Buying a Car: What to Know Before You Go – Feature – Car and Driver #car #dvd


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Car-buying tips to follow before you ever set foot in a car dealership.

Feature

Now is a good time to buy a new car. The struggles facing the auto industry are unprecedented and so are the deals available to buyers. Car dealers need to sell cars in order to stay in business, which makes this a strong buyers market. Rebates, financing, and trade-in values are the best they ve been in a long time.

But that doesn t mean it s an easy time to buy a car, and it doesn t mean dealers are going to lie down and give the cars away. A savvy buyer must always be ready, and the preparation should start before you ever set foot in a showroom.

Know the Invoice Price

Once you ve settled on what car is right for you. look up the invoice price for that car in our Buyer s Guide. Invoice price is what the dealer pays the manufacturer for the car; the manufacturer s suggested retail price (MSRP, or sticker price ) includes hundreds usually thousands of dollars of profit for the dealer. With the exception of all-new or very popular models, you should be able to get a new car for closer to invoice than MSRP. Knowing the invoice price of your car will tell the dealer that you mean business and expect a good deal. Don t walk into the dealership without this information.

Check the Manufacturer s Website for Rebates

Many buyers will qualify for multiple rebates, some of which may not even be made public. You might belong to organizations or receive coupons in the mail that entitle you to additional rebates. Be aware of all rebates for which you qualify and make sure you receive them. Dealers are known for not giving buyers every rebate available to them, instead keeping one or two as additional profit.

Research the Dealers

Buying from a cooperative and fair dealer will save you money and headaches. There are a number of websites that allow people to post reviews of dealerships, but their coverage is spotty and incomplete. If you can t find online reviews of the dealer you are considering, just talk to people. Your friends and neighbors purchase cars and should be honest with you about whether they were happy with their car or dealer.

Check Your Credit History

Most people who shop for cars will need a loan. How much that loan costs will depend on your credit history, and knowing your credit history will give you a better idea what to expect from lenders. The Fair and Accurate Credit Transaction Act of 2003 (FACTA) allows every consumer to get a free copy of his or her credit report once a year from each of the three major credit-reporting agencies (TransUnion, Experian, and Equifax). Get a copy of your credit report, and check it for accuracy. Pay the extra few dollars to get your credit score as well, as it is one of the major factors that banks use to determine your creditworthiness.

Get Your Own Financing

The biggest profit center for a car dealership is its finance department. Dealers contract with banks to get the best rates available but might not actually give you those rates. They might get you a car loan for 4.9 percent APR but draw up your finance contract at 5.9 percent. That one-percent markup is strictly profit for the dealer. You can often get a better interest rate from your local bank or credit union, or you can present the rates you were offered elsewhere to your salesman and challenge him to match or beat them. That being said, promotional rates from manufacturers sometimes as low as zero percent can be tough to beat.

Time Your Purchase

Dealers run on a month-to-month basis. At the end of the month, many will accept lower offers to reach their goals and qualify for manufacturer bonuses. If you re not picky about having the latest and greatest, the end of a model year is a great time to get good deals on remaining inventory. And December particularly the last week before the new year is a slow time for car sales, so if you can hack some time out of your holiday-shopping schedule, it s a wise time to buy.

Also, most dealerships are busier on weekends. The weekdays are generally slow, especially in the morning. If you come into the dealership on a midweek morning when business is slow, the salespeople are more likely to make a good deal as well. They need sales and they want to look busy, which keeps them motivated to give you a better deal and earn your business.

Do Not Buy a Car on Your First Visit

Use the first visit to look at and test-drive the car(s) you are interested in. Gather your information and then leave, and be adamant that you will not be buying a car today. This will communicate to the dealer that you are not going to be bullied. Watch what you say to the salespeople especially if they ask you how much you are prepared to pay monthly because whatever you say will be used as a starting point from which the dealer will go up when negotiations eventually start.

Get Internet Quotes from Several Dealers

CARandDRIVER.com offers free online pricing quotes from your local dealers. Get quotes from multiple dealers before you ever visit any of them. If dealers know they are being pitted against other stores, it will be easier for you to get their best offer right off the bat, and waltzing into a dealership with a first offer already in hand gives you an advantage in negotiations.

Make an Appointment with the Sales Manager

Once your research is done and you are ready to head to the dealership to purchase a new car, call ahead and make an appointment. By calling a sales manager to make your appointment, you communicate that you are serious about this transaction and know what you are doing. You will still be paired with a salesman when you arrive, but your chances improve of getting a straight shooter who knows you won t be easy fodder.

There is no guarantee you will get a good deal on a new-car purchase, nor is there a set price to negotiate toward with any car; pricing always varies with content, age, supply, and demand. But following these rules will start you in the right direction to get the best deal possible on your new car.

Brian Munroe is the author of Car Buying Revealed. You can find out about Munroe and his book at his website, www.CarBuyingRevealed.com.


Car Hire France, 8 Things You Need to Know #car #pc


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Car Hire France, 8 Things you Need to Know

One. Book Early

Book early, book early, book early. I’ve repeated that 3 times to try and hammer the point home. Also to highlight the fact that if you don’t you could end up paying three times the price. Typically if you book 3 months before your trip you will pay just 33% of the price that someone else will be paying stood next to you at the desk. Why? Because they just decided to turn up at Calais or one of the main French airports and pay on the day to hire a car.

You can definitely search more companies quicker and potentially get a better deal that suits your needs if you use a couple of Car Hire Comparison websites.

I used to recommend some but in the light of my recent car hire problems abroad I no longer wish to point you in the direction of any in case you encounter problems.

That should not be the end of your research though. You will be wise to dig MUCH deeper than just looking at the headline price offered and then immediately booking it.

Car Hire firms are notorious the world over for adding EXTRAS on to the base cost and the unscrupulous pull every trick in the book to do so. See here for horror stories.

Three.  Check the Fuel Policy.

Give some thought to the mileage you will be doing and how much petrol/diesel you are likely to use? Is the fuel policy “Full to Full” or “Full to Empty” etc.

Be careful if you are not going to do more than a couple of hundred miles because if it’s “Full to Empty” they will charge you on collection for a full tank of fuel and you will only use a quarter of it and give them the rest back. Which they then sell to the next customer!

Also find out exactly how much they charge you for a tank of fuel as unscrupulous car hire firms often charge DOUBLE what the fuel would actually cost if you went to a garage yourself to fill up.

When you arrive to pick up your car a lot of car hire firms try and scare you into taking additional collision damage waiver (CDW).

They will try and scare you into paying around £20 per day for this cover which is an awful lot on a 14 day car hire. If you buy your own CDW separately it can be as little as £2 a day, which is a saving of over £250.

If you hire cars a lot throughout the year then you can actually buy an annual policy which will save you a fortune.

Remember they will often want to charge a holding deposit especially if you are not taking the CDW so make sure your credit card has sufficient budget available or this could cause problems and embarrassment.

Personally I would recommend using your credit card to pay for the car hire if the cost is over £100 as this affords you greater consumer protection in the unlikely event of there being a problem.

The holding deposits charged by some of the cowboy firms is over £1,000. Even more importantly check if they just reserve the funds on your card or actually charge the amount in full and then refund it later. Some bad operators do not return this money for well over a month and when you are back home it can be difficult to sort this out. Check before booking.

Six.  Child Seats and Sat Nav’s

Expect to pay around £5 a day to hire a child seat, so take your own if it’s not too much trouble Sat Nav’s cost about £60 to £80 per week to hire so personally I’d buy and take my own. I paid £260 for my last TomTom (It has live updates on traffic and Maps for the whole of Europe) but I use it a lot, both when I’m driving my own car in the UK and when on frequent French driving holidays so I definitely get my moneys worth. You can visit the TomTom Homepage  here.

Seven. Be a Forensic Scientist

Get your fine tooth-comb out upon collection especially and drop off and make absolutely sure you double check the car inside and out. Mark any damage or even the slightest scratch on the paperwork when you pick the car up, and don’t drop the car off without having it checked and signed for.

If it gets bumped in the car park after you have dropped it off but the paperwork isn’t signed you will be getting a bill for it. Often unscrupulous car hire firms in France will charge you for dents and scratches that you were not responsible for and often you don’t find out you have been charged until you get home.

If the car has scratches or wear and tear on collection I’d advise you to take photos’ or video the car on your phone.

Has the vehicle got Hi Viz vests for the occupants, a warning triangle, spare bulbs etc. Remember you can get on the spot fines for not carrying these items and blaming the hire company will not save you as the police won’t care. See our Driving in France Checklist page here for full details of what you need.

Drive Your Own Car?

Personally I’ve only hired a car a couple of times whilst on the continent; I normally just drive my own car though I’ve hired several in Spain and the UK. So driving your own car is certainly something to consider.

If you are looking for car rental in France for business purposes I fully understand but I personally love going through the tunnel or on the Ferry and driving through the French countryside but I understand that a lot of people like to Fly Drive to save time especially if they are going to the south of France. For me though the road trip is all part of the adventure!


What You Need to Know About Renting a Car #rent #a #car #prices


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What You Need to Know About

Renting a Car

June 2010

A little prep will help you hold the line on nuisance charges and fees.

By Thomas M. Anderson, Associate Editor

Editor’s Note: This story has been updated since its original publication.

1. Get ahead of the curve. Your goal is not to pay for insurance you already have. So before you hit the rental desk, find out what coverage your auto policy and credit-card benefits provide. First, call your insurer. Then call the toll-free number on the credit card you’ll use to pay for the rental.

2. Who covers what. Your auto policy generally covers rental-car damage. If, however, you’ve dropped comprehensive or collision coverage on your car, the rental car will not be covered if it is stolen or damaged in an accident. Your credit-card benefits supplement your auto coverage. Most cards will pick up your deductible, and premium cards offer beefier coverage. But credit-card protection doesn’t include liability.

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3. You may not need extra insurance. The clerk behind the desk will offer you a collision damage waiver (sometimes called a loss damage waiver), which can cost $10 to $20 per day. The CDW shields you if the rental car is damaged or stolen. But as long as the rental is for personal use and you have collision coverage, your own insurance will cover the rental (with the same deductibles that apply to your own car).

4. But it could come in handy. Even if you have coverage through your auto insurance, you may want to take the CDW. It will help you avoid the hassle of your insurer’s claims process and keep an accident off your record. Plus, car-rental agencies have been slapping customers with hefty “loss of use” and administrative fees. Most states do not include “loss of use” coverage in their standard auto policies; only Connecticut, Louisiana, Minnesota, New York, North Dakota, Rhode Island and Texas require such coverage. Caveat: By accepting the waiver from the rental-car company, you void the terms of your credit card’s insurance benefits.

5. It gets complicated overseas. Generally, your auto insurance does not cover you when you rent a car abroad, although some policies may apply when you drive in Canada and Mexico (check with your insurer). Many credit-card companies withhold coverage in countries with lousy accident records. For example, American Express and MasterCard exclude Australia, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Jamaica and New Zealand. Of the countries on that list, Visa takes issue with Ireland, Israel and Jamaica.

6. Bring your own GPS. Rental-car companies will nickel-and-dime you for bonus equipment, such as GPS units, which can cost $12 per day, and child car seats, about $10 per day. Bring your own digital music player and connectors to use as an alternative to satellite radio ($3 per day).

7. Gas up on your own. If you are in a hurry, paying for a full tank of gas ahead of time will save you the hassle of filling up on the way to the airport. But if you plan ahead, you can locate cheaper gas than the rate quoted at the counter. Plus, unless you expect to run through a full tank on your trip, you might be paying for fuel you don’t use.

8. Help move the fleet. You might get a seasonal deal if you drive a rental one way from Florida (because you’re helping the company move equipment). In April, Alamo offered one-way rentals from Florida to any other state in the continental U.S. for as little as $10 per day.


What You Must Know About Window Tinting #used #cars #for #sale #by #owner


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1) How long will it take to tint my car?

The average time it takes to tint a 2 or 4 door car is approximately 2 to 2.5 hours; we recommend dropping off your car when

possible to allow plenty of time to get the best possible result.

This time includes: cleaning the windows before installing the film, actually tinting the car, drying time, and making sure your

car is ready for you to take home and start enjoying your window tinting.

2) What does window tinting cost?

Often, a new or unscrupulous window tinting company will offer a very low bait price

however; window tinting should range for an average 2 or 4 door car approximately $150 to $250 depending on the type of

film you choose. Trucks might be slightly less and SUV s slightly more dependent on the vehicle.

3) What should I do before my appointment to ensure the best possible window tinting job?

The cleaner the car, the better the install — so make sure to wash the outside of your vehicle before bringing it to the shop.

Store personal items in the trunk or remove from the car — the installer must climb in the car to install the film.

4) What if I am late for my appointment?

We block out a certain amount of time for each customer s vehicle in order to provide the best customer service. Therefore, if

you are more than 10 minutes late for your appointment you may have to reschedule.

*If you miss your appointment a deposit of $50 will be required before another appointment can be scheduled.

5) What should I expect after my car is tinted?

You must leave your windows rolled up for two days after the windows are tinted because water, used to install the film, often

sits just below the lower seals on the inside of the car for a day or two before drying. The window tint will also look wet,

hazing, lumpy, etc. for 7 to 14 days depending on the weather and the type of film installed.

6) What if my windows are already tinted and I need new window film?

Unfortunately, nothing last forever. The good news is window tinting can be replaced! However, it can be costly; it can also

be well worth the cost. When having window tinting removed and replaced expect to leave your car with us for a full 24 hrs

and keep in mind there is an additional fee to remove the old film ranging from $20 for just two front doors, to an additional

$150 for an entire vehicle.

Read more here a b out common ripoffs!


6 Things Every Sucker Should Know Before Buying a Used Car #car #transportation


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6 Things Every Sucker Should Know Before Buying a Used Car

By Robert Brockway October 25, 2012 1,279,484 Views

Buying a used car is like going to a dentist who wants to knock out your old teeth and sell you new ones. Everybody involved in the process is assuredly biased, possibly psychotic, and actively wants to do you bodily harm. More sad, dissatisfied people have left car dealerships than strip clubs, and it’s no wonder: Cars are extremely complicated, terribly expensive, and for some reason every one is guarded by a small gang of pathological liars. It’s one of the worst experiences of your life, and you need somebody trustworthy to help you. Unfortunately, you’ve got me. Lucky for you, I have bought and destroyed more cars than is technically allowable by the United States government, and am therefore legally obligated to actually try to help you in this column, which I do as a “service” to the “community.” I think we can get through this, if you take my advice to heart.*

*Well, except for all the times I tell you to “flip the table on them bitches.” That’s just some good general advice I try to work in everywhere, and may not be applicable to the situation at hand.

#6. Do Your Research

Never, ever walk into a dealership “just to see what they’ve got.” Salesmen see that aimless stare on your face and they’re like starving cartoon wolves — they don’t even see a person; all they see is a giant walking turkey leg. Most small and midsize dealerships will have online inventories. Check those out in advance and start looking up the models you’re interested in, then read up on each one: Comb through car sites like Edmunds, click on forum posts by owners, get the specs and find out about users’ experience with reliability — hell, go to Wikipedia and bone up on the entire history of the model and the powertrain you’re considering. Back in school, you’d do the same amount of research for a book report on Huck Finn just because an older lady in a paneled skirt threatened you with the alphabet — you can do the same legwork for a multi-thousand-dollar purchase you’re going to entrust your life to every time you leave the house to get a burrito. Whatever you do, the point is to come in with a mental list: Do not let them steer you outside of that list to a car that you’re not familiar with. Adventure is wondrous and grand, but the used car lot is not the place to listen to strange old men in tattered clothes whisper of magical chariots.

“It’s dangerous to go alone. Take this Daihatsu!”

Now this is the important part, so pay attention: No matter what anybody tells you — no matter how respectable the source — never, ever, ever buy the Kia. Regardless of dealership affiliation, every used car lot on the planet has a dull red Kia out back that they want to show you. It’s going to feel wrong, somehow, like the air around it has gone stale. That’s the universe trying to warn you. There will be rational arguments, and your brain is gonna be all like, “Hey, it sounds like they’ve gotten a lot better lately,” and, “Look, even the car magazines think they’ve got some decent models.” But there’s a very simple explanation for this illusion: It’s a vast government conspiracy and everybody is in on it but me. They are terrible cars that will explode and betray you, no matter how meticulously you care for them. Isn’t that right, Optima, you fickle bitch?! You broke my heart! And for what? A measly 15,000 miles? I thought we had something! I spent two years inside of you. Does that mean nothing?!

#5. Dealing With the Dealer

You need to treat the first few moments at a dealership like an old-timey mobster being interrogated by the coppers: You don’t say nothin’ about nothin’. Financing? What’s that? Trade-ins? Ha, what a hilarious portmanteau of gibberish! Price range? I don’t even speak English.

The first step is just and only to find the car you want, go over it carefully, take stock of any work that needs doing, and barter out the final price. Only when that’s all settled do you talk about trading in something. Why would you discuss trade-ins right up front if you haven’t even found a car you like? You’re not even sure you’re shopping there yet. The grocery store doesn’t pull you aside when you walk in the doors and ask how much you’re planning to spend today. So why do dealerships always want to know your price, payment and trades first? Because it gives them leverage against you: “Oh, well, if we’re going to do you a favor and take this trade-in off your hands, you have to buy one of these pre-selected vehicles.” Or, “Oh, you’re financing? Those aren’t our finance cars. Our finance cars are all dull red Kias; let’s go out back and take a look.”

“Ignore the disembodied voices telling you to flee. That’s a. feature. Ghost-voicing. Costs extra.”

That’s bullshit. Everything is a finance car. Just like everything is a cash car. The car does not care how you pay for it. It is a car. Even if it becomes sentient, it’s mostly only going to care about fighting crime and ramping shit, like K.I.T.T. from Knight Rider. And brother, if that happens: You let it. You buy yourself a leather jacket and a perm and get the fuck out of there; your car search is over.

#4. Vehicle Inspection

There are a few basic things you can check, even if you know nothing about cars. First thing you want to do is get right up close against the side of the front fender. (This should also serve to draw out any potential sentient-car crime-fighting partners, as they cannot resist wisecracking and will likely say something cute like, “Geez, buy me dinner first.” If so, then you’re done: It’s all cowhide coverings and curly hair for the rest of your days.) If there’s little to no rapport between you and the vehicle at this point, just sight down the trim lines to make sure they’re straight with no fluctuations — offset doors, fenders, and uneven lines could indicate frame damage. Look around the engine bay at the spots where the metal struts come together — the joints should be straight, with no signs of recent welding. Take a look underneath the car and watch for rust on the rails, in the wheel wells, or basically anywhere else. Be afraid of rust. Rust is the mind-killer. You’ll think you can take rust — it’s just some pansy little oxidation, right? But you can’t. Rust is better than you. Rust will laugh at your feeble angle grinders; it will spit at your steel wool and mock your puny acids. Rust will shrug off all your mightiest efforts and then, when you are broken, it will take your woman in a way that you never could.

“F. from behind? I don’t know, man; I’m just a chemical process.”

Also remember to CHECK. THE. FUCKING. FLUIDS. Don’t just stare at the engine with your dick in your hand, wondering if you could stop the flywheel with your cock (no matter how awesome it would be to seize a V8 with nothing but your willpower and steely erection, this is not the time for it). Pull those dipsticks out and check the reservoirs. Brake fluid is, in an ideal world, clear to slightly yellowish. But the world we live in is broken and flawed, so it’s usually tea-colored. If it looks like strong coffee, you’re going to need to bleed the brake system, at the very least. That’s a few hundred dollars right there. It doesn’t require a lot of know-how or expensive parts, so you’re going to want to do it yourself.

Do not.

Bleeding brakes is exactly as traumatic as bleeding your only child, only it takes like, four times as long (depending on size and age of child). Check the oil: If it looks like a Wendy’s chocolate Frosty, just turn around and run. Run as fast as you can. Hop into your car and tear ass out of that dealership like The Dukes of Hazzard. That means a blown head-gasket, and it is death. If somebody assures you, “It’ll still run,” you can respond, “So will a man with no legs, if you shoot at him enough; that doesn’t mean he’ll get far.” (The casual murder references let ’em know you mean business.)

“Hi, Bob. Nice to meet you. I’ve killed four men. Every one of them stole from me.”

Make sure the coolant is clear, the transmission fluid is red or purplish (just not black or oily) and all the belts and hoses are free of cracks. Finally, if it’s a new car or a big expense, you buy yourself a copy of a program like Torque, then go on eBay and get an ODBII scanner. Plug that into the car (the ODB slot is usually beneath the dash on the driver’s side) and you can see literally everything about its engine in real time, right there on your smartphone. Do me a favor and look at the salesman’s face when you do it: See that expression? That’s what hope looks like, as it leaves the world. He’s just realized he’s not going to win this one, because you’re from the future — you’ve already done this deal.


Car LED Lights – Information you need to know about Car LED Lights #local #used #car #dealerships


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Understanding Car LED Lights

This article about Car LED Lights explains about the benefits and uses of Car LED Lights.

Car LED lights are a great way to help your car stand out in the crowds and be unique. While they are great for decoration, there are also ways that car LED lights can be functional. When you learn about the many ways to make use of car LED lights, you’ll wonder why you never tried them before.

As you may already know, there have been many developments in lighting technology recently. These advancements mean that we are now getting bigger and better lighting options than ever before. This is where LED lights come in because they have consistently provided high quality lights for some time now and they continue to be used in a variety of places.

Car LED lights are just one of the many places that are using the LED technology. Understanding car LED lights will help you to make your own decisions about car lights and which LEDs are right for your needs. It can help you to see the many uses of these lights and be sure you are using them properly. It will also help you if you are in the market for buying car LED lights and you want some help in knowing what to choose.

We now have LED car lights to help us with automobile lighting needs. They serve two main purposes as functional and decorative. Sometimes LED lights for your car can serve both functions with the same lighting. The LED lights found in your car stereo would be one example of these. The lights are used to find the station and function you want to use when traveling at night and the color of the lights are designed to provide a soft glow in the vehicle that is not distracting.

Some light emitting diodes are tiny enough to fit into circuit boards which supply a variety of lighting needs. These are the lights that serve a functional purpose and they usually appear in the dashboard. Some of these include the fasten your seat belt light and the low fuel light that lets you know when you’re close to running out of gasoline. Some of the other lights that falls into this category include the oil light indicator, heat light, engine light and many cars have lights for the airbags.

Signal lights, emergency lights, brake lights and some headlights are all LED lights that are considered vital parts of the vehicle. These are needed to help convey the intentions of each driver to the other drivers on the road to help prevent accidents and to help you see where you’re going. Now that you know some of the important things that car LED lights are used for it’s time to learn about a few of the decorative options.

Two of the most popular decorative options available are the LED lights used to accent car wheels and the running lights that are attached along the sides of the car. Both of these create color and add a little pizzazz to any vehicle. Car LED lights have helped to revolutionize the automobile industry and they will surly continue to make quite an impact in the future as well.


What You Need To Know About A Short Term, 3 Month Car Lease #enterprize #car #rental


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What You Need To Know About A Short Term, 3 Month Car Lease

People choose to lease a car for many reasons, such as traveling for work or for personal use. If you need a car short-term, such as a 3 month car lease, there are several things to consider.

Short term car lease offers can be hard to come by, generally a dealer will prefer to lease a car for a standard lease term of 24 month or more. Because of this, any available short-term lease deals will usually have much higher monthly costs when compared to a typical lease.

Here are a few things to know about short-term leases and lease take overs. Keep the following in mind, should you lease a new car and want to transfer the lease to another person:

  • Leasing a car for shorter periods of time, such as a 3 month lease, most often means you’ll end up renting – which can be more costly versus a long-term lease. It may work out cheaper to just lease a car for a standard lease term, find out what deals are available in your area by requesting your free, no obligation lease price quote .
  • A lease takeover or assumption means you’ll assume complete responsibility for monthly payments – driving the car for the rest of the lease term and returning it to the dealership/financing agency. Often this is not a favorable deal, because the monthly payments will be too expensive.
  • The downside to assuming a lease is that the car you’re leasing is no longer brand new. Depending on the driving habits of the previous driver, you could end up with a poorly maintained car – possibly even paying extra for wear and tear, or mileage fees at the end of the lease term.

  • 3 Month Lease Deals are Hard To Come By- Find Standard Lease Deals Near You!

    • The first thing to do is determine the type of car that will meet your needs and priorities. By evaluating what is most important to you in a car, you’ll be able to select the style to best meet your needs.
  • Request a free, no obligation lease price quote to see the short-term lease specials being offered by local dealerships. You will be able to see which dealerships in your area will offer you special incentives on standard leases that could work out cheaper than a 3 month lease.
  • Think about the total leasing costs for the lease term. Estimate anticipated gas mileage, insurance and leasing fees. Evaluate the rates for different classes of cars – it’s possibly a different class will give you a lower overall cost.
  • Request a free new car lease quote now to find the best lease deals in your area, you’ll be surprised at the offers that could work out to being better than a 3 month leasing offer. Learn everything you need to know, so you can negotiate with confidence for the best car lease price possible.


    Things to Know about a Rebuilt Car Title. #nationwide #car #insurance


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    Things to Know about a Rebuilt Car Title

    What is a Rebuilt Car Title?

    Usually, to get a rebuilt car title. a car has gone through some event that caused extensive damage, and has been rebuilt to a drivable state. A rebuilt title, also known as a salvage title or reconstructed title, is used to inform the consumer of a vehicle s history. Rules may vary from state to state, but once a car has been titled as salvage, it will appear in a history report as such; even if the car is titled in different states. A rebuilt title significantly reduces the value of a used car, and there are two primary ways a car can be given a salvage title.

    Insurance Total Loss

    An Insurance total loss can cover accidents, natural disasters and theft. This occurs when the insurance company deems that the repairs to the vehicle are not economically practical. For instance, if the blue book value of a vehicle is $12,000, and the repair estimates are $10,500, the insurance company may pay the claimant blue book value rather than having the car repaired. In matters of theft, a salvage title may be issued for a vehicle that is recovered after a claim has been paid, even though damage may be minimal.

    Impounded and Seized Vehicles

    Sometimes seized, impounded or unclaimed vehicles may be given a salvage title in order to be sold to junk yards, repair shops or auction houses. In these cases vehicle damage, unpaid repairs or storage fees may exceed the value of the car. The vehicles are sold as salvage to recoup some of the costs. Titling the car salvage significantly reduces the price of the car.

    Buying a Car with a Rebuilt Title

    Buying a car with a rebuilt title should be considered carefully. Some states require minimal inspections to declare a rebuilt car road-worthy, while others are more thorough. Check with the local Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) for questions regarding these inspections. It is highly recommended that any rebuilt car be inspected by a certified mechanic and even a reputable body shop.


    Everything You Need To Know About Rental Car Insurance #cash #for #junk #cars


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    Everything You Need To Know About Rental Car Insurance

    Getty

    Renting a car? Buying the over-the-counter insurance that rental car companies sell could be the dumbest move you’ve made all day. That is, unless it’s the smartest.

    The question is, are you covered? Too many travelers have no idea, and it’s in that cone of uncertainty that the rental car companies are able to pounce and profit.

    If you don’t know, for example, what your liability coverage your own auto insurance policy provides, or whether or not your credit card is any use in times of rental car trouble, then why, the agent will be asking you, would you want to drive off the lot without peace of mind? Why indeed.

    Trouble is, peace of mind doesn’t come cheap. Think hundreds of dollars added to your weekly rental costs, which are already skyrocketing, as competition goes all but extinct in the more-consolidated-than-ever rental car industry. It’s war, and you’ve got to be ready to do battle. We’re here to help. Are you the owner of a car?

    Yes? Great. Then you probably have an insurance policy. You’ll say this to the guy behind the counter. He’ll counter with: Do you know if your coverage is adequate? Are you going to be stuck with a huge deductible? They’ll throw it all at you. And if you can’t answer the questions confidently, suddenly, you’ll be wondering: Hey! Maybe I should be buying the insurance here, because, really, what if something happens and I’m not covered? Stop. Stop it right now. Before you leave home, examine your policy documents or call your insurance provider and ask. Questions like: Am I covered for damage, theft and loss of use? Liability for injury to others (personal and property) while in the rental car? Personal effects if stolen or damaged? How screwed am I, as regards deductibles and such, if I find myself in any trouble related to the above? You should know the answers to all of these questions.

    Coverage through your credit card? Maybe. Probably not.

    Too many people think that their auto insurance policy plus their credit card coverage benefits equals all set. Again – maybe you are, maybe you’re not. Have you read the documents? Too many renters learn the hard way that what most cards provide is “secondary” coverage, meant only to bulk up your auto insurance policy, paying out after that has been exhausted. Your Visa card, for example, can be a great asset, but if you don’t follow all their rules (the coverage may be invalid if you rent a mid-size car in Cincinnati on a Tuesday when it’s raining), the very thing you think is going to keep you out of trouble might end up leaving you in a world of hurt. Across the board, it’s wrong (really, really wrong) to assume that one size of coverage fits all card brands. Some higher-end Mastercards might be great, for example. Others card levels may offer little protection. Examine each card document carefully. Finally, note that credit cards tend to mostly offer collision, damage and theft coverage, if they offer anything at all – personal liability (hitting a pedestrian, crashing into a store front, or injuring drivers in another car) and personal effects are generally your problem. Again: Read.

    So you’ve got nothing.

    Say you go over both your auto insurance policy and your credit card documents, hundreds of time. Say you now fully accept that rental car-wise, you’re less than protected. Don’t just wing it – winging it can lead to all kinds of trouble, such as you being stuck with a bill for thousands of dollars or a huge jury award. Besides upgrading your credit card to something more useful and bulking up on your auto insurance you can also sign up for primary coverage with a third party (but again, this will only be coverage for damage to the rental car, it’s not personal liability coverage).

    What is this “primary coverage with a third party?”

    Simply: It is a separate policy that protects you when you rent cars. Maybe you are protected with your credit card and your auto insurance policy, but if you get into an accident and have primary coverage elsewhere, you can leave your insurer out of the loop entirely, avoiding any potential rate increases. American Express cardholders can purchase a Premium Rental Car Protection policy for less than the cost of one day’s damage waiver in many destinations. For $24.95 per rental period of up to 42 days — $17.95 if you live in California – you’ve got $100,000 in coverage for damage and theft, plus $100,000 of Accidental Death or Dismemberment coverage, $15,000 for excess medical expenses and up to $5,000 for personal property loss. The real deal here? No deductible. Nada. It’s a good policy. Best of all, it kicks in automatically when you begin your rental using that card. When you do, you’ll be surprised at how easy it is to stop agents in their tracks – most know about the policy. Tell them you’ve got it and they’ll generally understand that they’re dealing with someone who has come prepared.

    But what about other liability?

    As long as any accidents involve just you and, say, a lamppost, you’re now well and truly protected. Bump into a billionaire in a supermarket parking lot, however, and you may not be adequately protected, liability-wise. Many drivers lack the proper liability protection, often assuming that that they’re safe, hiding behind their homeowners or renters policies. More than once, after hearing about all the coverage we’ve got, the rental car agent has asked the question, “What about liability?” While rental car companies are required to build basic (and limited) liability protection into their rates, they won’t tell you this. Generally, you’re going to be fine in a fender bender situation, but if you find yourself in some horrible scenario where you can be sued for lots of money, then make sure you are covered (if you’re a high net worth individual, you probably have an umbrella liability policy, which should be enough, but check with your agent). For those that are not covered, the agent will be happy to sell you Supplemental Liability Protection, often quite reasonably priced at about $10 per day. Then again, liability protection isn’t something you should be sorting out on the fly with some kid at the Enterprise counter – this is a matter for your insurance broker.


    What You Need to Know About Renting a Car #car #service


    #renting a car
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    What You Need to Know About

    Renting a Car

    June 2010

    A little prep will help you hold the line on nuisance charges and fees.

    By Thomas M. Anderson, Associate Editor

    Editor’s Note: This story has been updated since its original publication.

    1. Get ahead of the curve. Your goal is not to pay for insurance you already have. So before you hit the rental desk, find out what coverage your auto policy and credit-card benefits provide. First, call your insurer. Then call the toll-free number on the credit card you’ll use to pay for the rental.

    2. Who covers what. Your auto policy generally covers rental-car damage. If, however, you’ve dropped comprehensive or collision coverage on your car, the rental car will not be covered if it is stolen or damaged in an accident. Your credit-card benefits supplement your auto coverage. Most cards will pick up your deductible, and premium cards offer beefier coverage. But credit-card protection doesn’t include liability.

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    3. You may not need extra insurance. The clerk behind the desk will offer you a collision damage waiver (sometimes called a loss damage waiver), which can cost $10 to $20 per day. The CDW shields you if the rental car is damaged or stolen. But as long as the rental is for personal use and you have collision coverage, your own insurance will cover the rental (with the same deductibles that apply to your own car).

    4. But it could come in handy. Even if you have coverage through your auto insurance, you may want to take the CDW. It will help you avoid the hassle of your insurer’s claims process and keep an accident off your record. Plus, car-rental agencies have been slapping customers with hefty “loss of use” and administrative fees. Most states do not include “loss of use” coverage in their standard auto policies; only Connecticut, Louisiana, Minnesota, New York, North Dakota, Rhode Island and Texas require such coverage. Caveat: By accepting the waiver from the rental-car company, you void the terms of your credit card’s insurance benefits.

    5. It gets complicated overseas. Generally, your auto insurance does not cover you when you rent a car abroad, although some policies may apply when you drive in Canada and Mexico (check with your insurer). Many credit-card companies withhold coverage in countries with lousy accident records. For example, American Express and MasterCard exclude Australia, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Jamaica and New Zealand. Of the countries on that list, Visa takes issue with Ireland, Israel and Jamaica.

    6. Bring your own GPS. Rental-car companies will nickel-and-dime you for bonus equipment, such as GPS units, which can cost $12 per day, and child car seats, about $10 per day. Bring your own digital music player and connectors to use as an alternative to satellite radio ($3 per day).

    7. Gas up on your own. If you are in a hurry, paying for a full tank of gas ahead of time will save you the hassle of filling up on the way to the airport. But if you plan ahead, you can locate cheaper gas than the rate quoted at the counter. Plus, unless you expect to run through a full tank on your trip, you might be paying for fuel you don’t use.

    8. Help move the fleet. You might get a seasonal deal if you drive a rental one way from Florida (because you’re helping the company move equipment). In April, Alamo offered one-way rentals from Florida to any other state in the continental U.S. for as little as $10 per day.