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Holden Australia – Discover New Possibilities, holden cars.#Holden #cars


holden cars

Holden cars Holden cars

New Astra Family

Holden cars Holden cars

Barina

Holden cars Holden cars

Captiva

Holden cars Holden cars

Colorado

Holden cars Holden cars

Commodore

Holden cars Holden cars

Spark

Holden cars Holden cars

Trailblazer

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Holden cars Holden cars

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2018 – Commodore

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2018 – Commodore Tourer

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GM s Holden to stop making cars in Australia – BBC News #car #shop


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GM’s Holden to stop making cars in Australia

11 December 2013

Image caption Holden said a small domestic market was among the reasons behind its decision

Holden, a subsidiary of General Motors (GM), has said it will stop making cars in Australia by the end of 2017.

The move will result in nearly 2,900 people losing their jobs.

The firm said a strong Australian currency, high manufacturing costs and a small domestic market were among the reasons behind its decision.

Holden, which has made cars in Australia for nearly 65 years, will retain its sales unit and a parts distribution centre in Australia.

“The decision to end manufacturing in Australia reflects the perfect storm of negative influences the automotive industry faces in the country,” GM chief executive Dan Akerson said in a statement.

“This includes the sustained strength of the Australian dollar, high cost of production, small domestic market and arguably the most competitive and fragmented auto market in the world.”

Subsidies

Carmakers in Australia have been struggling for some time, despite the government extending support to the industry via subsidies over the past few years.

Analysis

By Puneet Pal Singh Business Reporter, BBC News

Holden has been an iconic brand in Australia. In fact, it personified the Australian car industry for decades.

Unfortunately, its latest move is also symbolic of the issues faced, not just by it, but the sector overall.

One of the biggest headaches has been the strong Australian currency, which has risen nearly 30% against the US dollar over the past five years.

That has made foreign-made cars cheaper for Australian consumers. According to various estimates, nearly 85% of cars sold in the country are imported.

A relatively small domestic market means that local manufacturers are left competing for an even smaller share, which is proving insufficient to sustain their growth.

The numbers of cars made in Australia has halved over the past 30 years, and with Holden ceasing its production in 2017, some fear the entire sector may crumble.

Holden’s exit will leave Toyota as the sole manufacturer in Australia and until things change drastically, the fear is that the Japanese firm may also go looking for greener pastures.

A weak Japanese yen, which makes exports from Japan cheaper, coupled with a strong Australian dollar may just deliver the knock-out punch for the Australian car industry.

However, there has been a debate over whether the government should continue to provide support to the sector.

According to the Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC), Prime Minister Tony Abbott declared last week that there would be no more taxpayer assistance.

The government had also increased pressure on Holden in recent days to clarify its future plans for Australia.

Dave Smith, national secretary of the vehicle division at Australian Manufacturing Workers Union, said the government’s push had influenced Holden’s move.

“I believe the decision’s been prompted by the behaviour of the government yesterday,” he told the ABC.

“Unfortunately, they’ve been let down by a government that wouldn’t back them in.”

Wider implications

In May, US carmaker Ford announced that it would stop production in Australia in 2016.

That means Holden’s decision will leave Japanese carmaker Toyota as the only company still making cars in Australia from 2017.

The Australian Manufacturing Workers Union said it was now “highly likely” Toyota could decide to leave Australia as well.

“In fact, it’s almost certain and this will spell the end of 50,000 automotive jobs,” Mr Smith said. “There’s no dispute about that.”

The Motor Trade Association of South Australia said the government needed to take steps to ensure a sustainable future for the sector.

“Our attention must now go to those component manufacturers and Toyota, and the federal government must immediately begin working on plans to keep this important manufacturing base in Australia,” said John Chapman, chief executive of the association.

Treasurer Joe Hockey said the government would work closely with the state governments and unions to ensure Holden’s departure “does not lead to a significant economic downturn in South Australia or Victoria”, where the firm’s two manufacturing units are based.

“We will do everything to help in this transition,” he added.

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Holden confirms it will leave Australia in 2017 #car #sales #jobs


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Holden confirms it will leave Australia in 2017

GM Holden will cease producing cars in Australia from 2017, putting 2,900 employees out of work and Australia’s remaining car and components industry and its 45,000 workers in immediate danger.

“The decision to end manufacturing in Australia reflects the perfect storm of negative influences the automotive industry faces in the country, including the sustained strength of the Australian dollar, high cost of production, small domestic market and arguably the most competitive and fragmented auto market in the world,” GM Holden’s chairman, Dan Akerson, said.

In a statement from Detroit, Holden said “approximately 2,900 positions will be impacted over the next four years. This will comprise 1,600 from the Elizabeth vehicle manufacturing plant [in South Australia] and approximately 1,300 from Holden’s Victorian workforce.

Toyota’s response to Holden’s announcement exacerbated fears that the decision could have a knock-on effect. “This will place unprecedented pressure on the local supplier network and our ability to build cars in Australia,” the company said. “We will now work with our suppliers, key stakeholders and the government to determine our next steps and whether we can continue operating as the sole vehicle manufacturer in Australia.”

Holden’s chief executive in Australia, Mike Devereux, said: “This has been a difficult decision given Holden’s long and proud history of building vehicles in Australia.

“We are dedicated to working with our teams, unions and the local communities, along with the federal and state governments, to support our people.”

The Abbott government had attacked Holden for failing to immediately clarify its long-term intentions in Australia, even though the industry minister, Ian Macfarlane, had commissioned the Productivity Commission to report by next March on what ongoing subsidies should be provided to car makers – something Holden said it needed to know before committing to produce another model in Australia.

“We regret the fact that General Motors will phase down its operations … Holden has been an iconic national brand and part of our heritage. many of us have had the pleasure of travelling and owning Australian-built Holdens and it is a pity that will not continue,” the acting prime minister, Warren Truss, told parliament as he broke the news shortly after the beginning of question time.

The treasurer, Joe Hockey, said the government would work with the state governments, the unions and the company to ensure the closure “does not lead to a significant downturn in South Australia and Victoria”.

The company received $1.8bn in government assistance between 2001 and 2012, but said that generated $32.7 billion in economic activity.

Mitsubishi pulled out of Australia in 2008 and Ford will end production in 2016.

Hockey said the fact that Mitsubishi and Ford announced they were pulling out of Australia during Labor’s term in office proved government funding was not “the issue” and the assistant minister for employment, Luke Hartsuyker, said immediate job-seeking support would be provided to workers who lost their jobs.

Macfarlane, who had previously argued for ongoing support for the car industry, said Labor governments had “laid the foundations” for the car industry’s failure.

But Labor’s industry spokesman, Kim Carr, said in a tweet: The Abbott government has succeeded in forcing Holden out of Australia. Workers have been sacrificed for reckless Coalition policy.

Both Hockey and the education minister, Christopher Pyne, said labour costs were a significant factor in the Australian car industry’s lack of competitiveness, blaming the unionised workforce.

In its statement, Holden said it would still have a national sales company, a parts distribution centre and a design studio in Australia after 2017, and that sales and service of Holden cars would be unaffected.

It said the high Australian dollar was a major factor it its decision, pointing out that at its peak, the level of the dollar meant Australian manufacturing was 65% more expensive compared with a decade earlier.

Speaking to journalists about the decision, Devereux said: “There is no question this is a difficult day not just for Holden but for the country … we have been part of the industrialisation of this country.”

But he said the company had determined on Tuesday afternoon, shortly after he had reassured the Productivity Commission that no decision had been made, that “building cars in this country is just not sustainable”.

He refused to answer questions about what level of government assistance could have convinced the company to stay, saying only “we understand the point of view of the government of the day”.

“Make no mistake we have looked at every possible option to build our next generation cars here in this country … no matter which way we applied the numbers our long-term business case … was simply not viable,” he said.

But the national secretary of the Australian Manufacturing Workers’ Union vehicle division, Dave Smith, said the government could easily have prevented the closure by continuing the deal Labor had struck with Holden before the election.

“They could have stopped this, absolutely they could have stopped this. they just decided they weren’t interested in these jobs. They should apologise and they should hang their heads in shame,” he said.

Smith said Toyota had told him the Holden decision would mean its operation would become unviable.

Labor acting leader, Tanya Plibersek, said the government had “goaded and dared Holden to pull out” and had now “got its way”. She said the decision, which could easily have been avoided, could cost 200,000 jobs when workers who depended on the car industry were taken into account.

The South Australian premier, Jay Weatherill, said it was a “black day for South Australia” and accused the Abbott government of “turning its back on the industry and the people in it”.

The Victorian premier, Denis Napthine, said he had been advised it was an “irrevocable decision” and that it was a “very, very sad day for Australia and Victoria”.


Holden Cars – Specifications, Prices, Pictures @ Top Speed #car #sales.com


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2016 Holden Commodore VFII

So this latest facelift of the Holden Commodore will be its last, and Holden even threw it a party in order to send it off in style. Thirty examples of the car, dating back to 1978, were gathered in Port Melbourne to announce the debut of the VFII. As the name implies, the VFII is not a separate generation from the VF (Holden gives each generation a letter designation), but rather a refreshed version to keep the car from going stale during the last couple of years of its life. It looks great too, making it all the more unfortunate that it s going away.

Chris Harris Reviews the HSV Maloo GTS: Video

Even when he’s on holiday, Chris Harris still can’t resist the intoxicating allure of getting behind the wheel of a car, especially a car with the kind of quirky package that the HSV Maloo GTS offers. Actually, “quirky” isn’t even an appropriate word to describe Australia’s famous super ute. The Maloo GTS is a “firecracker with a flatbed.” During his recent vacation in Australia, Harris managed to get his hands on one after getting coaxed by Australia s Wheels magazine, and like he always does, Harris didn’t hesitate putting the Maloo GTS’ four wheels to the ground.

In the end, Harris nailed it when he called the Maloo GTS an ingenious creation by HSV. You probably won’t see anything else quite like it, unless of course some of Europe’s biggest brands decide to jump on the “super ute” bandwagon.


GM s Holden to stop making cars in Australia – BBC News #car #trawler


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#

GM’s Holden to stop making cars in Australia

11 December 2013

Image caption Holden said a small domestic market was among the reasons behind its decision

Holden, a subsidiary of General Motors (GM), has said it will stop making cars in Australia by the end of 2017.

The move will result in nearly 2,900 people losing their jobs.

The firm said a strong Australian currency, high manufacturing costs and a small domestic market were among the reasons behind its decision.

Holden, which has made cars in Australia for nearly 65 years, will retain its sales unit and a parts distribution centre in Australia.

“The decision to end manufacturing in Australia reflects the perfect storm of negative influences the automotive industry faces in the country,” GM chief executive Dan Akerson said in a statement.

“This includes the sustained strength of the Australian dollar, high cost of production, small domestic market and arguably the most competitive and fragmented auto market in the world.”

Subsidies

Carmakers in Australia have been struggling for some time, despite the government extending support to the industry via subsidies over the past few years.

Analysis

By Puneet Pal Singh Business Reporter, BBC News

Holden has been an iconic brand in Australia. In fact, it personified the Australian car industry for decades.

Unfortunately, its latest move is also symbolic of the issues faced, not just by it, but the sector overall.

One of the biggest headaches has been the strong Australian currency, which has risen nearly 30% against the US dollar over the past five years.

That has made foreign-made cars cheaper for Australian consumers. According to various estimates, nearly 85% of cars sold in the country are imported.

A relatively small domestic market means that local manufacturers are left competing for an even smaller share, which is proving insufficient to sustain their growth.

The numbers of cars made in Australia has halved over the past 30 years, and with Holden ceasing its production in 2017, some fear the entire sector may crumble.

Holden’s exit will leave Toyota as the sole manufacturer in Australia and until things change drastically, the fear is that the Japanese firm may also go looking for greener pastures.

A weak Japanese yen, which makes exports from Japan cheaper, coupled with a strong Australian dollar may just deliver the knock-out punch for the Australian car industry.

However, there has been a debate over whether the government should continue to provide support to the sector.

According to the Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC), Prime Minister Tony Abbott declared last week that there would be no more taxpayer assistance.

The government had also increased pressure on Holden in recent days to clarify its future plans for Australia.

Dave Smith, national secretary of the vehicle division at Australian Manufacturing Workers Union, said the government’s push had influenced Holden’s move.

“I believe the decision’s been prompted by the behaviour of the government yesterday,” he told the ABC.

“Unfortunately, they’ve been let down by a government that wouldn’t back them in.”

Wider implications

In May, US carmaker Ford announced that it would stop production in Australia in 2016.

That means Holden’s decision will leave Japanese carmaker Toyota as the only company still making cars in Australia from 2017.

The Australian Manufacturing Workers Union said it was now “highly likely” Toyota could decide to leave Australia as well.

“In fact, it’s almost certain and this will spell the end of 50,000 automotive jobs,” Mr Smith said. “There’s no dispute about that.”

The Motor Trade Association of South Australia said the government needed to take steps to ensure a sustainable future for the sector.

“Our attention must now go to those component manufacturers and Toyota, and the federal government must immediately begin working on plans to keep this important manufacturing base in Australia,” said John Chapman, chief executive of the association.

Treasurer Joe Hockey said the government would work closely with the state governments and unions to ensure Holden’s departure “does not lead to a significant economic downturn in South Australia or Victoria”, where the firm’s two manufacturing units are based.

“We will do everything to help in this transition,” he added.

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Holden confirms it will leave Australia in 2017 #2010 #cars


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Holden confirms it will leave Australia in 2017

GM Holden will cease producing cars in Australia from 2017, putting 2,900 employees out of work and Australia’s remaining car and components industry and its 45,000 workers in immediate danger.

“The decision to end manufacturing in Australia reflects the perfect storm of negative influences the automotive industry faces in the country, including the sustained strength of the Australian dollar, high cost of production, small domestic market and arguably the most competitive and fragmented auto market in the world,” GM Holden’s chairman, Dan Akerson, said.

In a statement from Detroit, Holden said “approximately 2,900 positions will be impacted over the next four years. This will comprise 1,600 from the Elizabeth vehicle manufacturing plant [in South Australia] and approximately 1,300 from Holden’s Victorian workforce.

Toyota’s response to Holden’s announcement exacerbated fears that the decision could have a knock-on effect. “This will place unprecedented pressure on the local supplier network and our ability to build cars in Australia,” the company said. “We will now work with our suppliers, key stakeholders and the government to determine our next steps and whether we can continue operating as the sole vehicle manufacturer in Australia.”

Holden’s chief executive in Australia, Mike Devereux, said: “This has been a difficult decision given Holden’s long and proud history of building vehicles in Australia.

“We are dedicated to working with our teams, unions and the local communities, along with the federal and state governments, to support our people.”

The Abbott government had attacked Holden for failing to immediately clarify its long-term intentions in Australia, even though the industry minister, Ian Macfarlane, had commissioned the Productivity Commission to report by next March on what ongoing subsidies should be provided to car makers – something Holden said it needed to know before committing to produce another model in Australia.

“We regret the fact that General Motors will phase down its operations … Holden has been an iconic national brand and part of our heritage. many of us have had the pleasure of travelling and owning Australian-built Holdens and it is a pity that will not continue,” the acting prime minister, Warren Truss, told parliament as he broke the news shortly after the beginning of question time.

The treasurer, Joe Hockey, said the government would work with the state governments, the unions and the company to ensure the closure “does not lead to a significant downturn in South Australia and Victoria”.

The company received $1.8bn in government assistance between 2001 and 2012, but said that generated $32.7 billion in economic activity.

Mitsubishi pulled out of Australia in 2008 and Ford will end production in 2016.

Hockey said the fact that Mitsubishi and Ford announced they were pulling out of Australia during Labor’s term in office proved government funding was not “the issue” and the assistant minister for employment, Luke Hartsuyker, said immediate job-seeking support would be provided to workers who lost their jobs.

Macfarlane, who had previously argued for ongoing support for the car industry, said Labor governments had “laid the foundations” for the car industry’s failure.

But Labor’s industry spokesman, Kim Carr, said in a tweet: The Abbott government has succeeded in forcing Holden out of Australia. Workers have been sacrificed for reckless Coalition policy.

Both Hockey and the education minister, Christopher Pyne, said labour costs were a significant factor in the Australian car industry’s lack of competitiveness, blaming the unionised workforce.

In its statement, Holden said it would still have a national sales company, a parts distribution centre and a design studio in Australia after 2017, and that sales and service of Holden cars would be unaffected.

It said the high Australian dollar was a major factor it its decision, pointing out that at its peak, the level of the dollar meant Australian manufacturing was 65% more expensive compared with a decade earlier.

Speaking to journalists about the decision, Devereux said: “There is no question this is a difficult day not just for Holden but for the country … we have been part of the industrialisation of this country.”

But he said the company had determined on Tuesday afternoon, shortly after he had reassured the Productivity Commission that no decision had been made, that “building cars in this country is just not sustainable”.

He refused to answer questions about what level of government assistance could have convinced the company to stay, saying only “we understand the point of view of the government of the day”.

“Make no mistake we have looked at every possible option to build our next generation cars here in this country … no matter which way we applied the numbers our long-term business case … was simply not viable,” he said.

But the national secretary of the Australian Manufacturing Workers’ Union vehicle division, Dave Smith, said the government could easily have prevented the closure by continuing the deal Labor had struck with Holden before the election.

“They could have stopped this, absolutely they could have stopped this. they just decided they weren’t interested in these jobs. They should apologise and they should hang their heads in shame,” he said.

Smith said Toyota had told him the Holden decision would mean its operation would become unviable.

Labor acting leader, Tanya Plibersek, said the government had “goaded and dared Holden to pull out” and had now “got its way”. She said the decision, which could easily have been avoided, could cost 200,000 jobs when workers who depended on the car industry were taken into account.

The South Australian premier, Jay Weatherill, said it was a “black day for South Australia” and accused the Abbott government of “turning its back on the industry and the people in it”.

The Victorian premier, Denis Napthine, said he had been advised it was an “irrevocable decision” and that it was a “very, very sad day for Australia and Victoria”.


Holden Cars #car #insurances


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VF Commodore to replace VE Commodore

Holden’s most popular Commodore ever to be replaced this year.

The popular VE Holden Commodore will say goodbye late in 2010

Holden will roll out its new “VF” Commodore later this year (2010), as the company makes plans to cut production of the VE Commodore earlier than first thought. Holden will reportedly shut down its Adelaide assembly plant for 13 days in July and August as it begins to phase out the current model VE Commodore. Ahead of updating our locally produced Commodore range later this year, we need to prepare for a smooth run out of the current model within the plant, a Holden spokesperson said. To do this, we have been working with the union to balance short-term manufacturing plans that will allow us to taper production of the current range, before ramping up with the new model.

2010 VE Holden Commodore Omega

Todays 2010 VE Holden Commodore Omega leads the race to be Australia s top selling family sedan.


Holden Cars Information and Pics #car #rental #montreal


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Prime Minister Ben Chifley launches the 48-215 (FX) Holden

Holden Cars have become iconic motor vehicles in Australia since 1948. The Holden family history since 1854 and the development of  todays General Motors Holden are featured. Classic Holden Cars. looks at the company development and growth in Australia along with information and pics of every Holden from the first Holden manufactured in Australia, the 48-215 FX (1948) to the 2006 VE Commodore. You will find production numbers, the base price on introduction to the marketplace and as many pics we could find.

Holden 48-215 Emblem

Holden has a special place in Australia’s history as the manufacturer of the first all-Australian car, the 48-215 (FX). Since 1948, when the famous 48-215 took to the road, a succession of landmark models have driven themselves so deeply into the Australian way of life that they have become an integral part of it.

Along the way, the Holden name has acquired a significance and status all of its own, symbolised by a spirit of strength, ingenuity and adaptability.

Today, Holden employs more than 6300 people Australia wide and has produced more than seven million vehicles. As part of General Motors. the world’s largest automotive company since 1931, Holden is evolving from a domestic manufacturer into an internationally competitive exporter of vehicles, engines and automotive expertise to diverse markets.

Holden’s major operating facilities are located at Fishermans Bend (technical centre, administration and engine manufacturing plants), Dandenong (spare parts operation) and Lang Lang (automotive proving ground)  in Victoria; as well as Elizabeth (vehicle manufacturing plant) in South Australia.

Although Holden Cars of the future will change in profile, be  powered by different engines and introduce ever more innovative features, the process of change generated through such initiatives will be forever linked to the company’s heritage by the Holden Car Lion Emblem displayed proudly on its products.


Holden Cars #my #car #check


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VF Commodore to replace VE Commodore

Holden’s most popular Commodore ever to be replaced this year.

The popular VE Holden Commodore will say goodbye late in 2010

Holden will roll out its new “VF” Commodore later this year (2010), as the company makes plans to cut production of the VE Commodore earlier than first thought. Holden will reportedly shut down its Adelaide assembly plant for 13 days in July and August as it begins to phase out the current model VE Commodore. Ahead of updating our locally produced Commodore range later this year, we need to prepare for a smooth run out of the current model within the plant, a Holden spokesperson said. To do this, we have been working with the union to balance short-term manufacturing plans that will allow us to taper production of the current range, before ramping up with the new model.

2010 VE Holden Commodore Omega

Todays 2010 VE Holden Commodore Omega leads the race to be Australia s top selling family sedan.