Nissan Leaf electric car goes further with one-pedal driving – BBC News, leaf car.#Leaf #car


Nissan Leaf electric car goes further with one-pedal driving

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    Leaf car

    Nissan has launched a longer-range version of its best-selling Leaf electric vehicle, as it fights growing competition in the electric car market.

    The new Leaf can travel about 50% further on a single charge than its predecessor, according to the firm.

    But it still falls short of the ranges offered by other recent electric cars from Tesla and General Motors.

    Other updates include a new one-pedal driving system, auto-parking tech and a more modern design.

    More than 283,000 Leaf cars have been sold since the Japanese firm launched the brand in 2010, making it the world’s most purchased electric car.

    However, it is facing increasing competition in the fast-developing “green” car market, fuelled in part by tightening emissions standards around the world.

    “The general industry standard for model cycles is around six-to-seven years, so the launch of the second generation Leaf falls neatly in to this timeframe,” commented Ian Fletcher, principal automotive analyst at the IHS Markit consultancy.

    “However, the next three to four years looks set to see further upgraded and brand new vehicles, and manufacturers in this space still have everything to play for.”

    What’s new?

    The new Leaf, on sale in Japan from October and elsewhere early next year, has a longer range thanks to a bigger 40 kilowatt hour (kWh) battery.

    Because different territories have different tests for electric vehicles, the new Leaf’s quoted range varies according to where it will be sold:

    • in Europe it is 378km (235 miles)
    • in Japan it is 400km (248 miles)
    • in the US it is 241km (150 miles)

    Electric cars tend to achieve about 20-25% below the European quoted figures in real-world tests.

    However, Nissan says the introduction of a one-pedal system – in which a button press turns the accelerator pad into an “e-Pedal” that can start, accelerate, brake and stop the vehicle – will provide added energy efficiency gains.

    Motorists can, however, drive with both a separate accelerator and brake pedal if they prefer.

    Chris Lilly, content manager for the Next Green Car news site, said while the new model was not “groundbreaking” it should be more appealing to drivers.

    “It takes every element of the old Leaf and improves upon it, and adds a whole lot of new features,” he said.

    Leaf car

    Those improvements also include an automated parking system, called ProPilot Park, that will take control of the vehicle to manoeuvre it into tricky spaces.

    The system can handle parallel parking, according to the firm, and can deal with up to seven-point turns. Drivers can also use dashboard controls to make adjustments to the parking spot in advance if they feel it is necessary.

    The model also automates single-lane highway driving.

    Prices will start at 3,150,360 yen (£22,220), Nissan said. The Japanese carmaker said it would offer a higher priced model, with greater power and range, next year.

    How it compares

    Competition in the electric vehicle market is intensifying as major automakers join specialised manufacturers to develop high-tech, low-emission cars.

    “Electric vehicle technology is advancing rapidly – costs are falling quickly and range is improving,” said Prof David Bailey, an automobile expert at Aston Business School.

    But despite boosting its range, rival models can go further than Nissan’s latest offering.

    The Tesla Model 3 can run between 354km to 499km (220 to 310 miles), according to US tests. It starts at $35,000 (£26,850).

    General Motor’s Chevy Bolt – which is rebadged as the Opel Ampera E in parts of Europe – has a quoted range of 238 miles (383 km), according to the same measurement system. It starts at about $38,000 (£29,150).

    US automaker Tesla is one of the pioneers in the electric vehicle industry and despite recently releasing its cheapest model to date, it has traditionally catered to the premium end of the market.

    The Nissan Leaf faces more direct competition from models including the Volkswagen e-Golf, BMW i3 and Hyundai’s Ioniq.

    “The Leaf is not going to challenge Tesla,” Next Green Car’s Mr Lilly said. “But the Leaf has price and manufacturing capacity on its side.”

    “You’re getting a lot less range but you’re paying a lot less,” he said.

    Analysis:

    Richard Westcott, Transport correspondent

    Something’s definitely changed since VW was caught fiddling its diesel emissions tests in the US.

    Car companies are accelerating plans for electric vehicles. Volvo says that after 2019, every new model will have some sort of electric engine on board. Jaguar’s launching a rather gorgeous rival to the Tesla.

    But big problems still remain.

    Every significant journey needs planning. Someone at work (no names) tried to get to England’s West Country in his new electric car last week, and didn’t check the charge points properly. The first two were broken – he had not checked their status online in advance.

    Electric cars are also expensive. They are hard to charge if you live in a terraced house and there are worries about the impact a sudden rise in people charging cars could have on the national grid.

    Diesel and petrol cars work because they are so convenient. Go anywhere. Fill up in minutes. And they can be very cheap to buy. Electric cars aren’t nearly there yet.

    Electric future

    Nissan was one of the first automakers to market an electric vehicle to the masses when it launched the first Leaf in 2010. The Leaf became the world’s biggest-selling, all-battery car, with more than 280,000 units sold.

    Despite heavy investment, electric vehicles still represent only a fraction of conventional vehicle sales.

    Just over two million electric vehicles were registered worldwide as of 2016, according to the International Energy Agency, just a slice of the more than 80 million vehicles sold last year.

    One big opportunity is China. Automakers are jostling for a piece of the world’s biggest car market ahead of the introduction of new rules designed to fight pollution.

    China wants electric battery cars and plug-in hybrids to account for at least one-fifth of its vehicle sales by 2025.

    European production of the last-generation Leaf has taken place in Sunderland, which has produced more than 70,000 of the electric vehicles.

    A spokesman for Nissan told the BBC the firm had yet to announce where the new version would be produced.



    Nissan Leaf Electric Car: Ultimate Guide, What You Need To Know, leaf car.#Leaf #car


    Nissan Leaf Electric Car: Ultimate Guide, What You Need To Know

    Leaf car

    2015 Nissan Leaf

    Back in December 2010, an unassuming compact hatchback hit the Japanese and American markets.

    A new small Nissan isn’t normally the cause for fanfares and celebration, but the Leaf is one of the most significant cars of recent years–as it’s a competitive, usable electric car.

    Whether you love or hate the Leaf, it’s playing a part in both turning electric cars into a mainstream product, and showing that a large car company really can put an electric vehicle into mass production.

    We’ve been covering the Leaf since its early days, and we’ve now brought together a guide that covers all aspects of the car, from pre-launch to the experiences of owners, two years down the line.

    There are plenty of links to go through, but we’ve split our guide into categories so you can find the story you’re looking for a little easier. You’ll find driving impressions on this page, ownership experiences on page 2, pricing, sales and production data on page 3, general and battery loss information on the fourth page, and page five is reserved for the more offbeat Leaf stories.

    Leaf basics: Driving the Leaf

    So what is the Nissan Leaf? Put simply, it’s a five-door, five-seat hatchback which sits in the compact class, next to conventionally-powered rivals like the Toyota Corolla and Honda Civic.

    It uses a 24 kilowatt-hour lithium-ion battery pack, which feeds power to an 80 kilowatt (110-horsepower) and 210 pound-foot electric motor. Official performance data is hard to come by, but the benchmark 0-60mph sprint has been variously recorded between 10 and 12 seconds, and top speed is around 90 mph. Official EPA range is 84 miles for the 2015 car, and 114 MPGe.

    Pricing starts at $29,860 for the 2015 Leaf, including a mandatory $850 delivery fee.

    You can head over to our sister site, The Car Connection, for a review of the 2015 Nissan Leaf.

    We’ve also driven the Leaf on several occasions here at Green Car Reports, and you can click through our experiences below:

    The 2011 Nissan Leaf has also been a previous nominee–and winner–of Green Car Reports’ Best Car To Buy



    Nissan Leaf Electric Car: Ultimate Guide, What You Need To Know, leaf car.#Leaf #car


    Nissan Leaf Electric Car: Ultimate Guide, What You Need To Know

    Leaf car

    2015 Nissan Leaf

    Back in December 2010, an unassuming compact hatchback hit the Japanese and American markets.

    A new small Nissan isn’t normally the cause for fanfares and celebration, but the Leaf is one of the most significant cars of recent years–as it’s a competitive, usable electric car.

    Whether you love or hate the Leaf, it’s playing a part in both turning electric cars into a mainstream product, and showing that a large car company really can put an electric vehicle into mass production.

    We’ve been covering the Leaf since its early days, and we’ve now brought together a guide that covers all aspects of the car, from pre-launch to the experiences of owners, two years down the line.

    There are plenty of links to go through, but we’ve split our guide into categories so you can find the story you’re looking for a little easier. You’ll find driving impressions on this page, ownership experiences on page 2, pricing, sales and production data on page 3, general and battery loss information on the fourth page, and page five is reserved for the more offbeat Leaf stories.

    Leaf basics: Driving the Leaf

    So what is the Nissan Leaf? Put simply, it’s a five-door, five-seat hatchback which sits in the compact class, next to conventionally-powered rivals like the Toyota Corolla and Honda Civic.

    It uses a 24 kilowatt-hour lithium-ion battery pack, which feeds power to an 80 kilowatt (110-horsepower) and 210 pound-foot electric motor. Official performance data is hard to come by, but the benchmark 0-60mph sprint has been variously recorded between 10 and 12 seconds, and top speed is around 90 mph. Official EPA range is 84 miles for the 2015 car, and 114 MPGe.

    Pricing starts at $29,860 for the 2015 Leaf, including a mandatory $850 delivery fee.

    You can head over to our sister site, The Car Connection, for a review of the 2015 Nissan Leaf.

    We’ve also driven the Leaf on several occasions here at Green Car Reports, and you can click through our experiences below:

    The 2011 Nissan Leaf has also been a previous nominee–and winner–of Green Car Reports’ Best Car To Buy



    2015 Nissan Leaf Reviews, Pictures and Prices #car #finder #philippines


    #leaf car
    #

    Nissan Leaf Review

    Research Other Years

    Critics think the all-electric 2015 Nissan Leaf has composed handling and a spacious interior, but they say it could use more power for passing on the highway.

    The 2015 Nissan Leaf is ranked:

    The 2015 Nissan Leaf is powered by an electric motor, and many test drivers say it delivers good acceleration from a stop. However, some reviewers report that the Leaf can struggle to overtake other cars at highway speeds. Test drivers like that, at speed, the Leaf is especially smooth and practically silent. The EPA reports that the Leaf gets 126/101 mpg-equivalent city/highway, which is good for an electric car. The Leaf can travel 84 miles on a fully charged battery, and some critics note that the Leaf s driving range may limit its appeal to some shoppers. Reviewers report that the Leaf has an agile ride, communicative steering and feels stable while cornering. Critics add that the Leaf s firm brake pedal provides excellent feedback.

    More Photos

    Low-rent plastics line the 2015 Nissan Leaf’s interior, auto journalists write, but they like the cabin’s contemporary styling. Critics say the Leaf feels roomy on the inside and offers exceptional outward visibility. They add that the front seats are spacious, and a few find the rear seats roomier than those found in many compact cars. The Leaf s cargo space is good for an electric car. Standard features on the 2015 Nissan Leaf include Bluetooth, automatic climate control, satellite radio, a USB port and a rearview camera. Optional features include navigation, a seven-speaker Bose audio system and Nissan s Around View Monitor, which uses multiple cameras to give a 360-degree view around the vehicle when parking.

      “The 2015 Nissan Leaf possesses everything necessary to placate environmentalists, technophiles and any forward-thinking consumers looking to cut back on high fuel bills.” — AutoTrader “Overall, we think the pioneering Leaf continues to be a great choice and a good value for an EV.” — Edmunds “While it has a limited driving range, in most other respects the Leaf is quite similar to a conventional gas-powered compact hatchback, offering a comfortable interior and surprisingly snappy acceleration (albeit with zero emissions).” — Left Lane News “If you have an unpredictable driving schedule, travel more than 100 miles per day or live in a residence without 220-volt power support, better options are the Chevrolet Volt, Toyota Prius Plug-in or Ford C-Max Energi. These plug-in hybrids can travel hundreds of miles thanks to their onboard gasoline engines.” — Kelley Blue Book (2014)

    Other Cars to Consider

    The Chevrolet Spark EV has a slightly lower base price than the Leaf, and it gets a marginally better mpg-e rating. Critics agree that the Spark EV feels powerful and responsive off the line, and many appreciate its nimble handling and excellent maneuverability.

    The Toyota Prius Plug-in can t travel as far on a charge, but its hybrid powertrain means that you don t have to worry about running out of battery power. The Prius Plug-in also offers terrific fuel economy for a hybrid car, and reviewers like its spacious cargo hold.

    Details: 2015 Nissan Leaf

    The 2015 Nissan Leaf is a five-seat, front-wheel drive hatchback that is powered by an electric motor. It comes in S, SV and SL trims. The Leaf hasn t been fully redesigned since its debut in the 2011 model year. As a result, this overview uses applicable research and reviews from the 2011 through 2015 model years.



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    Molecular Expressions: Science, Optics and You – Secret Worlds: The Universe Within – Interactive Flash Tutorial #microscopy, #photomicrography, #science, #education, #optics, #tutorials, #powers #of #10, #photography, #flash, #orders #of #magnitude, #exponential #notation, #milky #way, #space, #solar #system, #earth, #moon, #planets, #leaf, #tree, #tallahassee, #national #high #magnetic #field #laboratory, #plant, #cell, #nucleus, #chromatin, #dna, #carbon, #proton, #electrons


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    Secret Worlds: The Universe Within

    View the Milky Way at 10 million light years from the Earth. Then move through space towards the Earth in successive orders of magnitude until you reach a tall oak tree just outside the buildings of the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory in Tallahassee, Florida. After that, begin to move from the actual size of a leaf into a microscopic world that reveals leaf cell walls, the cell nucleus, chromatin, DNA and finally, into the subatomic universe of electrons and protons.

    Once the tutorial has completely downloaded, a set of the arrows will appear that allow the user to increase or decrease the view magnitude in Manual mode. Click on the Auto button to return to the Automatic mode.

    Notice how each picture is actually an image of something that is 10 times bigger or smaller than the one preceding or following it. The number that appears on the lower right just below each image is the size of the object in the picture. On the lower left is the same number written in powers of ten, or exponential notation . Exponential notation is a convenient way for scientists to write very large or very small numbers. For example, compare the size of the Earth to the size of a plant cell, which is a trillion times smaller:

    Earth = 12.76 x 10 +6 = 12,760,000 meters wide
    (12.76 million meters)

    Plant Cell = 12.76 x 10 -6 = 0.00001276 meters wide
    (12.76 millionths of a meter)

    Scientists examine things in particular ways using a combination of very sophisticated equipment, everyday instruments, and many unlikely tools. Some phenomena that scientists want to observe are so tiny that they need a magnifying glass, or even a microscope. Other things are so far away that a powerful telescope must be used in order to see them. It is important to understand and be able to compare the size of things we are studying. To learn more about the relative sizes of things, visit our Perspectives: Powers of 10 activity site.

    Note: – The sequence of images in this tutorial has been optimized for maximum visual impact. Due to the fact that discrete exponential increments are not always the most convenient interval for illustrating this concept, our artists and programmers have made dimensional approximations in some cases. As a consequence, the relative size and positioning of several objects in the tutorial reflect this fact.

    The original concept underlying this tutorial was advanced by Dutch engineer and educator Kees Boeke, who first utilized powers to aid in visualization of large numbers in a 1957 publication entitled “Cosmic View, the Universe in 40 Jumps “. Several years later, in 1968, architect Charles Eames, along with his wife Ray, directed a “rough sketch” film of the same concept and finally completed the work (entitled the “Powers of Ten “) with the assistance of Philip Morrison in 1977. Other notable contributors to this effort include Philip’s wife Phylis, who has assisted in translation of the concept into several beautifully illustrated books that are currently still available through the booksellers.

    Purchase Nikon’s Small World 2017 Calendar – The Nikon Small World 2017 Calendar is printed in full color on 8.5 x 11 semi-gloss paper and spiral bound for mounting on the wall. Included in the calendar are the top 20 prize winners and thumbnail images from all of the 15 honorable mentions. Winning entries included neurons, Quantum Dot crystals, plant tissues and fibers, cells in culture, recrystallized chemicals, animal tissue sections, a tapeworm, and several microscopic invertebrates. This year’s contest drew entrants from over 50 countries, as well as from a diverse range of academic and professional disciplines. Winners came from such fields as chemistry, biology, materials research, botany, and biotechnology.

    David A. Hahn. Christopher A. Burdett and Michael W. Davidson – National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, 1800 East Paul Dirac Dr. The Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida, 32310.

    Questions or comments? Send us an email.

    ?>


    2014 Nissan Leaf Hatchback Review #cheap #rent #a #car


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    2014 Nissan Leaf Hatchback

    Edmunds’ Review

    Edmunds Expert Review of the 2014 Nissan Leaf Hatchback

    What’s New for 2014

    A rearview camera is now standard on all 2014 Nissan Leaf models. Also, the Leaf’s EPA-estimated driving range has increased from 75 to 84 miles. This is due to the way the EPA calculates range, however, as the Leaf’s battery and drive systems are unchanged.

    Introduction

    Electric vehicles are no longer just a novelty for automakers to showcase their vision of the future. They’ve finally broken into the mainstream, and leading the charge (pun intended) for four years running is the Nissan Leaf. Thanks to its regular-car driving experience, reasonable pricing and pioneering status, the Leaf has convinced more than 100,000 buyers worldwide to make the leap to EV ownership. There are some drawbacks, yes, but short of spending three times as much for a Tesla Model S, the 2014 Nissan Leaf represents a top pick among all-electric vehicles.

    The main concern for those looking to make the switch to electricity is range. The Nissan Leaf’s 84-mile EPA-estimated range might not seem like a lot, but it’s enough to accomplish almost any daily-use task and ranks as one of the highest in its class. Notably, this 84-mile rating is higher than the 2013 Leaf’s 75-mile range. The car’s electrical hardware hasn’t changed, but Nissan deleted the Leaf’s former in-car software option to charge the battery to only 80 percent capacity (which helped prolong long-term battery life). Previously, the EPA was blending both the 80 percent and 100 percent battery capacities into its rating, so the 2014 estimate is a more accurate (and more marketable) number.

    When it comes time to recharge the battery, how long it takes will depend on which trim level of Leaf you buy. The base S trim comes with a slower 3.3 kW onboard charger, but all others have the quicker (and recommended) 6.6 kW charger. With this upgraded charger hooked up to a 240-volt station, a full charge takes about four hours, which should easily fit into most drivers’ daily routine. The Leaf is also rare in that it offers an optional quick-charge port. In conjunction with a special high-capacity power source, it allows you to charge the battery to 80 percent capacity in a claimed 30 minutes.

    Inside, the Leaf shows flashes of cutting-edge technology, but you don’t need to be an early adopter to figure out how to operate its various bells and whistles. The cabin is also pleasantly roomy and comfortable, with enough cargo space to handle errands with ease. With public charging stations becoming more prevalent, the Nissan Leaf truly is an EV that doesn’t require much sacrifice.

    Since the Leaf’s introduction, the EV market has gained a handful of similarly priced entries. Of these, the 2014 Ford Focus Electric has risen to become the most significant alternative. It boasts a little more power than the Leaf and sharper handling, but its EPA estimated range is less, at 76 miles. The 2014 Chevrolet Spark EV and 2014 Fiat 500e are also appealing, but they’re not as roomy and they’re only on sale in a few states. All things considered, we think the 2014 Nissan Leaf is a great choice for an EV.

    No Video Content

    Body Styles, Trim Levels, and Options

    The all-electric 2014 Nissan Leaf is a four-door hatchback available in three trim levels: S, SV and SL. Standard features for the base S model include a 3.3 kW onboard charger, 16-inch steel wheels, heated mirrors, full power accessories, keyless ignition and entry, automatic climate control, a trip computer, heated front and rear seats, cloth upholstery, a six-way manually adjustable driver seat (four-way front passenger seat), 60/40-split-folding rear seats, a tilt-only heated steering wheel, Bluetooth phone connectivity, a 4.3-inch color touchscreen, a rearview camera and a four-speaker CD player with iPod/USB input and satellite radio.

    Stepping up to the SV trim gets you a 6.6 kW charger, a B-mode transmission setting for enhanced regenerative braking, alloy wheels, a navigation system with a larger 7-inch touchscreen, Nissan’s Carwings telematics to remotely monitor and manage charging and climate control, a more efficient heating system for better range in cold weather, cruise control, an auto-dimming rearview mirror, partially recycled cloth upholstery and a six-speaker audio system with Pandora integration for iPhones.

    The range-topping SL trim adds 17-inch alloy wheels, automatic LED headlights, foglights, a quick-charger port, a solar panel mounted on the rear spoiler to help power accessories, leather upholstery and a cargo cover.

    Options are sparse and grouped into packages. The S model can add the 6.6 kW charger with the quick-charge port, and the SV can be upgraded with the automatic LED headlights, foglights and quick-charge port. Both SV and SL models are eligible for the Premium package that adds a seven-speaker Bose stereo and a 360-degree parking camera system.

    Powertrains and Performance

    The front-wheel-drive 2014 Nissan Leaf is powered by an 80-kilowatt electric motor (107 horsepower and 187 pound-feet of torque). The system utilizes a 24 kWh lithium-ion battery pack. In Edmunds performance testing, a Leaf accelerated from zero to 60 mph in 10.0 seconds, which is a bit slower than the Focus Electric and about 2 or more seconds off the pace of the Fiat 500e and Spark EV.

    The EPA’s estimate for range with a full charge is 84 miles, but real-world range varies due to driving style, traffic conditions, cruising speed, battery age and ambient temperature. The agency also says the Leaf will typically use 30 kWh per 100 miles driven (the lower the number here, the better). Both of these estimates are good, though not quite class-leading.

    With a 240-volt power source, a Leaf with the 6.6 kW charger can recharge a depleted battery in about four hours (eight hours with the S model’s standard 3.3 kW charger). The quick-charge port (standard on the SV, optional on the others) can potentially be used to recharge the Leaf’s battery to a claimed 80 percent capacity in 30 minutes utilizing a special high-capacity power source.

    Standard safety features on all 2014 Nissan Leafs include antilock disc brakes, stability and traction control, front side airbags and side curtain airbags. A rearview camera is also standard, while SV and SL trims are eligible for a 360-degree parking camera system. In Edmunds brake testing, a Leaf came to a stop from 60 mph in 126 feet, which is average for a compact hatchback, but better than most EV competitors.

    In government crash testing, the Leaf received four out of five stars across the board for overall, frontal- and side-impact protection. The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety gave the Leaf its highest rating of Good in the moderate-overlap frontal-offset, side-impact and roof-strength crash tests. The Leaf’s seat/head restraint design was also rated Good for whiplash protection in rear impacts.

    Interior Design and Special Features

    Despite the 2014 Nissan Leaf’s economy car leanings, the interior is surprisingly pleasant, with a strong emphasis on modernity. The large center stack in the middle of the dash houses a majority of all vehicle system controls, and split-level instrument panels reinforce the high-tech feel with sharp graphics that relay critical information. Materials used throughout the interior are also slightly above average for an EV in this price range.

    Operating the many systems is easy thanks to logical menus in the central touchscreen and physical buttons for climate control. With this display and the Carwings telematics, owners can take advantage of more favorable utility rates by scheduling their charge during off-peak hours. While you can plug into a standard 110-volt household outlet, that’s best reserved for when you can park the Leaf overnight. For most owners, a 240-volt home charging station is almost a necessity.

    Since the Leaf was designed from the outset as an electric car, Nissan was able to locate the battery pack underneath the floor, and that results in a pretty roomy cabin. There’s plenty of front-seat headroom, though taller drivers may find legroom a bit cramped. Cargo room behind the rear seats is generous, at 24 cubic feet. Folding them flat increases maximum capacity to 30 cubes.

    Driving Impressions

    In the absence of an internal combustion engine, the all-electric 2014 Nissan Leaf is eerily quiet during acceleration and generally very agreeable. Even during quicker starts, a high-pitched whine is barely detectable. This level of silence tends to accentuate road and wind noise, but the Nissan’s cabin remains impressively quiet.

    Unlike traditional gasoline engines, electric motors can deliver their maximum power output from a standstill. As a result, the Leaf’s initial acceleration is brisk, though getting up to highway speeds can feel a little belabored, and most other EVs are quicker. More positively, the brake pedal is reassuringly firm and there’s none of the vagueness associated with some other EVs or hybrids. The Leaf is also stable around turns, thanks to a low center of gravity made possible by the car’s floor-mounted battery pack.



    Nissan Leaf Accessories & Parts. #car #auctions #sydney


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    Categories

    The Nissan Leaf is a mid-size hatchback electric car produced by Nissan Company. The name ‘LEAF’ is a reverse acronym composed of ‘Leading, Environmentally friendly, Affordable, Family car’. This five-door hatchback was introduced in the United States in December 2010. However, it first was unveiled in 22 North American cities in October 2009, when Nissan conducted the Zero Emission Tour. At every tour stop, visitors could view the vehicle and find out information about the zero-emission driving and its benefits as well. The Nissan Leaf is all-electric car that produces zero greenhouse gas emissions as well as tailpipe pollution during operation, and minimizes dependence on petroleum, since no gas is required. The Nissan Leaf was awarded with 2010 Green Car Vision Award and the 2011 European Car of the Year Award.

    The Nissan Leaf is equipped with 80 kW AC synchronous engine powered by 24 kWh lithium-ion battery. A front-installed electric engine paired with the single speed direct drive is rated to provide up to 120 hp. Nissan ensures the car top speed to be over 93 mph. The vehicle accelerates from 0 to 60 mph in 9.9 seconds. The lithium-ion battery pack includes 48 modules. Every module consists of four stacked and air cooled laminar battery cells that provide specific energy of 140 Wh/kg. The control module and the battery weight is 300 kilograms. In view of its heavy weight, the battery pack is mounted below the the rear-seat compartment keeping the gravity center as low as possible. Assembled by Automotive Energy Supply Corporation, the Leaf is provided with eight years guarantee under normal use.

    All-electric Nissan Leaf is equipped with a standard and quick charging receptacles, 3.3 kW on-board charger and 120 V portable trickle charging cable. It requires 20 hours to fully recharge the discharged battery from a standard household outlet (120-volt, 15 amp) in North America. The battery can be charged in 8 hours from a 220/240-volt 30 amp supply, that can provide 3.3 kW on board charger. As per the United States electrical regulations, a 240-volt charging stations are required to be permanently wired to an AC outlet. Nissan selected AeroVironment to supply 240 V home charging station and installation services for the Nissan Leaf in North America.

    In the United States the Nissan Leaf is offered in the SV and the SL trim levels. An advanced navigation system and smartphone/Internet connection are available in SV trim. The SL trim level includes such Leaf parts as the automatic headlights and fog lights, rear view monitor, and solar panel spoiler. A home charging station is optional. All-electric hatchback has five seats and can normally cover up to 100 miles. The swooping design of the Nissan Leaf is recognizable as something different. A low hood is sandwiched between two unique V-shaped headlights, which reduces wind noise and drag. The Nissan Leaf interior parts are simple and elegant. The vehicle represents advanced generation that set new standards in styling and functionality, efficiency and advanced technologies. This kind of vehicle surely requires exquisite accessories and parts to be enhanced with!

    The Nissan Leaf is a bright representative of the new generation cars. The Leaf is reputed to be the world’s first zero-emission car. Well-engineered and well-designed the Nissan Leaf provides the driver with all expected safety features and conveniences. CARiD.com highly appreciates innovations in automotive market and provides modern drivers with Nissan Leaf Accessories and Parts in a wide choice and at the best prices. Find as good as it gets for your car at CARiD.com. Nissan Leaf accessories and parts.

    Whatever you expect from your Nissan Leaf, a bold look, mind-boggling performance, greater ride comfort, or safer driving, CARiD goes the extra mile to meet all your needs. Our extensive range of premium accessories and parts covers all the bases, whether you want your vehicle to be more powerful, smarter, fun to drive, or just need to restore it to original condition. We know how to throw a classy appeal into your Nissan Leaf and keep it providing the best performance, so trust us and get the greatest bang for the buck!

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    New and Used Nissan Leaf: Prices, Photos, Reviews, Specs – The Car Connection #cheapest #car #rental


    #leaf car
    #

    Nissan Leaf

    What will I get by subscribing to email updates?

    At The Car Connection we are continually striving to get you timely, relevant information about the vehicle you are interested in. Our email updates will notify you whenever we have new information on this vehicle.

    Model Years and Variations:

    Nissan now offers the Leaf in three trim levels. The budget-conscious Leaf S skips several items that were standard on all 2011 and 2012 models, including LED headlights, alloy wheels, and navigation. Above that, there is the mid-grade Leaf SV and then the range-topping Leaf SL.

    The Leaf is by far the best-selling electric car ever, but it competes with various different vehicles that plug in–both other battery-electric cars and also plug-in hybrids, which use a gasoline engine to supplement their limited battery range. Those range from this year’s all-new Chevrolet Volt range-extended electric car to the more expensive but much more capable Tesla Model S all-electric luxury sport sedan.

    The big change for 2016 in the Leaf was the addition of a larger 30-kilowatt-hour battery pack, which gave the Leaf a class-leading range of 107 miles. The base Leaf S model continues with the old 24-kWh pack, and a range of 84 miles, at a lower price. The bigger battery means that the Leaf offers more electric range than any other plug-in car except those from Tesla, starting at $70,000.

    There have been essentially two versions of the Nissan Leaf since its launch as a 2011 model. The 2011 and 2012 models were built in Japan, with prices suffering from the expensive Japanese yen as a result. When Nissan moved Leaf production for North America to Tennessee, it made several important changes–and cut the price considerably. The company added a new base-level Leaf S model and made dozens of smaller changes to features and equipment in response to feedback from vocal and enthusiastic early owners.

    The latest Leaf models start under $30,000, which means that for California buyers, the effective price after a $2,500 state purchase rebate and a $7,500 Federal income-tax credit can be below $20,000. Hawaii offers a $4,500 purchase rebate, Georgia offers a $5,000 income-tax credit, and there are a plethora of other state, local, and regional incentives as well. Those include the ability to travel with just a single occupant in the carpool lane on the crowded freeways of California.

    Until 2016, all Leafs used a 24-kilowatt-hour lithium-ion battery pack built into the car’s floorpan to power an 80-kilowatt (107-horsepower) electric motor that drives the front wheels. The compact Leaf offers enough interior room to deem it a midsize car, and its weight of well over 3,000 pounds is clearly more in line with the larger category. Like all electric cars, which can develop peak torque from 0 rpm, it is brisk off the line. Acceleration from zero to 60 mph is in the 10-second range, and top speed is limited to roughly 90 mph.

    Electric range for the 24-kWh Leaf is rated by the EPA at 84 miles, but that number is not directly comparable to range ratings from previous years, as the states of battery charge–whether to 80 percent (for longer battery life) or 100 percent (for maximum range)–were not consistent among the years. Gentle driving can produce real-world range up to 15 percent higher. Owners quickly learn, however, that range can vary from 65 to 100 miles depending on speed, outside temperature, and how much use is made of the Leaf’s heater in cold weather.

    Significant changes to the Leaf for 2013 included downsizing and relocating the battery charger from the load bay into the engine compartment, which expanded cargo capacity. Equally important to everyday usage was an optional 6.6-kilowatt charger (later made standard on all but the base Leaf S) that cut charging time for a fully depleted battery from seven hours to about four, using a 240-volt Level 2 charging station. (That power is the same kind used for electric stoves and clothes driers.) All Leafs come with a 110-volt charging cord for use with standard household current, but most do not rely solely on it because it takes up to 20 hours to charge a fully depleted pack.

    Most Leafs can also “quick-charge” up to 80 percent of their battery capacity within 30 minutes at special “DC quick charging” charging stations that work on the Japanese CHAdeMO standard. Those stations are still rare, but are being rolled out in regions–Oregon and Washington, parts of Texas–that are working aggressively to adopt electric cars.

    All Leaf models except the base S include the ability to pre-heat or pre-cool the car while it’s still plugged in, to reduce battery energy use. They can be controlled for this purpose through a website or smartphone app. The Leaf’s pale grey, coarse, velvety upholstery material is made from recycled plastic bottles and home appliances; a black interior and leather seats are options as well.

    The Leaf remains more expensive to buy than a comparably sized gas-powered hatch. Its financial advantage lies in operation costs, which are significantly lower than burning fuel. Even with fluctuation of electricity prices from region to region, the Leaf wins; the national average price per kilowatt-hour is around 12 cents, meaning it costs on average 3 cents per mile. That’s compared to 16 cents per mile in a gas-powered car running at 25 mpg on $4/gallon fuel.



    Nissan Leaf Reviews – Nissan Leaf Price, Photos, and Specs – Car and Driver #car #game


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    2013 Nissan Leaf SL

    Fourth place: Field of Dreams.

    2016 Nissan Leaf Nissan Leaf 2016 2.0 1.0 5.0

    The only car here sold exclusively as an electric should ace this test, right? Nissan s expensive and risky clean-sheet approach should give it no excuses for falling short of outright total domination. And indeed, the Leaf does a lot of things very well.

    Push the blue button on the steering wheel and the nav display handily shows your range in concentric circles on the map, the larger one a one-way trip, the smaller for a round trip. Push it again to be shown the nearest charging stations. The center screen also can show you current energy consumption by both the drive motor and the car s auxiliary systems (the Fit and Spark also have a version of this), plus a full menu of energy data, from your consumption history to your recharge times based on several levels of charging power.

    No question, the Leaf s creators fretted over its EV-centric details, even if the baggy styling could use a little work. The real problem for us is that the Leaf isn t as composed as the Focus and the Fit, and it isn t much fun to drive.

    The Smart s last-place finish isn t the result of some grudge against tiny vehicles, even ones that look like Willy Wonka s car if Willy Wonka ran a Ukrainian cathouse. We totally buy the concept of the Smart, even applaud the former DaimlerChrysler for first putting it into production way back in 1998. We just don t buy its execution. In striving so earnestly to be different, Smart forgot to make a good car.

    The handling is just bizarre. The steering is epically slow, and it s nearly impossible to take a clean line through a corner as the front and rear ends quibble over which way to go. From overhead, your path would look octagonal. Heading straight down a highway, your senses are prodded to confusion by strange side forces as the car stumbles over bumps and suddenly gets the wiggles for no obvious reason. The floor-mounted brake pedal is abrupt. Even if you never leave the city, where the Smart is designed to thrive, you ll still live in fear of hard stops, hard rights, and curved on-ramps.



    Four Electric Cars To Avoid Buying Used (Get A Nissan Leaf! ): UPDATE #isuzu #cars


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    Four Electric Cars To Avoid Buying Used (Get A Nissan Leaf!): UPDATE

    2012 Coda Sedan

    There are lots of very good plug-in electric cars for sale now, and quite a few of them–especially Nissan Leafs–are starting to show up on used-car lots as three-year leases expire.

    We recently suggested some used hybrid-electric vehicles to avoid on the used-car lot.

    Now we turn to electric cars.

    Here are four plug-in vehicles we suggest you think long and hard before buying, no matter how attractive their prices.

    Three are battery-electric, and one is a range-extended electric luxury sedan.

    [EDITOR’S NOTE. We originally published this article in May 2013, and it proved surprisingly popular. We’ve gone back and updated it two years later to reflect the latest news and state of the used electric-car market, though we haven’t yet added any new entries that we consider enormously substandard. Your mileage may vary.]

    2012 Coda Sedan

    This one may be easy to avoid, since Coda reportedly only sold 100 or so of its slab-sided battery-electric compact sedans.

    The company’s Sino-American stew started life as an adaptation of a Mitsubishi-derived Chinese-market Hafei Saibao.

    The Coda company fitted lithium-ion cells from China into a battery pack, and inserted it along with the traction motor, into the rolling “glider” in a small California factory.

    The car might have had a chance if it came to market in 2010 (the original plan) before the Nissan Leaf and Chevy Volt launched.

    As it was, the Coda finally struggled onto the market well after both those cars from major auto companies landed in dealerships across the country.

    While it appeared to have a real-world range of close to 100 miles, it was so riddled with detail deficiencies that not only was it not ready for prime time, it was genuinely irritating to drive.

    2012 Coda Sedan

    If you ever see one on a used-car lot, be aware that parts and service may be a challenge.

    Then consider a used Nissan Leaf instead. Leafs from 2011 and 2012 are now selling below $10,000, an they’re still piling up on some dealer lots.

    Coda, meanwhile, is entirely out of the car business and has now retreated to selling stationary battery storage systems.

    2012 Fisker Karma in Costco parking lot, Santa Monica, California [photo: Chris Williams]

    We have to admit, Fisker’s only production car is one striking design. And many of the 2,000 or so Karma owners love their cars.

    That said, the company hasn’t built a car since July 2012, and most dealers long ago abandoned the brand–and their Fisker buyers–in droves.

    Meanwhile, asking prices for used Fisker Karmas seem to hover around $50,000, for cars that sold new a few years ago for $106,000 and more.

    2012 Fisker Karma EcoSport

    But Fiskers suffered from numerous quality problems on launch that led to recalls, service bulletins, and updates.

    A very active Fisker forum is the recourse for owners who have to source their own repairs and parts for a car that’s still only three years old.

    The Karma itself is a two-and-a-half-ton car with the footprint of a BMW 7-Series, so little interior room that the EPA calls it a subcompact, and a jaw-droppingly tiny trunk.

    It’s also the least energy-efficient plug-in electric passenger car ever sold on the U.S. market.

    2012 Fisker Karma + Aero L-39 Albatros jet trainer, Hollister Municipal Airport, CA [by Refael Azi]

    The company’s new owner is China’s largest auto-parts maker, Wanxiang. It is reportedly working to fix many dozen quality issues and design flaws, with the goal of relaunching the Fisker Karma in 2016 or later.

    To its credit, Wanxiang has considerably stepped up support for the existing base of Karma owners, and is working to re-establish service centers and make parts more available.

    It’s possible that the Fisker Karma story will have a happy ending, but we suggest that potential buyers do a lot of research to understand what they’re getting into.



    New 2017 Nissan Leaf: More Details On New Styling, Range-And Infiniti Electric Too #scrap #car


    #leaf car
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    New 2017 Nissan Leaf: More Details On New Styling, Range–And Infiniti Electric Too

    The Nissan Leaf is by far the highest-volume electric car ever built, with 110,000-plus on the roads now.

    And three and a half years after its launch, Nissan is pushing hard to boost its sales all over the world.

    Nissan Leaf using CHAdeMO fast-charger

    But what about the next Nissan Leaf, one designed with several years of battery development since the original?

    We now know that the next-generation Leaf–likely a 2017 model–will remain a compact five-door hatchback, the most popular body style globally.

    But the next Nissan Leaf will have slightly less oddball design cues–and it will offer a choice of battery-pack sizes at different price ranges.

    The latter, we already knew, but the news that its styling will be closer to the mainstream we hadn’t known until now.

    Lithium-ion battery pack of 2011 Nissan Leaf, showing cells assembled into modules

    Longer range from all-new battery

    As reported by trade journal Automotive News . Nissan executives shed more light on the second-generation Leaf in comments at the Beijing Auto Show.

    Andy Palmer, the always-informative executive vice president who’s Nissan’s product chief, said a new battery chemistry will debut “by 2017” in both the next Leaf and–slightly beforehand–an all-electric Infiniti luxury sedan.

    Before that, however, the current Leaf will be updated with a slightly revised cell chemistry that is much more tolerant of extremely hot-weather conditions.

    Palmer called the all-new chemistry for 2017 “the game-changing technology,” for its greater energy density and hence its longer range.

    He told Automotive News that the new formulation is “all about range and energy density,” and said that for Nissan, the technology is “moving very, very fast.”

    All-electric Infiniti

    Palmer also revealed that an Infiniti electric car will be launched somewhat before the next-generation Leaf, before the end of March 2017 at the latest.

    2012 Infiniti LE Concept

    Both cars will likely be revealed as concepts or production cars several months before launch, at a minimum.

    This means that the luxury electric car first shown at the 2012 New York Auto Show as the Infiniti LE concept is back on the product plan, likely in a somewhat updated version.

    It had previously been canceled for Nissan’s luxury brand to focus on other, higher-volume global vehicle lines–but apparently it’s now back, revised to compete more directly with likely future offerings from Tesla Motors.

    Specifically, it will go to market with the new battery chemistry and larger packs giving it a far greater range than the 70 or 80 miles it would likely have had with the 24-kWh Leaf battery pack used by the 2012 concept car.

    The strong global sales of the pricey Tesla Model S luxury sedan, with its 208- and 265-mile rated ranges (depending on battery size), clearly indicates that in the higher price brackets, a longer electric range is a must for battery-electric cars.

    So, to summarize, here’s our stab at a potential schedule for these updates:

    • Spring/Summer 2014: New “hot-weather” battery chemistry introduced for Nissan Leaf, probably for 2015 model-year cars
    • Sometime in 2015: Production version of Infiniti battery-electric sedan unveiled at auto show
    • Sometime in 2016: Infiniti electric car goes on sale, production version of 2017 Nissan Leaf unveiled

    2014 Nissan Leaf

    If Nissan can meet its goal of selling 10,000 Leafs per month globally, or more than 100,000 a year, there could well be close to half a million current-generation Nissan Leafs on the world’s roads by the time the second-generation 2017 car is launched.

    When that next Leaf offers more range, with a base model presumably cheaper than today’s Leaf S and up to three battery sizes offering ranges up to 125 miles (200 km)–and perhaps as much as 150 miles–the Leaf will enter a whole new arena of competitiveness.

    And despite Tesla’s plans to build more than 100,000 a year of its third-generation car, often called the “Model E,” Nissan seems likely to stay the world’s dominant manufacturer of battery-electric cars for many years to come.

    _______________________________________________



    New and Used Nissan Leaf: Prices, Photos, Reviews, Specs – The Car Connection #import #cars #from #japan


    #leaf car
    #

    Nissan Leaf

    What will I get by subscribing to email updates?

    At The Car Connection we are continually striving to get you timely, relevant information about the vehicle you are interested in. Our email updates will notify you whenever we have new information on this vehicle.

    Model Years and Variations:

    Nissan now offers the Leaf in three trim levels. The budget-conscious Leaf S skips several items that were standard on all 2011 and 2012 models, including LED headlights, alloy wheels, and navigation. Above that, there is the mid-grade Leaf SV and then the range-topping Leaf SL.

    The Leaf is by far the best-selling electric car ever, but it competes with various different vehicles that plug in–both other battery-electric cars and also plug-in hybrids, which use a gasoline engine to supplement their limited battery range. Those range from this year’s all-new Chevrolet Volt range-extended electric car to the more expensive but much more capable Tesla Model S all-electric luxury sport sedan.

    The big change for 2016 in the Leaf was the addition of a larger 30-kilowatt-hour battery pack, which gave the Leaf a class-leading range of 107 miles. The base Leaf S model continues with the old 24-kWh pack, and a range of 84 miles, at a lower price. The bigger battery means that the Leaf offers more electric range than any other plug-in car except those from Tesla, starting at $70,000.

    There have been essentially two versions of the Nissan Leaf since its launch as a 2011 model. The 2011 and 2012 models were built in Japan, with prices suffering from the expensive Japanese yen as a result. When Nissan moved Leaf production for North America to Tennessee, it made several important changes–and cut the price considerably. The company added a new base-level Leaf S model and made dozens of smaller changes to features and equipment in response to feedback from vocal and enthusiastic early owners.

    The latest Leaf models start under $30,000, which means that for California buyers, the effective price after a $2,500 state purchase rebate and a $7,500 Federal income-tax credit can be below $20,000. Hawaii offers a $4,500 purchase rebate, Georgia offers a $5,000 income-tax credit, and there are a plethora of other state, local, and regional incentives as well. Those include the ability to travel with just a single occupant in the carpool lane on the crowded freeways of California.

    Until 2016, all Leafs used a 24-kilowatt-hour lithium-ion battery pack built into the car’s floorpan to power an 80-kilowatt (107-horsepower) electric motor that drives the front wheels. The compact Leaf offers enough interior room to deem it a midsize car, and its weight of well over 3,000 pounds is clearly more in line with the larger category. Like all electric cars, which can develop peak torque from 0 rpm, it is brisk off the line. Acceleration from zero to 60 mph is in the 10-second range, and top speed is limited to roughly 90 mph.

    Electric range for the 24-kWh Leaf is rated by the EPA at 84 miles, but that number is not directly comparable to range ratings from previous years, as the states of battery charge–whether to 80 percent (for longer battery life) or 100 percent (for maximum range)–were not consistent among the years. Gentle driving can produce real-world range up to 15 percent higher. Owners quickly learn, however, that range can vary from 65 to 100 miles depending on speed, outside temperature, and how much use is made of the Leaf’s heater in cold weather.

    Significant changes to the Leaf for 2013 included downsizing and relocating the battery charger from the load bay into the engine compartment, which expanded cargo capacity. Equally important to everyday usage was an optional 6.6-kilowatt charger (later made standard on all but the base Leaf S) that cut charging time for a fully depleted battery from seven hours to about four, using a 240-volt Level 2 charging station. (That power is the same kind used for electric stoves and clothes driers.) All Leafs come with a 110-volt charging cord for use with standard household current, but most do not rely solely on it because it takes up to 20 hours to charge a fully depleted pack.

    Most Leafs can also “quick-charge” up to 80 percent of their battery capacity within 30 minutes at special “DC quick charging” charging stations that work on the Japanese CHAdeMO standard. Those stations are still rare, but are being rolled out in regions–Oregon and Washington, parts of Texas–that are working aggressively to adopt electric cars.

    All Leaf models except the base S include the ability to pre-heat or pre-cool the car while it’s still plugged in, to reduce battery energy use. They can be controlled for this purpose through a website or smartphone app. The Leaf’s pale grey, coarse, velvety upholstery material is made from recycled plastic bottles and home appliances; a black interior and leather seats are options as well.

    The Leaf remains more expensive to buy than a comparably sized gas-powered hatch. Its financial advantage lies in operation costs, which are significantly lower than burning fuel. Even with fluctuation of electricity prices from region to region, the Leaf wins; the national average price per kilowatt-hour is around 12 cents, meaning it costs on average 3 cents per mile. That’s compared to 16 cents per mile in a gas-powered car running at 25 mpg on $4/gallon fuel.



    2013 Nissan Leaf Hatchback Review #best #used #cars #to #buy


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    2013 Nissan Leaf Hatchback

    Edmunds’ Review

    Edmunds Expert Review of the 2013 Nissan Leaf Hatchback

    Although there are a handful of choices now for an electric vehicle now, the 2013 Nissan Leaf is still the most established. It’s a smart choice for an EV.

    Spacious, quiet cabin; ample features; established in terms of reliability and availability; affordable base price.

    What’s New for 2013

    The 2013 Nissan Leaf receives a new 6.6-kW onboard charger that cuts charging times in half. There’s also a new “B-mode” driving mode that increases regenerative braking during deceleration. Finally, Nissan has added a more affordable S model to the lineup.

    Introduction

    One of the first full-electric vehicles marketed to American buyers, the Nissan Leaf enters its third year of production with a handful of refinements that should keep it foremost in the minds of EV shoppers. Now assembled at Nissan’s Tennessee plant, the 2013 Nissan Leaf features a new 6.6-kW onboard charger that can replenish the battery in about four hours using a 220-volt electricity source. That’s about half the time it took previously.

    The bigger news, however, is the introduction of the more affordably priced entry-level S trim level. With it, Nissan has made the Leaf one of the most accessible electric cars on the market. The S is not a bare-bones stripper model either, as it features power accessories, keyless entry, heated front and rear seats, Bluetooth and USB/iPod connectivity. The Leaf’s older 3.6-kW charger is used here to keep costs down, but the new, quicker charger — standard on the upper trims — is an option.

    There’s a lot to like about the Leaf, including a spacious cabin and a tall, airy greenhouse that comfortably seats four full-size adults and provides excellent visibility. For 2013, increased cargo capacity makes the electric hatchback even more useful. On the road, the Leaf offers peppy acceleration and, were it not for the lack of engine noise, you might think you were driving any number of gas-powered compacts.

    If you’re an EV shopper, 2013 is a good year, as there are now more choices than ever. The 2013 Ford Focus Electric is the most formidable challenger, with a slightly more powerful electric motor and sharper handling. The 2013 Fiat 500e is smaller than either, but offers shoppers in California (the only state where Fiat plans to sell it) another urban-friendly alternative. Honda is also in the game now with its competitive Fit EV .

    For long-distance commuters, the Chevrolet Volt, Ford C-Max, Toyota Prius and Volkswagen Jetta Hybrid all offer a combination of gas and electric power and greater range. Still, if a full-electric vehicle makes sense for your lifestyle, the 2013 Nissan Leaf is a smart choice.

    No Video Content

    Body Styles, Trim Levels, and Options

    The 2013 Nissan Leaf is an all-electric four-door hatchback available in S, SV and SL trim levels.

    Standard equipment on the S includes 16-inch steel wheels, heated exterior mirrors, a battery heater, keyless ignition/entry, full power accessories, automatic climate control, a heated tilt-only leather-wrapped steering wheel, heated front and rear seats and 60/40-split-folding rear seats. Also included are a 4.3-inch LCD information display, Bluetooth, an advanced trip computer and a four-speaker sound system with a CD player, satellite radio, a USB/iPod port and auxiliary audio jack. A rearview camera and upgraded 6.6-kW charger are optional.

    The SV adds the upgraded 6.6-kW charger, 16-inch alloy wheels, cruise control, an auto-dimming rearview mirror, a hybrid heater system, cloth upholstery made from recycled material, a six-speaker sound system with Pandora radio streaming, a 7-inch touchscreen, a navigation system and Nissan Connected, a remote vehicle access system that reports battery recharging data and can activate the climate control via a smartphone. The SV’s LED Headlights and Quick Charge Port package adds, as you can likely guess, automatic LED headlights, foglamps and a quick-charge port that facilitates charging to 80 percent capacity in 30 minutes at high-voltage public charging stations.

    The SL tops off the lineup with the SV’s optional features as standard plus 17-inch alloy wheels, a spoiler-mounted solar panel (used for powering the Leaf’s accessories) and leather upholstery. A premium seven-speaker Bose sound system, packaged with a 360-degree-view monitor, is optional on both SV and SL trims.

    Powertrains and Performance

    The 2013 Nissan Leaf is powered by an 80-kilowatt electric motor (107 horsepower and 187 pound-feet of torque) fed by a 24 kWh lithium-ion battery pack. In Edmunds performance testing, a Leaf accelerated from zero to 60 mph in 10.2 seconds, which is a bit slower than the Fit EV and Focus Electric.

    EPA estimated range with a full charge stands at 75 miles, a couple miles better than last year thanks to improvements to the Leaf’s regenerative braking and aerodynamics. Of course, real-world range varies due to driving style, traffic conditions, cruising speed, battery age and ambient temperature. In terms of efficiency, the EPA says the Leaf will typically use 29 kWh per 100 miles driven (remember that the lower the number here, the better). Converted, that’s an energy efficiency equivalent rating (MPGe) of 129 mpg city/102 mpg highway and 115 mpg combined.

    The 2013 Nissan Leaf comes standard with antilock disc brakes, stability and traction control, front side airbags and side curtain airbags. A rearview camera is optional on the base model, while SV and SL trim levels can opt for a 360-degree-view monitor. In Edmunds brake testing, a 2012 Leaf came to a stop from 60 mph in 130 feet, which is a bit longer than average for a compact hatchback.

    In government crash testing, the Leaf received five out of five stars for overall protection, with four stars for total frontal-impact protection and five stars for total side-impact protection. The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety gave the Leaf its highest rating of Good in frontal-offset, side-impact and roof-strength tests.

    Interior Design and Special Features

    The Leaf’s battery pack is located under the floor beneath the seats. This space-efficient placement is partially responsible for the car’s roomy rear seats, which provide comfortable accommodation for adults. There’s no shortage of headroom in the first row, though taller drivers may find their legs a little crunched. Nissan relocated the onboard charger to the front of the 2013 Leaf, increasing rear cargo space to 24 cubic feet behind the rear seats. Folding the rear seats yields 30 cubic feet of space.

    A split-level instrument cluster dominates the cabin. The center control panel features a touchscreen, which controls the navigation system and shows special displays for parameters like cruising range and energy efficiency readouts. You can even program the start time for the recharging system to take advantage of lower electricity rates. Interior quality is similar to other compact cars, but overall fit and finish is a cut above.

    While you can charge the Leaf on a standard 110-volt household outlet, this is best reserved for when you can park the Leaf overnight. For most owners, a 220-volt home charging station is almost a necessity. At around $2,200, it’s a practical investment that can fully charge the Leaf in four hours if your car has the 6.6-kW charger.

    Driving Impressions

    If you’ve driven a hybrid, you know how silent they are in electric-only mode. The 2013 Nissan Leaf cruises with this kind of serenity at all times, with only a vague high-pitched whine detectable under heavy throttle. Even the high-pitched noise the Leaf generates to alert pedestrians at low speeds is largely undetectable in the cabin. The downside is that wind and road noise are more noticeable at highway speeds, but overall Nissan’s EV is impressively quiet.

    Due to its all-electric nature, the Leaf offers brisk acceleration from a stop, though getting up to freeway speeds can feel a little belabored. Many newer EV or hybrid competitors are a bit quicker. The Leaf’s brake pedal feel is firm and sure, though, without the strange, vague feel of many regenerative braking systems. With its battery pack mounted low in the body and a well-tuned electric power steering system, the Nissan Leaf is surprisingly steady around turns. It responds pretty much like other well-engineered compact family cars, and in most ways it feels very normal to drive.



    New and Used Nissan Leaf: Prices, Photos, Reviews, Specs – The Car Connection #car #hire #manchester


    #leaf car
    #

    Nissan Leaf

    What will I get by subscribing to email updates?

    At The Car Connection we are continually striving to get you timely, relevant information about the vehicle you are interested in. Our email updates will notify you whenever we have new information on this vehicle.

    Model Years and Variations:

    Nissan now offers the Leaf in three trim levels. The budget-conscious Leaf S skips several items that were standard on all 2011 and 2012 models, including LED headlights, alloy wheels, and navigation. Above that, there is the mid-grade Leaf SV and then the range-topping Leaf SL.

    The Leaf is by far the best-selling electric car ever, but it competes with various different vehicles that plug in–both other battery-electric cars and also plug-in hybrids, which use a gasoline engine to supplement their limited battery range. Those range from this year’s all-new Chevrolet Volt range-extended electric car to the more expensive but much more capable Tesla Model S all-electric luxury sport sedan.

    The big change for 2016 in the Leaf was the addition of a larger 30-kilowatt-hour battery pack, which gave the Leaf a class-leading range of 107 miles. The base Leaf S model continues with the old 24-kWh pack, and a range of 84 miles, at a lower price. The bigger battery means that the Leaf offers more electric range than any other plug-in car except those from Tesla, starting at $70,000.

    There have been essentially two versions of the Nissan Leaf since its launch as a 2011 model. The 2011 and 2012 models were built in Japan, with prices suffering from the expensive Japanese yen as a result. When Nissan moved Leaf production for North America to Tennessee, it made several important changes–and cut the price considerably. The company added a new base-level Leaf S model and made dozens of smaller changes to features and equipment in response to feedback from vocal and enthusiastic early owners.

    The latest Leaf models start under $30,000, which means that for California buyers, the effective price after a $2,500 state purchase rebate and a $7,500 Federal income-tax credit can be below $20,000. Hawaii offers a $4,500 purchase rebate, Georgia offers a $5,000 income-tax credit, and there are a plethora of other state, local, and regional incentives as well. Those include the ability to travel with just a single occupant in the carpool lane on the crowded freeways of California.

    Until 2016, all Leafs used a 24-kilowatt-hour lithium-ion battery pack built into the car’s floorpan to power an 80-kilowatt (107-horsepower) electric motor that drives the front wheels. The compact Leaf offers enough interior room to deem it a midsize car, and its weight of well over 3,000 pounds is clearly more in line with the larger category. Like all electric cars, which can develop peak torque from 0 rpm, it is brisk off the line. Acceleration from zero to 60 mph is in the 10-second range, and top speed is limited to roughly 90 mph.

    Electric range for the 24-kWh Leaf is rated by the EPA at 84 miles, but that number is not directly comparable to range ratings from previous years, as the states of battery charge–whether to 80 percent (for longer battery life) or 100 percent (for maximum range)–were not consistent among the years. Gentle driving can produce real-world range up to 15 percent higher. Owners quickly learn, however, that range can vary from 65 to 100 miles depending on speed, outside temperature, and how much use is made of the Leaf’s heater in cold weather.

    Significant changes to the Leaf for 2013 included downsizing and relocating the battery charger from the load bay into the engine compartment, which expanded cargo capacity. Equally important to everyday usage was an optional 6.6-kilowatt charger (later made standard on all but the base Leaf S) that cut charging time for a fully depleted battery from seven hours to about four, using a 240-volt Level 2 charging station. (That power is the same kind used for electric stoves and clothes driers.) All Leafs come with a 110-volt charging cord for use with standard household current, but most do not rely solely on it because it takes up to 20 hours to charge a fully depleted pack.

    Most Leafs can also “quick-charge” up to 80 percent of their battery capacity within 30 minutes at special “DC quick charging” charging stations that work on the Japanese CHAdeMO standard. Those stations are still rare, but are being rolled out in regions–Oregon and Washington, parts of Texas–that are working aggressively to adopt electric cars.

    All Leaf models except the base S include the ability to pre-heat or pre-cool the car while it’s still plugged in, to reduce battery energy use. They can be controlled for this purpose through a website or smartphone app. The Leaf’s pale grey, coarse, velvety upholstery material is made from recycled plastic bottles and home appliances; a black interior and leather seats are options as well.

    The Leaf remains more expensive to buy than a comparably sized gas-powered hatch. Its financial advantage lies in operation costs, which are significantly lower than burning fuel. Even with fluctuation of electricity prices from region to region, the Leaf wins; the national average price per kilowatt-hour is around 12 cents, meaning it costs on average 3 cents per mile. That’s compared to 16 cents per mile in a gas-powered car running at 25 mpg on $4/gallon fuel.



    Nissan Leaf Reviews – Nissan Leaf Price, Photos, and Specs – Car and Driver #used #cars #denver


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    2013 Nissan Leaf SL

    Fourth place: Field of Dreams.

    2016 Nissan Leaf Nissan Leaf 2016 2.0 1.0 5.0

    The only car here sold exclusively as an electric should ace this test, right? Nissan s expensive and risky clean-sheet approach should give it no excuses for falling short of outright total domination. And indeed, the Leaf does a lot of things very well.

    Push the blue button on the steering wheel and the nav display handily shows your range in concentric circles on the map, the larger one a one-way trip, the smaller for a round trip. Push it again to be shown the nearest charging stations. The center screen also can show you current energy consumption by both the drive motor and the car s auxiliary systems (the Fit and Spark also have a version of this), plus a full menu of energy data, from your consumption history to your recharge times based on several levels of charging power.

    No question, the Leaf s creators fretted over its EV-centric details, even if the baggy styling could use a little work. The real problem for us is that the Leaf isn t as composed as the Focus and the Fit, and it isn t much fun to drive.

    The Smart s last-place finish isn t the result of some grudge against tiny vehicles, even ones that look like Willy Wonka s car if Willy Wonka ran a Ukrainian cathouse. We totally buy the concept of the Smart, even applaud the former DaimlerChrysler for first putting it into production way back in 1998. We just don t buy its execution. In striving so earnestly to be different, Smart forgot to make a good car.

    The handling is just bizarre. The steering is epically slow, and it s nearly impossible to take a clean line through a corner as the front and rear ends quibble over which way to go. From overhead, your path would look octagonal. Heading straight down a highway, your senses are prodded to confusion by strange side forces as the car stumbles over bumps and suddenly gets the wiggles for no obvious reason. The floor-mounted brake pedal is abrupt. Even if you never leave the city, where the Smart is designed to thrive, you ll still live in fear of hard stops, hard rights, and curved on-ramps.



    At Under $19K for a Nissan Leaf, Does the Math on Electric Cars Finally Add Up? #auto #dealer


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    Nissan s Leaf has a long way to go to expand beyond its status as a niche commuter car. Sales have been underwhelming, even with cheap lease offers. leading some to declare the Leaf an overpriced, impractical flop. Will this change now that the Leaf isn t quite so overpriced?

    For a while now, we ve heard that the new Nissan Leaf will have a cheaper sticker price than older models. Now we know just how much cheaper it ll be.

    Impressively, the retail price of the 2013 Nissan Leaf will drop by over six grand.

    This week at the Detroit Auto Show, Nissan announced that the new Leaf S series will start with an MSRP of $28,800, which undercuts the previous least expensive Leaf by $6,400, representing a drop of 18%. Add up the incentives for buyers—$7,500 in federal tax credits, plus a $2,500 rebate in certain states, including California —and drivers can essentially pay full price for a Leaf for as little as $18,800.

    A drop of more than $6,000 in a vehicle s sticker price is undeniably a big deal. Normally, an automobile model s MSRP only goes in one direction. up. Any official dip in price can make news, and when the decline is substantial, like whenVolkswagen dropped the starting price of the Jetta by $2,400. it can provide a major boost to sales.

    Is that what we can expect from the new Leaf? Surely, the lower price will push some buyers into getting off the fence in the consideration of an electric vehicle. But Leaf sales have underwhelmed before, falling well short of sales goals in each of its first two years on the market, and they may do so again. Nissan anticipated a 50% rise in Leaf sales in 2012, only to see sales increase by 22%, even as the automaker rolled out discounted lease deals toward the end of the year. Before that, Leaf sales were often down compared to corresponding months in 2011.

    For 2013, Nissan is projecting a sales increase of at least 20% for the Leaf, thanks to the newly cheaper price. Now customers won t have to pay a premium for owning a green car that s really fun to drive, and that s exciting, Billy Hayes, global vice president of Leaf sales, stated via press release. That statement, of course, basically owns up to the idea that anyone buying a Leaf in the past was indeed paying a high premium for the privilege.

    While the new lower-priced S model Leaf is getting all the attention, the 2013 versions of the SV and SL Leaf are also cheaper than preceding models, by $3,380 and $2,410 respectively. How can Nissan cut prices like this? Lower costs for batteries and other parts help. Nissan may also be willing to eat some of the potential profits in order to get more Leafs on the road; that wouldn t be surprising given the speculation that surfaced last year that Chevy loses tens of thousands of dollars on each Volt sold.

    Regardless of how Nissan gets to the price point for the Leaf, has it reached the point that mainstream buyers will bite? A report from the Congressional Budget Office published last fall estimated that when comparing a pure battery-powered vehicles like the Leaf to a similar gas-powered car, tax credits would still need to be about 50 percent higher than they are now to fully offset the higher lifetime costs of an all-electric vehicle. In other words, instead of a $7,500 tax credit, something like $11,250 would cut it.

    The math changes, however, now that the cheapest Leaf is $6,000 less. State rebates help put the math in the Leaf s favor too, of course. Based on the new math, it would seem that it s less expensive to own a Leaf rather than a similar traditional car like the Nissan Versa, all things being equal.

    The problem, of course, is that all things aren t equal. After adding up initial price, insurance, fuel and other expenses, a Leaf owner may pay less out of pocket than a Versa owner over the course of five to seven years, but over that time period the Versa owner is never subjected to so-called range anxiety. The Leaf owner can only make it 70 or 80 miles without having to stop for hours (overnight, probably) to recharge. The Versa owner, on the other hand, can embark on serendipitous road trips without carefully plotting mileage and charging stations and without having to pause for huge chunks of the day to refill the tank.

    For drivers in search of a vehicle strictly for mid-size commuting purposes, the Leaf makes more sense than ever. Yet for drivers who demand more in a car, the Leaf probably isn t the solution at any price.



    Nissan Leaf Accessories & Parts. #car #hire #sydney


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    The Nissan Leaf is a mid-size hatchback electric car produced by Nissan Company. The name ‘LEAF’ is a reverse acronym composed of ‘Leading, Environmentally friendly, Affordable, Family car’. This five-door hatchback was introduced in the United States in December 2010. However, it first was unveiled in 22 North American cities in October 2009, when Nissan conducted the Zero Emission Tour. At every tour stop, visitors could view the vehicle and find out information about the zero-emission driving and its benefits as well. The Nissan Leaf is all-electric car that produces zero greenhouse gas emissions as well as tailpipe pollution during operation, and minimizes dependence on petroleum, since no gas is required. The Nissan Leaf was awarded with 2010 Green Car Vision Award and the 2011 European Car of the Year Award.

    The Nissan Leaf is equipped with 80 kW AC synchronous engine powered by 24 kWh lithium-ion battery. A front-installed electric engine paired with the single speed direct drive is rated to provide up to 120 hp. Nissan ensures the car top speed to be over 93 mph. The vehicle accelerates from 0 to 60 mph in 9.9 seconds. The lithium-ion battery pack includes 48 modules. Every module consists of four stacked and air cooled laminar battery cells that provide specific energy of 140 Wh/kg. The control module and the battery weight is 300 kilograms. In view of its heavy weight, the battery pack is mounted below the the rear-seat compartment keeping the gravity center as low as possible. Assembled by Automotive Energy Supply Corporation, the Leaf is provided with eight years guarantee under normal use.

    All-electric Nissan Leaf is equipped with a standard and quick charging receptacles, 3.3 kW on-board charger and 120 V portable trickle charging cable. It requires 20 hours to fully recharge the discharged battery from a standard household outlet (120-volt, 15 amp) in North America. The battery can be charged in 8 hours from a 220/240-volt 30 amp supply, that can provide 3.3 kW on board charger. As per the United States electrical regulations, a 240-volt charging stations are required to be permanently wired to an AC outlet. Nissan selected AeroVironment to supply 240 V home charging station and installation services for the Nissan Leaf in North America.

    In the United States the Nissan Leaf is offered in the SV and the SL trim levels. An advanced navigation system and smartphone/Internet connection are available in SV trim. The SL trim level includes such Leaf parts as the automatic headlights and fog lights, rear view monitor, and solar panel spoiler. A home charging station is optional. All-electric hatchback has five seats and can normally cover up to 100 miles. The swooping design of the Nissan Leaf is recognizable as something different. A low hood is sandwiched between two unique V-shaped headlights, which reduces wind noise and drag. The Nissan Leaf interior parts are simple and elegant. The vehicle represents advanced generation that set new standards in styling and functionality, efficiency and advanced technologies. This kind of vehicle surely requires exquisite accessories and parts to be enhanced with!

    The Nissan Leaf is a bright representative of the new generation cars. The Leaf is reputed to be the world’s first zero-emission car. Well-engineered and well-designed the Nissan Leaf provides the driver with all expected safety features and conveniences. CARiD.com highly appreciates innovations in automotive market and provides modern drivers with Nissan Leaf Accessories and Parts in a wide choice and at the best prices. Find as good as it gets for your car at CARiD.com. Nissan Leaf accessories and parts.

    Whatever you expect from your Nissan Leaf, a bold look, mind-boggling performance, greater ride comfort, or safer driving, CARiD goes the extra mile to meet all your needs. Our extensive range of premium accessories and parts covers all the bases, whether you want your vehicle to be more powerful, smarter, fun to drive, or just need to restore it to original condition. We know how to throw a classy appeal into your Nissan Leaf and keep it providing the best performance, so trust us and get the greatest bang for the buck!

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    2013 Nissan Leaf Hatchback Review #car #hire #uk


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    2013 Nissan Leaf Hatchback

    Edmunds’ Review

    Edmunds Expert Review of the 2013 Nissan Leaf Hatchback

    Although there are a handful of choices now for an electric vehicle now, the 2013 Nissan Leaf is still the most established. It’s a smart choice for an EV.

    Spacious, quiet cabin; ample features; established in terms of reliability and availability; affordable base price.

    What’s New for 2013

    The 2013 Nissan Leaf receives a new 6.6-kW onboard charger that cuts charging times in half. There’s also a new “B-mode” driving mode that increases regenerative braking during deceleration. Finally, Nissan has added a more affordable S model to the lineup.

    Introduction

    One of the first full-electric vehicles marketed to American buyers, the Nissan Leaf enters its third year of production with a handful of refinements that should keep it foremost in the minds of EV shoppers. Now assembled at Nissan’s Tennessee plant, the 2013 Nissan Leaf features a new 6.6-kW onboard charger that can replenish the battery in about four hours using a 220-volt electricity source. That’s about half the time it took previously.

    The bigger news, however, is the introduction of the more affordably priced entry-level S trim level. With it, Nissan has made the Leaf one of the most accessible electric cars on the market. The S is not a bare-bones stripper model either, as it features power accessories, keyless entry, heated front and rear seats, Bluetooth and USB/iPod connectivity. The Leaf’s older 3.6-kW charger is used here to keep costs down, but the new, quicker charger — standard on the upper trims — is an option.

    There’s a lot to like about the Leaf, including a spacious cabin and a tall, airy greenhouse that comfortably seats four full-size adults and provides excellent visibility. For 2013, increased cargo capacity makes the electric hatchback even more useful. On the road, the Leaf offers peppy acceleration and, were it not for the lack of engine noise, you might think you were driving any number of gas-powered compacts.

    If you’re an EV shopper, 2013 is a good year, as there are now more choices than ever. The 2013 Ford Focus Electric is the most formidable challenger, with a slightly more powerful electric motor and sharper handling. The 2013 Fiat 500e is smaller than either, but offers shoppers in California (the only state where Fiat plans to sell it) another urban-friendly alternative. Honda is also in the game now with its competitive Fit EV .

    For long-distance commuters, the Chevrolet Volt, Ford C-Max, Toyota Prius and Volkswagen Jetta Hybrid all offer a combination of gas and electric power and greater range. Still, if a full-electric vehicle makes sense for your lifestyle, the 2013 Nissan Leaf is a smart choice.

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    Body Styles, Trim Levels, and Options

    The 2013 Nissan Leaf is an all-electric four-door hatchback available in S, SV and SL trim levels.

    Standard equipment on the S includes 16-inch steel wheels, heated exterior mirrors, a battery heater, keyless ignition/entry, full power accessories, automatic climate control, a heated tilt-only leather-wrapped steering wheel, heated front and rear seats and 60/40-split-folding rear seats. Also included are a 4.3-inch LCD information display, Bluetooth, an advanced trip computer and a four-speaker sound system with a CD player, satellite radio, a USB/iPod port and auxiliary audio jack. A rearview camera and upgraded 6.6-kW charger are optional.

    The SV adds the upgraded 6.6-kW charger, 16-inch alloy wheels, cruise control, an auto-dimming rearview mirror, a hybrid heater system, cloth upholstery made from recycled material, a six-speaker sound system with Pandora radio streaming, a 7-inch touchscreen, a navigation system and Nissan Connected, a remote vehicle access system that reports battery recharging data and can activate the climate control via a smartphone. The SV’s LED Headlights and Quick Charge Port package adds, as you can likely guess, automatic LED headlights, foglamps and a quick-charge port that facilitates charging to 80 percent capacity in 30 minutes at high-voltage public charging stations.

    The SL tops off the lineup with the SV’s optional features as standard plus 17-inch alloy wheels, a spoiler-mounted solar panel (used for powering the Leaf’s accessories) and leather upholstery. A premium seven-speaker Bose sound system, packaged with a 360-degree-view monitor, is optional on both SV and SL trims.

    Powertrains and Performance

    The 2013 Nissan Leaf is powered by an 80-kilowatt electric motor (107 horsepower and 187 pound-feet of torque) fed by a 24 kWh lithium-ion battery pack. In Edmunds performance testing, a Leaf accelerated from zero to 60 mph in 10.2 seconds, which is a bit slower than the Fit EV and Focus Electric.

    EPA estimated range with a full charge stands at 75 miles, a couple miles better than last year thanks to improvements to the Leaf’s regenerative braking and aerodynamics. Of course, real-world range varies due to driving style, traffic conditions, cruising speed, battery age and ambient temperature. In terms of efficiency, the EPA says the Leaf will typically use 29 kWh per 100 miles driven (remember that the lower the number here, the better). Converted, that’s an energy efficiency equivalent rating (MPGe) of 129 mpg city/102 mpg highway and 115 mpg combined.

    The 2013 Nissan Leaf comes standard with antilock disc brakes, stability and traction control, front side airbags and side curtain airbags. A rearview camera is optional on the base model, while SV and SL trim levels can opt for a 360-degree-view monitor. In Edmunds brake testing, a 2012 Leaf came to a stop from 60 mph in 130 feet, which is a bit longer than average for a compact hatchback.

    In government crash testing, the Leaf received five out of five stars for overall protection, with four stars for total frontal-impact protection and five stars for total side-impact protection. The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety gave the Leaf its highest rating of Good in frontal-offset, side-impact and roof-strength tests.

    Interior Design and Special Features

    The Leaf’s battery pack is located under the floor beneath the seats. This space-efficient placement is partially responsible for the car’s roomy rear seats, which provide comfortable accommodation for adults. There’s no shortage of headroom in the first row, though taller drivers may find their legs a little crunched. Nissan relocated the onboard charger to the front of the 2013 Leaf, increasing rear cargo space to 24 cubic feet behind the rear seats. Folding the rear seats yields 30 cubic feet of space.

    A split-level instrument cluster dominates the cabin. The center control panel features a touchscreen, which controls the navigation system and shows special displays for parameters like cruising range and energy efficiency readouts. You can even program the start time for the recharging system to take advantage of lower electricity rates. Interior quality is similar to other compact cars, but overall fit and finish is a cut above.

    While you can charge the Leaf on a standard 110-volt household outlet, this is best reserved for when you can park the Leaf overnight. For most owners, a 220-volt home charging station is almost a necessity. At around $2,200, it’s a practical investment that can fully charge the Leaf in four hours if your car has the 6.6-kW charger.

    Driving Impressions

    If you’ve driven a hybrid, you know how silent they are in electric-only mode. The 2013 Nissan Leaf cruises with this kind of serenity at all times, with only a vague high-pitched whine detectable under heavy throttle. Even the high-pitched noise the Leaf generates to alert pedestrians at low speeds is largely undetectable in the cabin. The downside is that wind and road noise are more noticeable at highway speeds, but overall Nissan’s EV is impressively quiet.

    Due to its all-electric nature, the Leaf offers brisk acceleration from a stop, though getting up to freeway speeds can feel a little belabored. Many newer EV or hybrid competitors are a bit quicker. The Leaf’s brake pedal feel is firm and sure, though, without the strange, vague feel of many regenerative braking systems. With its battery pack mounted low in the body and a well-tuned electric power steering system, the Nissan Leaf is surprisingly steady around turns. It responds pretty much like other well-engineered compact family cars, and in most ways it feels very normal to drive.



    Used Nissan Leaf For Sale – Motor Trend #police #cars #for #sale


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    Nissan Leaf Accessories & Parts. #wrecked #cars #for #sale


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    Categories

    The Nissan Leaf is a mid-size hatchback electric car produced by Nissan Company. The name ‘LEAF’ is a reverse acronym composed of ‘Leading, Environmentally friendly, Affordable, Family car’. This five-door hatchback was introduced in the United States in December 2010. However, it first was unveiled in 22 North American cities in October 2009, when Nissan conducted the Zero Emission Tour. At every tour stop, visitors could view the vehicle and find out information about the zero-emission driving and its benefits as well. The Nissan Leaf is all-electric car that produces zero greenhouse gas emissions as well as tailpipe pollution during operation, and minimizes dependence on petroleum, since no gas is required. The Nissan Leaf was awarded with 2010 Green Car Vision Award and the 2011 European Car of the Year Award.

    The Nissan Leaf is equipped with 80 kW AC synchronous engine powered by 24 kWh lithium-ion battery. A front-installed electric engine paired with the single speed direct drive is rated to provide up to 120 hp. Nissan ensures the car top speed to be over 93 mph. The vehicle accelerates from 0 to 60 mph in 9.9 seconds. The lithium-ion battery pack includes 48 modules. Every module consists of four stacked and air cooled laminar battery cells that provide specific energy of 140 Wh/kg. The control module and the battery weight is 300 kilograms. In view of its heavy weight, the battery pack is mounted below the the rear-seat compartment keeping the gravity center as low as possible. Assembled by Automotive Energy Supply Corporation, the Leaf is provided with eight years guarantee under normal use.

    All-electric Nissan Leaf is equipped with a standard and quick charging receptacles, 3.3 kW on-board charger and 120 V portable trickle charging cable. It requires 20 hours to fully recharge the discharged battery from a standard household outlet (120-volt, 15 amp) in North America. The battery can be charged in 8 hours from a 220/240-volt 30 amp supply, that can provide 3.3 kW on board charger. As per the United States electrical regulations, a 240-volt charging stations are required to be permanently wired to an AC outlet. Nissan selected AeroVironment to supply 240 V home charging station and installation services for the Nissan Leaf in North America.

    In the United States the Nissan Leaf is offered in the SV and the SL trim levels. An advanced navigation system and smartphone/Internet connection are available in SV trim. The SL trim level includes such Leaf parts as the automatic headlights and fog lights, rear view monitor, and solar panel spoiler. A home charging station is optional. All-electric hatchback has five seats and can normally cover up to 100 miles. The swooping design of the Nissan Leaf is recognizable as something different. A low hood is sandwiched between two unique V-shaped headlights, which reduces wind noise and drag. The Nissan Leaf interior parts are simple and elegant. The vehicle represents advanced generation that set new standards in styling and functionality, efficiency and advanced technologies. This kind of vehicle surely requires exquisite accessories and parts to be enhanced with!

    The Nissan Leaf is a bright representative of the new generation cars. The Leaf is reputed to be the world’s first zero-emission car. Well-engineered and well-designed the Nissan Leaf provides the driver with all expected safety features and conveniences. CARiD.com highly appreciates innovations in automotive market and provides modern drivers with Nissan Leaf Accessories and Parts in a wide choice and at the best prices. Find as good as it gets for your car at CARiD.com. Nissan Leaf accessories and parts.

    Whatever you expect from your Nissan Leaf, a bold look, mind-boggling performance, greater ride comfort, or safer driving, CARiD goes the extra mile to meet all your needs. Our extensive range of premium accessories and parts covers all the bases, whether you want your vehicle to be more powerful, smarter, fun to drive, or just need to restore it to original condition. We know how to throw a classy appeal into your Nissan Leaf and keep it providing the best performance, so trust us and get the greatest bang for the buck!

    Featured Products



    Nissan Leaf Reviews – Nissan Leaf Price, Photos, and Specs – Car and Driver #cheapest #car #insurance #for #young #drivers


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    2013 Nissan Leaf SL

    Fourth place: Field of Dreams.

    2016 Nissan Leaf Nissan Leaf 2016 2.0 1.0 5.0

    The only car here sold exclusively as an electric should ace this test, right? Nissan s expensive and risky clean-sheet approach should give it no excuses for falling short of outright total domination. And indeed, the Leaf does a lot of things very well.

    Push the blue button on the steering wheel and the nav display handily shows your range in concentric circles on the map, the larger one a one-way trip, the smaller for a round trip. Push it again to be shown the nearest charging stations. The center screen also can show you current energy consumption by both the drive motor and the car s auxiliary systems (the Fit and Spark also have a version of this), plus a full menu of energy data, from your consumption history to your recharge times based on several levels of charging power.

    No question, the Leaf s creators fretted over its EV-centric details, even if the baggy styling could use a little work. The real problem for us is that the Leaf isn t as composed as the Focus and the Fit, and it isn t much fun to drive.

    The Smart s last-place finish isn t the result of some grudge against tiny vehicles, even ones that look like Willy Wonka s car if Willy Wonka ran a Ukrainian cathouse. We totally buy the concept of the Smart, even applaud the former DaimlerChrysler for first putting it into production way back in 1998. We just don t buy its execution. In striving so earnestly to be different, Smart forgot to make a good car.

    The handling is just bizarre. The steering is epically slow, and it s nearly impossible to take a clean line through a corner as the front and rear ends quibble over which way to go. From overhead, your path would look octagonal. Heading straight down a highway, your senses are prodded to confusion by strange side forces as the car stumbles over bumps and suddenly gets the wiggles for no obvious reason. The floor-mounted brake pedal is abrupt. Even if you never leave the city, where the Smart is designed to thrive, you ll still live in fear of hard stops, hard rights, and curved on-ramps.



    2015 Nissan Leaf Reviews, Pictures and Prices #buy #car


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    Nissan Leaf Review

    Research Other Years

    Critics think the all-electric 2015 Nissan Leaf has composed handling and a spacious interior, but they say it could use more power for passing on the highway.

    The 2015 Nissan Leaf is ranked:

    The 2015 Nissan Leaf is powered by an electric motor, and many test drivers say it delivers good acceleration from a stop. However, some reviewers report that the Leaf can struggle to overtake other cars at highway speeds. Test drivers like that, at speed, the Leaf is especially smooth and practically silent. The EPA reports that the Leaf gets 126/101 mpg-equivalent city/highway, which is good for an electric car. The Leaf can travel 84 miles on a fully charged battery, and some critics note that the Leaf s driving range may limit its appeal to some shoppers. Reviewers report that the Leaf has an agile ride, communicative steering and feels stable while cornering. Critics add that the Leaf s firm brake pedal provides excellent feedback.

    More Photos

    Low-rent plastics line the 2015 Nissan Leaf’s interior, auto journalists write, but they like the cabin’s contemporary styling. Critics say the Leaf feels roomy on the inside and offers exceptional outward visibility. They add that the front seats are spacious, and a few find the rear seats roomier than those found in many compact cars. The Leaf s cargo space is good for an electric car. Standard features on the 2015 Nissan Leaf include Bluetooth, automatic climate control, satellite radio, a USB port and a rearview camera. Optional features include navigation, a seven-speaker Bose audio system and Nissan s Around View Monitor, which uses multiple cameras to give a 360-degree view around the vehicle when parking.

      “The 2015 Nissan Leaf possesses everything necessary to placate environmentalists, technophiles and any forward-thinking consumers looking to cut back on high fuel bills.” — AutoTrader “Overall, we think the pioneering Leaf continues to be a great choice and a good value for an EV.” — Edmunds “While it has a limited driving range, in most other respects the Leaf is quite similar to a conventional gas-powered compact hatchback, offering a comfortable interior and surprisingly snappy acceleration (albeit with zero emissions).” — Left Lane News “If you have an unpredictable driving schedule, travel more than 100 miles per day or live in a residence without 220-volt power support, better options are the Chevrolet Volt, Toyota Prius Plug-in or Ford C-Max Energi. These plug-in hybrids can travel hundreds of miles thanks to their onboard gasoline engines.” — Kelley Blue Book (2014)

    Other Cars to Consider

    The Chevrolet Spark EV has a slightly lower base price than the Leaf, and it gets a marginally better mpg-e rating. Critics agree that the Spark EV feels powerful and responsive off the line, and many appreciate its nimble handling and excellent maneuverability.

    The Toyota Prius Plug-in can t travel as far on a charge, but its hybrid powertrain means that you don t have to worry about running out of battery power. The Prius Plug-in also offers terrific fuel economy for a hybrid car, and reviewers like its spacious cargo hold.

    Details: 2015 Nissan Leaf

    The 2015 Nissan Leaf is a five-seat, front-wheel drive hatchback that is powered by an electric motor. It comes in S, SV and SL trims. The Leaf hasn t been fully redesigned since its debut in the 2011 model year. As a result, this overview uses applicable research and reviews from the 2011 through 2015 model years.



    At Under $19K for a Nissan Leaf, Does the Math on Electric Cars Finally Add Up? #car #posters


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    Nissan s Leaf has a long way to go to expand beyond its status as a niche commuter car. Sales have been underwhelming, even with cheap lease offers. leading some to declare the Leaf an overpriced, impractical flop. Will this change now that the Leaf isn t quite so overpriced?

    For a while now, we ve heard that the new Nissan Leaf will have a cheaper sticker price than older models. Now we know just how much cheaper it ll be.

    Impressively, the retail price of the 2013 Nissan Leaf will drop by over six grand.

    This week at the Detroit Auto Show, Nissan announced that the new Leaf S series will start with an MSRP of $28,800, which undercuts the previous least expensive Leaf by $6,400, representing a drop of 18%. Add up the incentives for buyers—$7,500 in federal tax credits, plus a $2,500 rebate in certain states, including California —and drivers can essentially pay full price for a Leaf for as little as $18,800.

    A drop of more than $6,000 in a vehicle s sticker price is undeniably a big deal. Normally, an automobile model s MSRP only goes in one direction. up. Any official dip in price can make news, and when the decline is substantial, like whenVolkswagen dropped the starting price of the Jetta by $2,400. it can provide a major boost to sales.

    Is that what we can expect from the new Leaf? Surely, the lower price will push some buyers into getting off the fence in the consideration of an electric vehicle. But Leaf sales have underwhelmed before, falling well short of sales goals in each of its first two years on the market, and they may do so again. Nissan anticipated a 50% rise in Leaf sales in 2012, only to see sales increase by 22%, even as the automaker rolled out discounted lease deals toward the end of the year. Before that, Leaf sales were often down compared to corresponding months in 2011.

    For 2013, Nissan is projecting a sales increase of at least 20% for the Leaf, thanks to the newly cheaper price. Now customers won t have to pay a premium for owning a green car that s really fun to drive, and that s exciting, Billy Hayes, global vice president of Leaf sales, stated via press release. That statement, of course, basically owns up to the idea that anyone buying a Leaf in the past was indeed paying a high premium for the privilege.

    While the new lower-priced S model Leaf is getting all the attention, the 2013 versions of the SV and SL Leaf are also cheaper than preceding models, by $3,380 and $2,410 respectively. How can Nissan cut prices like this? Lower costs for batteries and other parts help. Nissan may also be willing to eat some of the potential profits in order to get more Leafs on the road; that wouldn t be surprising given the speculation that surfaced last year that Chevy loses tens of thousands of dollars on each Volt sold.

    Regardless of how Nissan gets to the price point for the Leaf, has it reached the point that mainstream buyers will bite? A report from the Congressional Budget Office published last fall estimated that when comparing a pure battery-powered vehicles like the Leaf to a similar gas-powered car, tax credits would still need to be about 50 percent higher than they are now to fully offset the higher lifetime costs of an all-electric vehicle. In other words, instead of a $7,500 tax credit, something like $11,250 would cut it.

    The math changes, however, now that the cheapest Leaf is $6,000 less. State rebates help put the math in the Leaf s favor too, of course. Based on the new math, it would seem that it s less expensive to own a Leaf rather than a similar traditional car like the Nissan Versa, all things being equal.

    The problem, of course, is that all things aren t equal. After adding up initial price, insurance, fuel and other expenses, a Leaf owner may pay less out of pocket than a Versa owner over the course of five to seven years, but over that time period the Versa owner is never subjected to so-called range anxiety. The Leaf owner can only make it 70 or 80 miles without having to stop for hours (overnight, probably) to recharge. The Versa owner, on the other hand, can embark on serendipitous road trips without carefully plotting mileage and charging stations and without having to pause for huge chunks of the day to refill the tank.

    For drivers in search of a vehicle strictly for mid-size commuting purposes, the Leaf makes more sense than ever. Yet for drivers who demand more in a car, the Leaf probably isn t the solution at any price.



    Nissan Leaf Reviews – Nissan Leaf Price, Photos, and Specs – Car and Driver #automobile


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    2013 Nissan Leaf SL

    Fourth place: Field of Dreams.

    2016 Nissan Leaf Nissan Leaf 2016 2.0 1.0 5.0

    The only car here sold exclusively as an electric should ace this test, right? Nissan s expensive and risky clean-sheet approach should give it no excuses for falling short of outright total domination. And indeed, the Leaf does a lot of things very well.

    Push the blue button on the steering wheel and the nav display handily shows your range in concentric circles on the map, the larger one a one-way trip, the smaller for a round trip. Push it again to be shown the nearest charging stations. The center screen also can show you current energy consumption by both the drive motor and the car s auxiliary systems (the Fit and Spark also have a version of this), plus a full menu of energy data, from your consumption history to your recharge times based on several levels of charging power.

    No question, the Leaf s creators fretted over its EV-centric details, even if the baggy styling could use a little work. The real problem for us is that the Leaf isn t as composed as the Focus and the Fit, and it isn t much fun to drive.

    The Smart s last-place finish isn t the result of some grudge against tiny vehicles, even ones that look like Willy Wonka s car if Willy Wonka ran a Ukrainian cathouse. We totally buy the concept of the Smart, even applaud the former DaimlerChrysler for first putting it into production way back in 1998. We just don t buy its execution. In striving so earnestly to be different, Smart forgot to make a good car.

    The handling is just bizarre. The steering is epically slow, and it s nearly impossible to take a clean line through a corner as the front and rear ends quibble over which way to go. From overhead, your path would look octagonal. Heading straight down a highway, your senses are prodded to confusion by strange side forces as the car stumbles over bumps and suddenly gets the wiggles for no obvious reason. The floor-mounted brake pedal is abrupt. Even if you never leave the city, where the Smart is designed to thrive, you ll still live in fear of hard stops, hard rights, and curved on-ramps.



    Nissan Leaf Car Insurance – Learn About Rates & Discounts #used #cars #ni


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    Nissan Leaf Car Insurance

    You’ve got questions about insuring a Nissan Leaf. We’ve got answers. Here’s some information you may need about Nissan Leaf car insurance rates, safety features that could save you money, discounts that help your bottom line, and coverage that gives you peace of mind.

    How much does Nissan Leaf car insurance cost?

    Step 1 Find the coverage you need

    You’re unique. Your insurance should be too. The right car insurance for you depends on the coverage you need and the monthly premium and deductible that best suit your budget.

    Use our bumper-to-bumper guide to learn about the different types of car insurance coverage.

    Also check out our state-by-state guide to car insurance, and learn about the coverage options available in your state.

    Step 2 Evaluate discounts

    Step 3 Get an Estimate

    Cookie-cutter car insurance can end up costing you extra money, and may not give you the coverage you need. Once you’ve figured out the coverage that’s right for you and your budget, use our free car insurance quote tool to build the policy that’s right for you. You can also talk to your local Allstate agent. or call 1-866-261-6900 to talk to a licensed professional.

    How can I save money on Nissan Leaf car insurance?



    Nissan Leaf Accessories & Parts. #car #radiator


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    Categories

    The Nissan Leaf is a mid-size hatchback electric car produced by Nissan Company. The name ‘LEAF’ is a reverse acronym composed of ‘Leading, Environmentally friendly, Affordable, Family car’. This five-door hatchback was introduced in the United States in December 2010. However, it first was unveiled in 22 North American cities in October 2009, when Nissan conducted the Zero Emission Tour. At every tour stop, visitors could view the vehicle and find out information about the zero-emission driving and its benefits as well. The Nissan Leaf is all-electric car that produces zero greenhouse gas emissions as well as tailpipe pollution during operation, and minimizes dependence on petroleum, since no gas is required. The Nissan Leaf was awarded with 2010 Green Car Vision Award and the 2011 European Car of the Year Award.

    The Nissan Leaf is equipped with 80 kW AC synchronous engine powered by 24 kWh lithium-ion battery. A front-installed electric engine paired with the single speed direct drive is rated to provide up to 120 hp. Nissan ensures the car top speed to be over 93 mph. The vehicle accelerates from 0 to 60 mph in 9.9 seconds. The lithium-ion battery pack includes 48 modules. Every module consists of four stacked and air cooled laminar battery cells that provide specific energy of 140 Wh/kg. The control module and the battery weight is 300 kilograms. In view of its heavy weight, the battery pack is mounted below the the rear-seat compartment keeping the gravity center as low as possible. Assembled by Automotive Energy Supply Corporation, the Leaf is provided with eight years guarantee under normal use.

    All-electric Nissan Leaf is equipped with a standard and quick charging receptacles, 3.3 kW on-board charger and 120 V portable trickle charging cable. It requires 20 hours to fully recharge the discharged battery from a standard household outlet (120-volt, 15 amp) in North America. The battery can be charged in 8 hours from a 220/240-volt 30 amp supply, that can provide 3.3 kW on board charger. As per the United States electrical regulations, a 240-volt charging stations are required to be permanently wired to an AC outlet. Nissan selected AeroVironment to supply 240 V home charging station and installation services for the Nissan Leaf in North America.

    In the United States the Nissan Leaf is offered in the SV and the SL trim levels. An advanced navigation system and smartphone/Internet connection are available in SV trim. The SL trim level includes such Leaf parts as the automatic headlights and fog lights, rear view monitor, and solar panel spoiler. A home charging station is optional. All-electric hatchback has five seats and can normally cover up to 100 miles. The swooping design of the Nissan Leaf is recognizable as something different. A low hood is sandwiched between two unique V-shaped headlights, which reduces wind noise and drag. The Nissan Leaf interior parts are simple and elegant. The vehicle represents advanced generation that set new standards in styling and functionality, efficiency and advanced technologies. This kind of vehicle surely requires exquisite accessories and parts to be enhanced with!

    The Nissan Leaf is a bright representative of the new generation cars. The Leaf is reputed to be the world’s first zero-emission car. Well-engineered and well-designed the Nissan Leaf provides the driver with all expected safety features and conveniences. CARiD.com highly appreciates innovations in automotive market and provides modern drivers with Nissan Leaf Accessories and Parts in a wide choice and at the best prices. Find as good as it gets for your car at CARiD.com. Nissan Leaf accessories and parts.

    Whatever you expect from your Nissan Leaf, a bold look, mind-boggling performance, greater ride comfort, or safer driving, CARiD goes the extra mile to meet all your needs. Our extensive range of premium accessories and parts covers all the bases, whether you want your vehicle to be more powerful, smarter, fun to drive, or just need to restore it to original condition. We know how to throw a classy appeal into your Nissan Leaf and keep it providing the best performance, so trust us and get the greatest bang for the buck!

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    Four Electric Cars To Avoid Buying Used (Get A Nissan Leaf! ): UPDATE


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    Four Electric Cars To Avoid Buying Used (Get A Nissan Leaf!): UPDATE

    2012 Coda Sedan

    There are lots of very good plug-in electric cars for sale now, and quite a few of them–especially Nissan Leafs–are starting to show up on used-car lots as three-year leases expire.

    We recently suggested some used hybrid-electric vehicles to avoid on the used-car lot.

    Now we turn to electric cars.

    Here are four plug-in vehicles we suggest you think long and hard before buying, no matter how attractive their prices.

    Three are battery-electric, and one is a range-extended electric luxury sedan.

    [EDITOR’S NOTE. We originally published this article in May 2013, and it proved surprisingly popular. We’ve gone back and updated it two years later to reflect the latest news and state of the used electric-car market, though we haven’t yet added any new entries that we consider enormously substandard. Your mileage may vary.]

    2012 Coda Sedan

    This one may be easy to avoid, since Coda reportedly only sold 100 or so of its slab-sided battery-electric compact sedans.

    The company’s Sino-American stew started life as an adaptation of a Mitsubishi-derived Chinese-market Hafei Saibao.

    The Coda company fitted lithium-ion cells from China into a battery pack, and inserted it along with the traction motor, into the rolling “glider” in a small California factory.

    The car might have had a chance if it came to market in 2010 (the original plan) before the Nissan Leaf and Chevy Volt launched.

    As it was, the Coda finally struggled onto the market well after both those cars from major auto companies landed in dealerships across the country.

    While it appeared to have a real-world range of close to 100 miles, it was so riddled with detail deficiencies that not only was it not ready for prime time, it was genuinely irritating to drive.

    2012 Coda Sedan

    If you ever see one on a used-car lot, be aware that parts and service may be a challenge.

    Then consider a used Nissan Leaf instead. Leafs from 2011 and 2012 are now selling below $10,000, an they’re still piling up on some dealer lots.

    Coda, meanwhile, is entirely out of the car business and has now retreated to selling stationary battery storage systems.

    2012 Fisker Karma in Costco parking lot, Santa Monica, California [photo: Chris Williams]

    We have to admit, Fisker’s only production car is one striking design. And many of the 2,000 or so Karma owners love their cars.

    That said, the company hasn’t built a car since July 2012, and most dealers long ago abandoned the brand–and their Fisker buyers–in droves.

    Meanwhile, asking prices for used Fisker Karmas seem to hover around $50,000, for cars that sold new a few years ago for $106,000 and more.

    2012 Fisker Karma EcoSport

    But Fiskers suffered from numerous quality problems on launch that led to recalls, service bulletins, and updates.

    A very active Fisker forum is the recourse for owners who have to source their own repairs and parts for a car that’s still only three years old.

    The Karma itself is a two-and-a-half-ton car with the footprint of a BMW 7-Series, so little interior room that the EPA calls it a subcompact, and a jaw-droppingly tiny trunk.

    It’s also the least energy-efficient plug-in electric passenger car ever sold on the U.S. market.

    2012 Fisker Karma + Aero L-39 Albatros jet trainer, Hollister Municipal Airport, CA [by Refael Azi]

    The company’s new owner is China’s largest auto-parts maker, Wanxiang. It is reportedly working to fix many dozen quality issues and design flaws, with the goal of relaunching the Fisker Karma in 2016 or later.

    To its credit, Wanxiang has considerably stepped up support for the existing base of Karma owners, and is working to re-establish service centers and make parts more available.

    It’s possible that the Fisker Karma story will have a happy ending, but we suggest that potential buyers do a lot of research to understand what they’re getting into.