to $8,750 in rebates if you’re buying one—and that’s not even counting the $7,500 federal tax credit that still applies. If you’re leasing one, by the way, Nissan is still offering a lease-cash deal that cuts your payment to $199 a month.

Pickup trucks

  • The 2015 Ram 1500 SLT 4×2 Regular Cab teases the best deal this month, as its total of $3,500 in rebates knocks more than eleven percent off the sticker price.
  • If you’re willing to climb up the Super Duty ladder, you can get some pretty great deals right now on 2015 Ford F-250 and F-350 trucks as well.

10 Best New-Car Deals For May 2015 #muscle #cars #for #sale


#best new car deals
#

10 Best New-Car Deals For May 2015

Chevy Spark–one of the top deals

IRVINE, CA — May 14, 2015: Kelley Blue Book has assembled its list of the 10 best lease, financing and cash back deals for new cars available in May from a variety of auto manufacturers.

“This month’s list of standout deals includes everything from a pickup truck to more than one electric car, along with a few sedans to even out the mix. Topping the list is an SUV alternative offering loads of charm and just as much cash back,” said Jack R. Nerad, executive editorial director and executive market analyst for Kelley Blue Book’s KBB.com. “While KBB.com’s list of the 10 Best Deals of the Month showcases offers that are available throughout the entire month, many car shoppers can strike a great deal during holiday weekend sales events like during the upcoming Memorial Day long weekend.”

Below are the KBB.com editors’ picks for standout new-car lease, financing and cash back deals, all available at least through June 1, 2015:


Best new-car values biggest bang for your buck – Consumer Reports #remote #control #car


#value car
#

Our scores reveal which cars deliver the biggest bang for your buck

Some cars might be inexpensive but leave you feeling unsatisfied. They might not be good values, leaving you feeling as if you have overloaded on junk food. To help you steer clear of those empty calories, we compiled Consumer Reports’ best-value scores. They make it easy to identify which cars provide the most for your money and which ones could leave you feeling ripped off down the road.

To calculate our value Ratings, we analyzed more than 200 recently tested vehicles, focusing on road-test scores, predicted reliability, and five-year owner-cost estimates. The better a car performs in our tests and reliability Ratings, and the less it costs to own over time, the better its value. The best car represents about twice the value as the average car.

Hybrids generally did well in our analysis, especially the Toyota and Lexus hybrids and the Lincoln MKZ. None of them are a bargain, but they’re good values because they delight you with luxury or convenience at every turn, don’t require frequent trips to the dealer, and won’t soak your bank account every month.

This year’s best value is the Toyota Camry Hybrid. Smooth and capable—but not exciting—our model’s $29,000 as-tested price is affordable for the roominess, comfort, and all-around functionality it delivers. Its 38 mpg overall is impressive for a midsized sedan. And it’s stone-cold reliable. Which means that your dollar goes about twice as far with a Camry Hybrid as with the average-value car, according to our analysis.

Sure, you could buy the comparable Hyundai Sonata Hybrid for about $2,300 less than the Camry Hybrid XLE. But the Sonata’s jerky transitions from gas to electric irritated our testers. Its predicted reliability is less stellar than that of the Camry Hybrid. And its 33-mpg overall barely surpasses the best nonhybrid sedans, which cost less. In the end, the Sonata Hybrid represents merely an average value.

The bottom of the pack has a mix of expensive, unreliable German luxury sedans, big SUVs with voracious fuel appetites, and outdated and noncompetitive small Jeeps. But not all SUVs are poor values.

The complete story (available to online subscribers) digs deep into the data, and it is followed by more than a dozen charts detailing the findings, including projected cost per mile.


10 steps to a great deal on a new-car loan #car #rental #coupons


#car finance deals
#

Ch. 2: Your new-car dollar

Here are 10 tips to help you get the best auto loan:

1. Shop the loan separately from the car. Before starting negotiations on the exact car and price, begin the loan application process with credit unions, banks, well-respected online lenders and even your auto insurance company. “Generally, we’ve seen that online banks have been the best,” says Anthony Giorgianni, associate finance editor of “Consumer Reports Money Adviser” newsletter in Yonkers, N.Y. “The little banks might be very competitive,” he says. “A lot of them didn’t get caught up in the credit crunch.” And credit unions rates tend to be about 1 percent to 1.5 percent lower than banks, says Jim Hanson, a vice president at the Credit Union National Association in Madison, Wis.

You can get prequalification for a loan, which would enable you to go to the dealer with a blank check — good up to a specified amount, says Phil Reed, senior consumer advice editor for Edmunds.com. Once you have a solid, written contract with the dealer, only then ask if they can beat the financing deal you already have.

Shopping for a car or just a car loan? Download Bankrate’s auto app for price comparisons, loan calculations and more.

2. Limit your loan shopping to a two-week period. Every time you apply for a loan — whether you are approved, whether you use it — your credit score goes down and it makes it slightly more difficult to get a prime-rate loan. But if you make all of your applications within a two-week period, they count as only one inquiry.

3. Get familiar with your own credit history. Get free copies of your three credit reports, from Equifax, Experian and TransUnion at www.AnnualCreditReport.com. If you want to learn your exact scores from the three agencies, you can order them for a small fee from their individual Web sites. The credit or FICO score you buy is probably not the same one your lender uses, but it should be close. With an auto loan, you have a little more wiggle room in terms of your score. “What’s considered good for a car loan will be a little lower than what’s good for a mortgage,” says Gail Hillebrand, senior attorney with the San Francisco office of Consumers Union.

4. Shop the total loan amount, not the monthly payment. The only time you should consider the monthly payment is when you privately calculate how much you want to spend for your car. After that, don’t discuss monthly payments. Some lenders may focus on the payments to induce you to borrow more money by extending the number of months you pay. That way they make more in interest, and you have to drive your aging car longer.

5. Don’t assume the best. Lenders aren’t obligated to offer you the best rate for which you qualify. In 2007, car dealers marked up loans by an average 1.8 percent on used cars and 0.6 percent on new ones, according to Josh Frank, senior researcher for the Center for Responsible Lending in Durham, N.C. Let the lender know you’re shopping around or already have another offer. You’re more likely to see a better rate. You can find the best available auto loans in your area at Bankrate’s auto rate tables .


Best new-car values biggest bang for your buck – Consumer Reports #car #sales #websites


#value car
#

Our scores reveal which cars deliver the biggest bang for your buck

Some cars might be inexpensive but leave you feeling unsatisfied. They might not be good values, leaving you feeling as if you have overloaded on junk food. To help you steer clear of those empty calories, we compiled Consumer Reports’ best-value scores. They make it easy to identify which cars provide the most for your money and which ones could leave you feeling ripped off down the road.

To calculate our value Ratings, we analyzed more than 200 recently tested vehicles, focusing on road-test scores, predicted reliability, and five-year owner-cost estimates. The better a car performs in our tests and reliability Ratings, and the less it costs to own over time, the better its value. The best car represents about twice the value as the average car.

Hybrids generally did well in our analysis, especially the Toyota and Lexus hybrids and the Lincoln MKZ. None of them are a bargain, but they’re good values because they delight you with luxury or convenience at every turn, don’t require frequent trips to the dealer, and won’t soak your bank account every month.

This year’s best value is the Toyota Camry Hybrid. Smooth and capable—but not exciting—our model’s $29,000 as-tested price is affordable for the roominess, comfort, and all-around functionality it delivers. Its 38 mpg overall is impressive for a midsized sedan. And it’s stone-cold reliable. Which means that your dollar goes about twice as far with a Camry Hybrid as with the average-value car, according to our analysis.

Sure, you could buy the comparable Hyundai Sonata Hybrid for about $2,300 less than the Camry Hybrid XLE. But the Sonata’s jerky transitions from gas to electric irritated our testers. Its predicted reliability is less stellar than that of the Camry Hybrid. And its 33-mpg overall barely surpasses the best nonhybrid sedans, which cost less. In the end, the Sonata Hybrid represents merely an average value.

The bottom of the pack has a mix of expensive, unreliable German luxury sedans, big SUVs with voracious fuel appetites, and outdated and noncompetitive small Jeeps. But not all SUVs are poor values.

The complete story (available to online subscribers) digs deep into the data, and it is followed by more than a dozen charts detailing the findings, including projected cost per mile.