About Attic Ventilation #home, #house, #improvement, #energy, #efficiency, #star, #energystar, #audit, #remodel, #insulation, #kitchen, #windows, #foam, #attic, #sealing, #basement


#

About Attic Ventilation

Natural Attic Ventilation

At first it may seem odd to add insulation for warmth and then purposely allow cold air to enter the attic through vents, but this combination is the key to a durable and energy-efficient home. Here’s why: in the winter, allowing a natural flow of outdoor air to ventilate the attic helps keep it cold, which reduces the potential for ice damming (snow that melts off a roof from an attic that is too warm and then re-freezes at the gutters, causing an ice dam that can damage the roof). Proper insulation and air sealing also keeps attics cold in winter by blocking the entry of heat and moist air from below. In the summer, natural air flow in a well-vented attic moves super-heated air out of the attic, protecting roof shingles and removing moisture. The insulation will resist heat transfer into the house.

The most common mistake homeowners make when installing insulation is to block the flow of air at the eaves. NEVER COVER ATTIC SOFFIT VENTS WITH INSULATION use rafter vents and soffit vents to maintain airflow.

Attic Fan Ventilation

Attic fans are intended to cool hot attics by drawing in cooler outside air from attic vents (soffit and gable) and pushing hot air to the outside. However, if your attic has blocked soffit vents and is not well-sealed from the rest of the house, attic fans will suck cool conditioned air up out of the house and into the attic. This will use more energy and make your air conditioner work harder, which will increase your summer utility bill.

You don’t want your unfinished attic cooled by your air conditioner. To prevent this, follow the air sealing and insulation strategies in this guide and make sure the attic is well-ventilated using passive vents and natural air flow.

Doing the Job

Laying fiberglass rolls is easiest for a DIY job. If you have any type of insulation between the rafters, install the second layer over and perpendicular to the first (again, the second layer of roll insulation should be unfaced with no vapor retarder). This will help cover the tops of the joists and reduce heat loss or gain through the frame. Also, when laying down additional insulation, work from the perimeter toward the attic opening. Never lay insulation over recessed light fixtures or soffit vents. Keep all insulation at least 3 inches away from “can” lights, unless they are rated IC (Insulated Ceiling). If you are using loose fill insulation, use sheet metal to create barriers around the openings. If using fiberglass, wire mesh can be used to create a barrier.

For additional details and images, download the DIY Guide (12.7MB).

Installing Rafter Vents

To completely cover your attic floor with insulation out to the eaves you need to install rafter vents (also called insulation baffles). Complete coverage of the attic floor along with sealing air leaks will ensure you get the best performance from your insulation. Rafter vents ensure the soffit vents are clear and there is a channel for outside air to move into the attic at the soffits and out through the gable or ridge vent. To install the rafter vents, staple them directly to the roof decking. Rafter vents come in 4-foot lengths and 14-1/2 and 22-1/2 inch widths for different rafter spacings. Rafter vents should be placed in your attic ceiling in between the rafters at the point where your attic ceiling meets your attic floor.

Once they are in place, you can then place the batts or blankets, or blow insulation, right out to the very edge of the attic floor. Note: Blown insulation may require an additional block to prevent insulation from being blown into the soffit. A piece of rigid foam board placed on the outer edge of the top plate works very well for this.

Place rafter vents in between the rafters where the ceiling meets the floor.
Photo courtesy of Doug Anderson

Add insulation around the rafter vent and out to the edge of the attic floor.
Photo courtesy of Doug Anderson


Electric Cars 2015 List – Prices, Efficiency, Range, Pics. #car #tax


#electric cars
#

Electric Cars 2015 — Prices, Efficiency, Range, Pics, More

February 16th, 2014 by Zach

Update [May 31, 2015]: Several prices have been updated to reflect changes made by the manufacturers.

Update [December 31, 2014]: Since this article still gets a lot of traffic, rather than create an entirely new article for 2015, I m simply changing this 2014 list to a 2015 list. Also, as I have done in the past year, I will update the info here when new cars or data arrive. In case it is helpful to anyone, I will also start putting updates on the bottom of this page to note when and where I made changes. Thanks to everyone who has helped to make this page as useful as it is, and thanks to everyone who does so in the future!

Wondering what electric cars are on the market or soon will be? Wonder no more. I m going to run down all of them in the article below. I will also add a few key details and commentary for each one (including prices, efficiency, range, and # of seats when such information is available).

Furthermore, I m doing something I don t think I ve seen anywhere else I m listing all of the electric cars that are available in the US and  all of the electric cars that are available in Europe. In the case of electric cars only available in Europe, I ve tried to find the prices in euros in key markets, in British pounds, and sometimes in other popular markets (like Norway).

The cars are listed from most affordable to most expensive before  the US federal tax credit for EVs. Note that 100% electrics come with higher tax credits, so can end up being cheaper than plug-in hybrids. Also, tax credits are greater for plug-in hybrids with bigger batteries, so even within that category cars can swap places after calculating the tax credit. (Also don t forget that many other countries, US states, and even some cities and regions offer EV incentives of their own, some of which apply to all of the cars below, and some of which only apply to 100% electrics.)


Cheap Fuel Efficiency: Ten 40 MPG Cars For Under $20, 000 #car #parts #online


#cheap new cars
#

Cheap Fuel Efficiency: Ten 40 MPG Cars For Under $20,000

For many people, the purchase of a fuel efficient car is usually made to save money on driving, as the cost of being a car owner rises further and further.

That being the case, why buy an expensive car in the first place, potentially taking years longer to pay off the fuel savings? The good news is that there are plenty of cars available for less than $20,000 that will still get you 40 MPG on the highway.

Honda’s Civic has always been known for its fuel efficiency and the 2012 model is no different. 40mpg on the highway has been achieved through fuel saving features such as aerodynamic body moldings and streamlined wheel trims. It’s cheaper than the Civic Hybrid, too.

We’re well aware of the Cruze Eco’s credentials since Australian couple the Taylors managed to get 64 mpg driving through 48 U.S. States. Regular drivers should still see 42mpg on the highway.

It’s a pity that Ford charges $495 extra for its SFE package on the Focus (on SE trim only), helping it hit 40mpg from the standard car’s 38mpg highway. We’d like to see the fuel saving bits and pieces as standard.

Another Honda, and the only hybrid in our ten cheapest 40mpg cars, for which Honda must be commended. 43mpg on the highway is the best here too. If you can’t stretch the extra few thousand towards a Prius, then the Insight is probably your best option.

Getting great gas milage needn’t only be the preserve of compact family cars – the Veloster has a hint of coupe style to go with the efficiency.

The Veloster may top this list on style but the Elantra 1.8 is cheaper to buy and offers more space, perfect for families wanting to save some money. Let’s face it – it’s still a looker too.

Like the Focus, the Fiesta SFE package costs an extra $495 and is only available on SE trim and above. If it was available on the base trim level, it’d be an even cheaper way to reach 40mpg highway.

It’s an achievement to have two 40mpg cars in the top ten – to get three on the list is very impressive. The Accent 1.6 is the cheapest way to get your hands on a fuel-efficient Hyundai.

The new 2012 Kia Rio isn’t just one of America’s cheapest cars – it’s also a true 40mpg contender with the new 138 horsepower 1.6. It even looks great, which couldn’t be said about the cheaper, less efficient old model. Price is rumored to be around $13k, but it’s more likely to match the 2012 Hyundai Accent on price.

If you want to stand out for as little money as possible, even the Veloster can’t top the tiny Smart Fortwo Coupe. It may not be as efficient as you’d expect (and nowhere near the European diesel version ), but for this price you can’t sniff at 41 mpg on the highway. With the Rio going upmarket for 2012, the Smart will be the cheapest 40mpg car on sale.

&&&++

Follow GreenCarReports on   Facebook   and   Twitter .


Cheap Fuel Efficiency: Ten 40 MPG Cars For Under $20, 000 #diamond #car #insurance


#cheap new cars
#

Cheap Fuel Efficiency: Ten 40 MPG Cars For Under $20,000

For many people, the purchase of a fuel efficient car is usually made to save money on driving, as the cost of being a car owner rises further and further.

That being the case, why buy an expensive car in the first place, potentially taking years longer to pay off the fuel savings? The good news is that there are plenty of cars available for less than $20,000 that will still get you 40 MPG on the highway.

Honda’s Civic has always been known for its fuel efficiency and the 2012 model is no different. 40mpg on the highway has been achieved through fuel saving features such as aerodynamic body moldings and streamlined wheel trims. It’s cheaper than the Civic Hybrid, too.

We’re well aware of the Cruze Eco’s credentials since Australian couple the Taylors managed to get 64 mpg driving through 48 U.S. States. Regular drivers should still see 42mpg on the highway.

It’s a pity that Ford charges $495 extra for its SFE package on the Focus (on SE trim only), helping it hit 40mpg from the standard car’s 38mpg highway. We’d like to see the fuel saving bits and pieces as standard.

Another Honda, and the only hybrid in our ten cheapest 40mpg cars, for which Honda must be commended. 43mpg on the highway is the best here too. If you can’t stretch the extra few thousand towards a Prius, then the Insight is probably your best option.

Getting great gas milage needn’t only be the preserve of compact family cars – the Veloster has a hint of coupe style to go with the efficiency.

The Veloster may top this list on style but the Elantra 1.8 is cheaper to buy and offers more space, perfect for families wanting to save some money. Let’s face it – it’s still a looker too.

Like the Focus, the Fiesta SFE package costs an extra $495 and is only available on SE trim and above. If it was available on the base trim level, it’d be an even cheaper way to reach 40mpg highway.

It’s an achievement to have two 40mpg cars in the top ten – to get three on the list is very impressive. The Accent 1.6 is the cheapest way to get your hands on a fuel-efficient Hyundai.

The new 2012 Kia Rio isn’t just one of America’s cheapest cars – it’s also a true 40mpg contender with the new 138 horsepower 1.6. It even looks great, which couldn’t be said about the cheaper, less efficient old model. Price is rumored to be around $13k, but it’s more likely to match the 2012 Hyundai Accent on price.

If you want to stand out for as little money as possible, even the Veloster can’t top the tiny Smart Fortwo Coupe. It may not be as efficient as you’d expect (and nowhere near the European diesel version ), but for this price you can’t sniff at 41 mpg on the highway. With the Rio going upmarket for 2012, the Smart will be the cheapest 40mpg car on sale.

&&&++

Follow GreenCarReports on   Facebook   and   Twitter .


Electric Cars 2015 List – Prices, Efficiency, Range, Pics. #second #hand #car #dealers


#electric cars
#

Electric Cars 2015 — Prices, Efficiency, Range, Pics, More

February 16th, 2014 by Zach

Update [May 31, 2015]: Several prices have been updated to reflect changes made by the manufacturers.

Update [December 31, 2014]: Since this article still gets a lot of traffic, rather than create an entirely new article for 2015, I m simply changing this 2014 list to a 2015 list. Also, as I have done in the past year, I will update the info here when new cars or data arrive. In case it is helpful to anyone, I will also start putting updates on the bottom of this page to note when and where I made changes. Thanks to everyone who has helped to make this page as useful as it is, and thanks to everyone who does so in the future!

Wondering what electric cars are on the market or soon will be? Wonder no more. I m going to run down all of them in the article below. I will also add a few key details and commentary for each one (including prices, efficiency, range, and # of seats when such information is available).

Furthermore, I m doing something I don t think I ve seen anywhere else I m listing all of the electric cars that are available in the US and  all of the electric cars that are available in Europe. In the case of electric cars only available in Europe, I ve tried to find the prices in euros in key markets, in British pounds, and sometimes in other popular markets (like Norway).

The cars are listed from most affordable to most expensive before  the US federal tax credit for EVs. Note that 100% electrics come with higher tax credits, so can end up being cheaper than plug-in hybrids. Also, tax credits are greater for plug-in hybrids with bigger batteries, so even within that category cars can swap places after calculating the tax credit. (Also don t forget that many other countries, US states, and even some cities and regions offer EV incentives of their own, some of which apply to all of the cars below, and some of which only apply to 100% electrics.)