Early Ford V-8 Club #car #comparison


#v cars
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Welcome to the Early Ford V-8 Club of America

An International Organization

Founded in San Leandro, California in 1963, our club recognizes all Ford Motor Company vehicles made between 1932 and 1953, including Ford, Lincoln, Mercury, commercial vehicles, tractors and other Ford powered vehicles built around the world utilizing the 4, 6, 8, and 12 cylinder engines produced by Ford Motor Company.

Today, as the Marquee Club of our represented vehicles, with membership of over 9,000 and 125 Regional Groups worldwide, we are dedicated to the restoration and preservation of all Ford Motor Company vehicles built between 1932 and 1953.

The club’s award-winning, bi-monthly magazine, the V-8 Times, is circulated all over the world and is acclaimed as one of the best car club magazines anywhere. The V-8 Times features technical articles, shop tips, questions and answers by our panel of experts, nostalgia, club and regional group news, offerings of accessories and restoration manuals found nowhere else – plus classified ads for cars and parts.

If you’re not already a member, we invite you to Join Today and explore the works of the Early Ford V-8 Club of America.


Early Ford V-8 Club


#v cars
#

Welcome to the Early Ford V-8 Club of America

An International Organization

Founded in San Leandro, California in 1963, our club recognizes all Ford Motor Company vehicles made between 1932 and 1953, including Ford, Lincoln, Mercury, commercial vehicles, tractors and other Ford powered vehicles built around the world utilizing the 4, 6, 8, and 12 cylinder engines produced by Ford Motor Company.

Today, as the Marquee Club of our represented vehicles, with membership of over 9,000 and 125 Regional Groups worldwide, we are dedicated to the restoration and preservation of all Ford Motor Company vehicles built between 1932 and 1953.

The club’s award-winning, bi-monthly magazine, the V-8 Times, is circulated all over the world and is acclaimed as one of the best car club magazines anywhere. The V-8 Times features technical articles, shop tips, questions and answers by our panel of experts, nostalgia, club and regional group news, offerings of accessories and restoration manuals found nowhere else – plus classified ads for cars and parts.

If you’re not already a member, we invite you to Join Today and explore the works of the Early Ford V-8 Club of America.


Accredited Early Childhood Programs #associate #degree #early #childhood #education


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Capital Community College
A.S. Early Childhood Education

Housatonic Community College
A.S. Early Childhood Inclusive Education (formerly available as A.S. Early Childhood Education or A.S. Early Childhood Education with Special Education Option)

Manchester Community College
A.S. Early Childhood Education

Middlesex Community College
A.S. Early Childhood Education

Northwestern Connecticut Community College
A.S. Early Childhood Education

Norwalk Community College
A.S. Early Childhood Education–Career Program
A.S. Early Childhood Education–Transfer Program

Quinebaug Valley Community College
A.S. Early Childhood Education

Three Rivers Community College
A.S. Early Childhood Education

 F

FLORIDA

Miami Dade College
A.S. Early Childhood Education (General, Infant/Toddler, Preschool, and Education Administrator tracks)

GEORGIA

Chattahoochee Technical College
A.A.S. Early Childhood Care Education

Gwinnett Technical College
A.A.S. Early Childhood Care and Education

H

HAWAII

INDIANA

Ivy Tech Community College-Central Indiana (Indianapolis)
A.S. Early Childhood Education
A.S. Early Childhood Education
(transfer track to Ball State University)
A.S. Early Childhood Education
(transfer track to Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis)

Ivy Tech Community College-Gary
A.A.S. Early Childhood Education
A.S. Early Childhood Education

Ivy Tech Community College-Kokomo
A.A.S. Early Childhood Education
A.S. Early Childhood Education
(transfer track to Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis)
A.S. Early Childhood Education
(transfer track to Indiana University-Purdue University Fort Wayne)

Ivy Tech Community College-Northeast/Fort Wayne
A.S. Early Childhood Education
(articulating to Indiana University-Purdue University Fort Wayne Elementary Education)
A.A.S. Early Childhood Education

Ivy Tech Community College-Southern/Sellersburg
A.S. Early Childhood Education
A.A.S. Early Childhood Education

IOWA

Johnston Community College
A.A.S. Early Childhood Education

Martin Community College
A.A.S. Early Childhood

McDowell Technical Community College
A.A.S. Early Childhood Education

Nash Community College
A.A.S. Early Childhood Education

Richmond Community College
A.A.S. Early Childhood Education

Robeson Community College
A.A.S. Early Childhood: Administration Track
A.A.S. Early Childhood: Articulation Track

Rowan-Cabarrus Community College
A.A.S. Early Childhood Education

Sampson Community College
A.A.S. Early Childhood Education

South Piedmont Community College
A.A.S. Early Childhood Education

Stanly Community College
A.A.S. Early Childhood Education

Wake Technical Community College
A.A.S. Early Childhood Education

Wayne Community College
A.A.S. Early Childhood Education

O

OHIO

Central Ohio Technical College
A.A.S. Early Childhood Education Technology (formerly known as A.A.S. ECD Technology, Teaching Option and A.A.S. ECD Technology, Early Childhood Development)

Cuyahoga Community College
A.A.S. Early Childhood Education

Lakeland Community College

A.A.S. Early Childhood Education

Owens Community College
A.A.S. Early Childhood Education Technology

OKLAHOMA

Oklahoma City Community College
A.A. University Parallel Child Development
A.A.S. Technical and Occupational Child Development

Oklahoma State University-Oklahoma City
A.A.S. Early Care Education

Tulsa Community College
A.S. Child Development Child and Family, OSU Transfer Option
A.S. Child Development Human and Family Services/Early Care, NSU Transfer Option
A.A.S. Child Development Center Director Option
A.A.S. Child Development Early Childhood Option
A.A.S. Child Development Infant/Toddler Option

Western Oklahoma State College(full degree available online)
A.S. Early Childhood
A.A.S. Child Development

OREGON

Portland Community College
A.A.S. Early Education and Family Studies

Southwestern Oregon Community College(full degree available online)
A.S. Childhood Education and Family Studies
A.A.S. Childhood Education and Family Studies

P

PENNSYLVANIA

Delaware County Community College
A.A. Early Childhood Education

Harcum College
A.A. Early Childhood Education

Harrisburg Area Community College
A.A. Early Childhood–Elementary Education–Early Care and Education Track
A.A. Early Childhood–Elementary Education–Pre-Teaching Track

Lehigh Carbon Community College
A.A.S. Early Childhood Education
A.A.S. Early Childhood Education Early Intervention

Montgomery County Community College
A.A. Education in the Early Years: Birth Through Fourth Grade

Northampton Community College(full degree available online)
A.A.S. Early Childhood Education: Infant to Grade 4

Pennsylvania College of Technology
A.A.S. Early Childhood Education

RHODE ISLAND

Community College of Rhode Island

A.A. Early Childhood Education and Child Development

S

SOUTH CAROLINA

Aiken Technical College
A.A.S. Early Care and Education

Central Carolina Technical College
A.A.S. Early Care and Education

Denmark Technical College
A.A.S. Early Care and Education

Greenville Technical College
A.A.S. Early Care and Education

Horry-Georgetown Technical College
A.A.S Early Care and Education

Midlands Technical College
A.A.S. Early Care and Education

Orangeburg-Calhoun Technical College
A.A.S. Early Care and Education

Piedmont Technical College
A.A.S. Early Care and Education

Spartanburg Community College
A.A.S Early Childhood Development–Early Care and Education (formerly known as A.A.S. Advanced Child Care Management and A.A.S. Infant/Toddler)

Technical College of the Lowcountry
A.A.S. Early Care and Education

TriCounty Technical College
A.A.S. Early Childhood Development

Trident Technical College
A.A.S. Early Care and Education Child Care Professional Career Path
A.A.S. Early Care and Education Child Care Management Career Path
A.A.S. Early Care and Education Special Education Career Path

Williamsburg Technical College
A.A.S. Early Care and Education

York Technical College
A.A.S. Early Care and Education

T

TENNESSEE

Chattanooga State Community College
A.A.S. Early Childhood Education

Dyersburg State Community College
A.A.S. Early Childhood Education

Motlow State Community College
A.A.S. Early Childhood Education

Nashville State Community College
A.A.S. Early Childhood Education

Northeast State Community College
A.A.S. Early Childhood Education

Pellissippi State Community College
A.A.S. Early Childhood Education

Walters State Community College
A.A.S. Early Childhood Education

TEXAS

Collin College
A.A.S. Child Development

Eastfield College(full degree available online)
A.A.S. Child Development Early Childhood Education

Houston Community College
A.A.S. Child Development

San Antonio College
A.A.S. Early Childhood Studies

San Jacinto College – Central Campus
A.A.S. Child Development/Early Childhood Education

St. Philip s College(full degree available online)
A.A.S. Early Childhood Studies
A.A.S. Early Childhood Studies – Language and Literacy Specialization

Wharton County Junior College
A.A.S. Early Childhood/Child Development

W

WISCONSIN

Milwaukee Area Technical College
A.A.S. Early Childhood Education


Early Intervention Specialist Training and Degree Program Information #masters #in #early #intervention, #early #intervention #specialist #training #and #degree #program #information


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Early Intervention Specialist Training and Degree Program Information

said it was important to communicate with colleges during the search process. (Source: Noel-Levitz 2012 trend study)

Select a school or program

  • EdD in Organizational Leadership – Special Education
  • Ed.D. in Organizational Leadership – Behavioral Health
  • M.Ed. in Special Education: Cross-Categorical
  • M.Ed. in Master of Education in Early Childhood Education and Early Childhood Special Education-ITL
  • M.Ed. in Master of Education in Early Childhood Education and Early Childhood Special Education-NITL
  • M.A. in Autism Spectrum Disorders
  • MA in Curriculum and Instruction
  • MA in Gifted Education
  • BS in Elementary Education / Special Education (Dual Major)
  • Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education
  • BS in Early Childhood
  • B.S. in Early Childhood Education and Early Childhood Special Education
  • B.S. in Elementary Education with an Emphasis in Christian Education
  • View all programs
    • MA in Education and Human Development in Secondary Special Education and Transition Services
    • MA in Education and Human Development in Special Education for Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Learners
    • MA in Education and Human Development in Organizational Leadership and Learning
    • Graduate Certificate in Special Education for Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Learners
    • Graduate Certificate in Transition Special Education
    • View all programs
  • View More Schools

    Show Me Schools

    Home visits, family consultations, and field experiences

    Early intervention specialist programs require a bachelor’s degree for admission. Many certificate programs require a teacher’s license. Certificate programs usually consist of fewer than 10 courses, and some prerequisite courses in the fundamentals of special education are required. The courses cover assessment of children with disabilities, program planning, and current issues in special education. An internship in a classroom is mandatory. In addition to a bachelor’s degree, some graduate certificate programs require proof that an applicant is certified in preschool or primary education. They may also require students to complete prerequisite coursework in child development, special education, and legal issues prior to admission. Furthermore, students should demonstrate competency in concepts closely related to their chosen specialization, such as sign language for those specializing in teaching children with hearing impairments.

    The length of a master’s program varies, depending on if the student is pursuing initial certification. In addition to classroom work, the program includes home visits, family consultations, and field experiences working with children of differing ages. Courses teach students about assessments and goals as well as instructional strategies. Some master’s programs may offer general teacher education in addition to training in early intervention. Some programs are available online.

    Licensure Certificate Programs

    Early intervention specialist licensure certificate programs prepare students to provide intervention services to disabled children from birth to age five. These post-baccalaureate programs also qualify students for state certification in early childhood intervention. Programs cover topics like child care, family support, and nutrition. Students additionally learn about the early identification of disabilities and abnormalities, advocacy, and family-focused intervention. Graduates apply their skills to the intensive care and education of children experiencing a range of disabilities.

    Students gain skills required to design, implement, and monitor early intervention services and advocate on behalf of children with disabilities. Coursework provides an understanding of team approaches to working with disabled children and the importance of working with multiple agencies to reach intervention goals. Programs include courses in:

    • Infant and child development and growth
    • Nutrition
    • Educational practices and programming
    • Curriculum activities
    • Screening and assessment
    • Instructional planning for young children

    Find schools that offer these popular programs

    • Teaching Gifted and Talented Students
    • Teaching Special Education – Autism
    • Teaching Special Education – Developmentally Delayed
    • Teaching Special Education – Emotional Disturbances
    • Teaching Special Education – Hearing Impairments
    • Teaching Special Education – Learning Disabilities
    • Teaching Special Education – Mental Retardation
    • Teaching Special Education – Multiple Disabilities
    • Teaching Special Education – Orthopedic Impairments
    • Teaching Special Education – Speech Impairments
    • Teaching Special Education – Traumatic Brain Injuries
    • Teaching Special Education – Vision Impairments
    • Teaching Special Education, Children and Young Children

    Master’s Degree Programs

    Master’s degree programs in early childhood intervention prepare students to work with young children with or at risk of developing special needs. Students learn concepts related to instructional methods, behavioral management, the needs of special education learners, and the technologies used in special education environments. Programs qualify students for state special education teacher licensing for young children. Some programs also offer separate options for students already possessing their initial teaching licensure, and for students wishing to acquire standard licensure.

    Students focus their learning in a specific area of early intervention, such as teaching the hearing impaired. As a result, course topics will reflect each student’s selected career track. Programs may include courses such as:

    • Language, hearing development, and sign language
    • Teaching literacy to deaf children
    • Applying technology in special education
    • Phonics and language structure
    • Special needs learning assessment
    • Interventions for special needs learners

    Popular Career Options

    Graduates of master’s degree programs have several career options in special education and intervention programs. Graduates find work in rehabilitative programs, hospitals, not-for-profit organizations, and schools. Some popular career options include the following:

    • Developmental specialist
    • Teacher
    • Early interventionist

    Licensing Information

    Graduates seeking teaching opportunities in public schools must gain state licensure prior to gaining employment. Licensure requirements are determined by each state and generally require that an individual has a minimum of a bachelor’s degree, has graduated from an approved teaching program, and has supervised teaching experience. Some states additionally offer a general special education license or licenses for specific areas.

    Employment Outlook and Salary

    The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that special education teachers could expect average job growth of 6% from 2014 – 2024. Special education preschool teachers reported median annual earnings of $53,990 as of 2015.

    Early intervention specialist programs require a bachelor’s degree for admission and provide training in a number of areas relevant to working with special needs children.

    Next: View Schools

    • EdD in Organizational Leadership – Special Education
    • Ed.D. in Organizational Leadership – Behavioral Health
    • M.Ed. in Special Education: Cross-Categorical
    • M.Ed. in Master of Education in Early Childhood Education and Early Childhood Special Education-ITL
    • M.Ed. in Master of Education in Early Childhood Education and Early Childhood Special Education-NITL
    • M.A. in Autism Spectrum Disorders
    • MA in Curriculum and Instruction
    • MA in Gifted Education
    • BS in Elementary Education / Special Education (Dual Major)
    • Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education
    • BS in Early Childhood
    • B.S. in Early Childhood Education and Early Childhood Special Education
    • B.S. in Elementary Education with an Emphasis in Christian Education
    • View more
    • MA in Education and Human Development in Secondary Special Education and Transition Services
    • MA in Education and Human Development in Special Education for Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Learners
    • MA in Education and Human Development in Organizational Leadership and Learning
    • Graduate Certificate in Special Education for Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Learners
    • Graduate Certificate in Transition Special Education
    • View more
    • Master of Science in Education in Special Education

  • Doctoral Programs #concordia #university #chicago #s #college #of #graduate #and #innovative #programs #has #highly #ranked, #on-campus, #cohort #and #online #programs. #we #offer #masters, #post-masters, #endorsements, #certifications #and #doctoral #programs #in #education, #business, #humanities #and #leadership. # #/ # #meta #id= #metakeywords # #name= #keywords # #content= #concordia #university, #chicago, #illinois, #graduate #degree #programs, #master #s #degree, #master #s #programs, #ma #programs, #doctoral #degrees, #doctoral #programs, #edd, #mba, #mbas, #master #of #business #administration, #master #s #of #business #administration, #education, #early #childhood #education, #teaching, #reading, #christian #education, #curriculum #and #instruction, #c #amp;i, #esl, #esl #endorsement, #educational #technology, #school #counseling, #school #leadership, #accelerated #degree #completion, #adult #education


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    Doctoral Programs

    Welcome to Concordia University Chicago and thank you for your interest in applying to one of our doctoral programs. All documents relating to admission should be submitted to Concordia University’s Office of Graduate Admission and Student Services prior to the deadline for your anticipated term of enrollment. See your degree of interest on this Web site for application and file completion deadlines.

    Admission Requirements

    Admission to the doctoral program occurs prior to initiation of course work. The number of students admitted will be limited to ensure quality of program and dissertation advising.

    Applicants who are successful in their application for admission for entrance into the doctoral program will meet the following criteria:

    • Master’s degree with a minimum 3.0 GPA
    • A completed Doctoral Application for Admission
    • Submission of rationale statement, including personal goals for applying for admission to the program.
    • Transcripts: Submission of official transcripts of all previous credits.
    • Testing: Current Graduate Record Exam or Miller Analogies Test scores (test taken within the prior three years).
    • Letters of recommendation from two persons qualified to comment upon the applicant’s potential for doctoral study.
    • Past experience: At least two years of successful teaching/administrative experience (required only for doctoral programs in K-12 education).
    • Writing sample: Submit a paper that demonstrates your ability to write in a scholarly manner at a level typical of graduate work. A paper from your master’s program would be most appropriate. This sample should approach, but not exceed, five pages in length.

    All documents should be submitted to:

    Office of Graduate Admission and Student Services
    Concordia University Chicago
    7400 Augusta Street
    River Forest, IL 60305

    The office fax number is (708) 209-3454.

    Once the admission file is completed and initially reviewed, qualified applicants will complete an extemporaneous writing sample followed by a personal interview with an admission committee.

    Admission recommendations are submitted from the admission committee to the Dean of the College of Education, who will then make the final admission decision and communicate the decision to the candidate. The admission committee may establish an admission waiting list, if necessary. Students admitted should consult the Doctoral Program Handbook for additional program information.

    Students who are applying for admission to the doctoral program are precluded from enrolling in any courses which met doctoral program requirements until the student has been completely admitted to the program.

    The Graduate Admission Committee reserves the right to request additional information or documentation deemed helpful in evaluating applicants for admission.

    Additional Testing

    Depending on program of study, students may be required to take additional tests such as the Graduate Record Exam, Miller Analogies Test and/or the Illinois Basic Skills Test. A writing sample, essay, FBI fingerprint criminal background check, valid teaching certificate and/or interview may also be required to determine what may be necessary for a student to qualify for a graduate program.

    Pending Status

    Doctoral and international students are not eligible for Pending Status .

    International Students

    Applicants who are not U.S. citizens are required to meet all admission standards listed for the program they wish to enter. In addition, the following are required to be considered for admission:

    • TOEFL: A score of at least 550 (paper-based) or 72 (internet) minimum requirement on the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL), or successful completion of Level 112 at an English Language School (ELS) unless English is the native language, and an unqualified recommendation from an ELS program director is provided. (International students who have earned an advanced degree from an accredited institution in the United States do not need to submit TOEFL scores.)
    • Transcripts: Official transcripts from each college/university attended showing all college/university course work with certified English translations of all transcripts originally prepared in any other language. Also, any international transcripts must be evaluated by a Concordia-approved international credentialing service such as WES (World Education Services), ECE (Educational Credential Evaluators), or AACRAO (American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admission Officers).
    • Financial Support: A certified document guaranteeing adequate financial support for at least the student’s first year of study and, barring any unforeseen circumstances, adequate funding from the same or an equally dependable source, for subsequent years.
    • Medical: A physical exam, adequate medical insurance, and proof of immunization are required prior to enrollment.
    • Regular Admission Requirements: International students must qualify for regular admission to a degree program in order to enroll.

    All documents must be received by the Office of Graduate Admission and Enrollment Services at least three months prior to the expected date of entry. I-20 forms may be issued only after University acceptance is granted and will remain in effect only for students who continue to make satisfactory progress as full-time students in an accepted university program. The program length may vary for each student.

    Application information


    Master s Degree in Early Childhood Education Online (MEd) #masters #in #early #childhood #education,early #childhood #education #masters #degree,master #of #ed #in #early #childhood #education,early #childhood #education #masters #of #education,online #masters #of #education,masters #in #education #online


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    MEd in Curriculum Instruction: Early Childhood Education

    This Early Childhood Education (ECE) concentration is designed for those who have a strong passion for teaching young children and who believe that children learn best through active, hands-on learning. Candidates will explore current trends and research, design developmentally effective curriculum, and develop skills in advocating for young children.

    The Next Start Date is July 17th

    MEd in Curriculum Instruction: Early Childhood Education Program Goals

    In addition to meeting the objectives for all Concordia Portland’s MEd programs, successful candidates in the MEd in Curriculum Instruction: Early Childhood Education concentration will demonstrate:

    • Expertise in the utilization of new methods of authentic assessment and strategies as tools to evaluate student learning progress in relation to Oregon’s Common Core State Standards and specific district standards.
    • Effective instructional skills in planning, implementing, and assessing instruction in settings that include diverse cultural populations and special needs students.
    • An understanding of the ways that the specific curricular/instructional area has the potential to be responsive to classroom diversity.
    • A clear understanding of the moral leadership required of them as advanced scholars in the chosen area of curriculum and instruction.
    • The ability to modify instructional plans and promote alternative goals and strategies when necessary, particularly in relation to assessment results.

    Course Descriptions

    Students enrolled in the Early Childhood Education program must complete:

    • Four core courses required for the Curriculum Instruction degree
    • Foundation courses for the specific concentration

    MEd in Curriculum & Instruction – Core Courses

    Developing Character Through the Curriculum

    This course will provide teachers with the resources and skills necessary to integrate character themes and character development into their school curriculum. It provides a forum in which to discuss and develop one’s own moral perspectives on the basis of generally accepted criteria.

    Theories of Teaching and Learning

    This course is designed to provide leaders with the latest psychological research about learning and guide them in exploring ways to directly apply these precepts to their current work setting. Topics will include cognitive science, learning theory, and relevant teaching theories that utilize this information. The course will fuse the latest biological and psychological understanding of how the brain learns so candidates can harness this knowledge and apply it directly to learning situations.

    Community of Learners

    Relationships constructed on trust are critical for an efficient, collegial, collaborative workplace. This course challenges candidates to confront the tremendous diversity in their current environment and develop strategies to build community in the midst of the social, ethnic, economic and alternative lifestyle differences that permeate today’s 21st century workplace. In sum, this course stresses the critical importance of creating community in the workplace and illustrates how that community, once established, can generate an efficient, supportive, and positive work place.

    Contemporary Educational Thought

    Candidates identify, review, and analyze major trends and issues impacting the contemporary state and national educational scenes. Each class session provides students with an opportunity to evaluate the advantages and liabilities of current educational reforms and issues from the perspective of prevailing educational research as well as from their own personal beliefs and current work environment. Candidates will also consider how they can impact and influence change in their own workplace.

    MEd in Curriculum & Instruction – Early Childhood Education

    Issues and Advocacy in ECE

    This course provides an overview of the field of early childhood education by exploring its past, present and future. Significant issues focusing on advocacy for children and families will be addressed in terms of the interpretation of research, philosophical approaches, and application of theory. Students will become familiar with advocacy for children and families at the local, state, and national levels.

    ECE: A Constructivist Approach

    This course focuses on curriculum development in pre-kindergarten and the primary grades from a constructivist perspective. Emphasis is placed on facilitating child-centered learning and implementing authentic assessment practices within State prescribed standards and benchmarks. This course is specifically designed for classroom teachers willing to explore the opportunities of project-based learning.

    Play in Early Childhood Education

    This course focuses on the relationship between play and learning for young children (birth through age eight). It is based on the philosophy that children construct knowledge while actively engaged in the process of understanding the world around them. Strategies for implementing play opportunities in the preschool and primary curriculum will be accentuated in order that the student may create a classroom environment that supports playful learning.

    This course examines the development of literacy skills in young children, ages 0-8. Topics include the reading/writing connection, use of trade books and thematic literature, and current research in the field of literacy development.

    This course provides students with the basic competencies necessary to understand and evaluate the research of others, and to plan their own research with a minimum of assistance. This course includes the basics of both qualitative and quantitative research.

    The Master of Education culminates with one of three additional research courses:

    The Master of Education culminates with one of three additional research courses

    Practitioner Inquiry focuses on the reflective acts of the candidate as an educator seeking to improve teaching practice. Premised in the self-study research methodological traditions (Samaras, 2011), Practitioner Inquiry provides the opportunity to reflect on teaching practice and generate improvements based on classroom observation. Practitioner Inquiry focuses on the educator and her/his own practices, developing skills of inquiry, observation, reflection, and action in teachers. Prerequisite: Successful completion of EDGR 601 Educational Research

    Action research is one of the capstone projects for the Master of Education program. During this five-week course, candidates will learn more about the action research methodology, complete final edits of the Literature Review, and design a complete Action Research proposal including data collection methods and analysis approaches. (During this course, the proposal will NOT be implemented with students/participants.)
    This design provides students with the requisite skills and means to pursue the transformative practice called “Action Research” in their classroom, school, district or other work environment. The design method for the capstone project closely aligns with current classroom realities, with district and school requirements, and the needs of teachers and students.

    The Thesis offers the graduate student the opportunity to investigate, in depth, a topic in the field of education. The student, working with his or her thesis instructor, will explore relevant literature and present a thesis following the procedure established by the College of Education.

    Any of the above options provide candidates with an understanding of the role of research in the field of education as a tool to solve problems and as a way to improve student learning.

    Earning Your Curriculum Instruction: Early Childhood Education Master’s Degree Online

    The Master of Education in Curriculum and Instruction: Early Childhood Education program is fully online. The online format uses cutting-edge curriculum and easy-to-use online learning tools to provide students with a convenient yet challenging educational experience. Online classes are 5 weeks in length and can be accessed via Internet


    Early Ford V-8 Club #hybrid #car


    #v cars
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    Welcome to the Early Ford V-8 Club of America

    An International Organization

    Founded in San Leandro, California in 1963, our club recognizes all Ford Motor Company vehicles made between 1932 and 1953, including Ford, Lincoln, Mercury, commercial vehicles, tractors and other Ford powered vehicles built around the world utilizing the 4, 6, 8, and 12 cylinder engines produced by Ford Motor Company.

    Today, as the Marquee Club of our represented vehicles, with membership of over 9,000 and 125 Regional Groups worldwide, we are dedicated to the restoration and preservation of all Ford Motor Company vehicles built between 1932 and 1953.

    The club’s award-winning, bi-monthly magazine, the V-8 Times, is circulated all over the world and is acclaimed as one of the best car club magazines anywhere. The V-8 Times features technical articles, shop tips, questions and answers by our panel of experts, nostalgia, club and regional group news, offerings of accessories and restoration manuals found nowhere else – plus classified ads for cars and parts.

    If you’re not already a member, we invite you to Join Today and explore the works of the Early Ford V-8 Club of America.


    Early Childhood Programs – The Guidance Center #early #childhood #colleges


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    Early Childhood Education

    Our Early Childhood Education programs help nurture the social and emotional development of very young (to age 5) children. We offer:

    • pre-kindergarten class (Mamaroneck, New Rochelle)
    • therapeutic nursery, full and half day (New Rochelle)
    • toddler class for children 18-36 months (OPENING January 2017, New Rochelle)
    • SEIT services for children ages 3-5 years old

    The Creative Learning Center. located in New Rochelle, meets the individual needs of typically developing children as well as those with special needs. Together, they learn, play and thrive! The Creative Learning Center has a full-day preschool class as well as special needs classes and Universal Pre-K. They also offer working-parent friendly hours of 7:30 am to 6:00 pm. We will offer a new toddler class (18-36 months) starting in January 2017! Contact us about enrollment .

    Mamaroneck UPK, located at Central School in the Mamaroneck school district, offers half-day Universal Pre-Kindergarten classes (morning or afternoon) 5 days per week. Our program is a school readiness model for all children who will be eligible for Kindergarten the following year (4 year olds). Children gain skills through our facilitated play and supported social/emotional curriculums, and build a love of learning through interactions with each other, their teachers and their environment.

    To be eligible for the Mamaroneck UPK program for the 2017-2018 school year children must reside in the Mamaroneck Union Free School district, and must turn 4 in the 2017 calendar year. We are currently accepting applications! Follow this link to the school district’s website for registration forms and information. This intake form must also be completed. To learn more, please contact us .

    Foundations in Feelings is an innovative approach for addressing the social-emotional development needs of very young children. Designed to support the social-emotional development of children while working with childcare providers and parents, Foundations in Feelingswas once only available to select daycare centers but is now available to all.

    FREE Programs for Families of Children with autism and developmental delays now take place at our Creative Learning Center two Sundays a month. We have a montly parent-only support group as well as free counseling services for individuals or couples. Funded in part by the Office of People with Developmental Delays.

    For more information on our Early Childhood programs, email us or call 914-613-0700 x7012 .

    Our Programs


    Courses – Derby Adult Learning Service #basic #skills, #esol, #return #to #work #and #learning, #learning #difficulties, #maths #gcse, #business, #book-keeping, #teacher #training, #computers, #clait, #ecdl, #word #processing, #it #courses, #hospitality, #sports #and #leisure, #aromatherapy, #mendhi, #sugarcraft, #aerobics, #fitness, #keep #fit, #badminton, #wine #appreciation, #yoga, #pilates, #tv #repairs, #health, #social #care #and #public #service, #counselling, #deaf #awareness, #early #years #education, #pre-retirement, #visual, #performing #arts, #art, #dancing, #woodwork, #pottery, #singing, #song #writing, #embroidery, #craft #and #jewellery, #guitar, #painting, #rug #making, #sewing, #languages, #communication, #english #as #a #foreign #language, #english #gcse, #creative #writing, #french, #german, #italian, #spanish, #greek, #sign #language


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    Derby Adult Learning Service provides hundreds of courses in Derby for you to choose from in a whole range of subjects. Select one of the learning areas below for a list of related courses available:

    Computing
    Computing for beginners, Internet and Email, European Computer Driving License (ECDL), Digital Photography, Various entry level courses

    Cookery and Baking
    Introduction to Cookery, Italian, Indian Cookery, All about Chocolate, Wine Appreciation

    Education Training
    Supporting Teaching and Learning in Schools
    City and Guilds – Train the Trainer Level 3 Award in Education and Training and Level 4 Certificate in Education and Training

    English and Maths
    Brush up on your English, Improve your maths skills, English GCSE, Maths GCSE

    Hospitality, Sports and Leisure
    Wine Appreciation including WSET (Wines, Spirits, Educational Trust) Level 2 and 3 Qualifications, Italian Cookery, Indian Cookery, Yoga, Tai Chi for Health and Relaxation, Keep Fit – Mature Movers, Keep Fit – Seated Exercise

    Jobseeker’s Learning Programmes
    Improving your skills for gaining employment, Adult Learning Service Work Club, Creating and updating your CV, Building up your confidence, interview skills and techniques, presentation skills, job applications

    Languages and Communication
    Arabic, French, German, Greek, Italian, Russian and Spanish. Also includes British Sign Language (BSL)

    Psychology
    Psychology GCSE

    Skills for Life (Foundation)
    Basic Skills, ESOL (English for Speakers of Other Languages), Return to work and learning, Programmes for those with learning difficulties

    Visual and Performing Arts
    Life Drawing, Watercolour Drawing, Painting and Drawing, Pottery, Woodwork, Silversmithing, Embroidery, Textiles, Jewellery, Mixed Crafts, Singing, Guitar, Banjo, Ukulele


    72(t) Calculator #annuity #early #withdrawal #penalty


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    72(t) Calculator

    The Internal Revenue Code section 72(t) and 72(q) can allow for penalty free early withdrawals from retirement accounts under certain circumstances. These sections can allow you to begin receiving money from your retirement accounts before you turn age 59-1/2 generally without the normal 10% premature distribution penalty. Use this calculator to determine your allowable 72(t)/(q) Distribution and how it maybe able to help fund your early retirement. The IRS rules regarding 72(t)/(q) Distributions are complex. Please consult a qualified professional when making decisions about your personal finances. Please note that your financial institution may or may not support all the methods displayed via this calculator.

    Javascript is required for this calculator. If you are using Internet Explorer, you may need to select to ‘Allow Blocked Content’ to view this calculator.

    For more information about these these financial calculators please visit: Dinkytown.net Financial Calculators from KJE Computer Solutions, Inc.

    72(t) Calculator Definitions

    Reasonable interest rate This is any rate less than or equal to 120% of the Federal Mid-Term rate for either of the two months immediately preceding the month in which the distribution begins. Click here for more information. **72TRATE_DEFINITION**

    It is important to note that the associated law that created 72(t) distributions did not define what was to be considered a reasonable interest rate. As such, the guidance from the IRS generally flows from the concept that they will not allow people to circumvent the requirement of substantially equal periodic payments (SEPP) throughout your lifetime by using an unreasonably high interest rate.

    72(t) withdrawals setup prior to January 2003, had some flexibility in the choice of the reasonable rate to use. However, in 2002, the IRS issued new rules stating that only rates less than or equal to 120% of the Federal Mid-Term rate would be considered reasonable. You are now required to use a rate that is less than or equal to 120% of the Federal Mid-Term rate for either of the two months immediately prior to the start of your distribution plan.

    Substantially Equal Periodic Payments (SEPP) The rules for 72(t)/(q) distributions require you to receive Substantially Equal Periodic Payments (SEPP) based on your life expectancy to avoid a 10% premature distribution penalty on any amounts you withdraw. Payments must last for five years (the five-year period does not end until the fifth anniversary of the first distribution received) or until you are 59-1/2, whichever is longer. Further, the SEPP amount must be calculated using one of the IRS approved methods which include:

    • Required minimum distribution method: This is the simplest method for calculating your SEPP, but it also typically produces the lowest payment. It simply takes your current balance and divides it by your single life expectancy or joint life expectancy. Your payment is then recalculated each year with your account balance as of December 31st of the preceding year and your current life expectancy. This is the only method that allows for a payment that will change as your account value changes. Even though this may provide the lowest payment, it may be the best distribution method if you expect wide fluctuations in the value of your account.
  • Fixed amortization method: With this method, the amount to be distributed annually is determined by amortizing your account balance over your single life expectancy, the uniform life expectancy table or joint life expectancy with your oldest named beneficiary.
  • Fixed annuitization method: This method uses an annuity factor to calculate your SEPP. This is one of the most complex methods. The IRS explains it as taking the taxpayer’s account balance divided by an annuity factor equal to the present value of an annuity of $1 per month beginning at the taxpayer’s age attained in the first distribution year and continuing for the life of the taxpayer. For example, if the annuity factor for a $1 per year annuity for an individual who is 50 years old is 19.087 (assuming an interest rate of 3.8% percent), an individual with a $100,000 account balance would receive an annual distribution of $5,239 ($100,000/19.087 = $5,239). This calculator uses the mortality table published in IRS Revenue Ruling 2002-62, which is a non-sex based mortality table. Please note that your annuitized SEPP is based on your life expectancy only, and is not based on the age of your beneficiary.
  • In addition, on July 3rd, 2002, the IRS ruled that you could change your distribution type one-time without penalty from the Annuitized or Amortized methods to the Required Minimum Distribution method. This would allow account holders the option to move from a fixed payment type to a payment that fluctuates annually with the value of their account. The primary reason for this exception is to allow individuals who have suffered large losses, the option to reduce their distribution to prevent their retirement account from being prematurely depleted. For more information on this important exception please see Revenue Ruling 2002-62 on www.treasury.gov.

    If payments are changed for any reason other than death or disability before the required distribution period ends, the distributions may be subject to a retroactive application of the Premature Distribution penalty. It is 10% (plus interest) for all years beginning the year such payments commenced and ending the year of the modification. It is important to remember that while 72(t) distributions are not subject to the 10% penalty for early withdrawal, all applicable taxes on the distributions must still be paid. Further, taking any early distributions from a retirement account reduces the amount of money available later during your retirement. Please contact a qualified professional for more information.

    Account balance The account balance used to determine the payment must be determined in a reasonable manner. For example, with a first distribution taken on July 15, 2013, it would be reasonable to determine the account balance based on the value of the IRA from December 31, 2013 to July 15, 2013. For subsequent years, the same valuation date should be used.

    Your age This is your current age. Use the age you will turn on your birthday for the year you are receiving the distribution.

    Beneficiary age This is your beneficiary’s age. Use the age your beneficiary will turn on their birthday for the year you are receiving the distribution. This entry is ignored if you do not use your Joint Life Expectancy to calculate your SEPP.

    Choose life expectancy tables There are three different life expectancy tables that the IRS allows you to use when calculating your SEPP with the ‘Fixed Amortization’ or the ‘Required Minimum Distribution’ methods. It is important to note that once you have chosen a distribution method and life expectancy table, you cannot change either throughout the course of your distributions. (Except for a one-time change from the Annuitized or Amortized methods to the Life Expectancy method, see SEPP definition for more details). The three life expectancy options are:

    This is a non-sex based table developed by the IRS to simplify minimum distribution requirements. The uniform lifetime table estimates joint survivorship, but does not use your beneficiary’s age to determine the resulting life expectancy. This table can be used by all account owners regardless of marital status or selected beneficiary.

    Single Life Expectancy

    This is a non-sex based life expectancy table. This table does not use your beneficiary’s age to calculate your life expectancy. This table can be used by all account owners regardless of marital status or selected beneficiary. Choosing single life expectancy will produce the highest distribution of the three available life expectancy tables.

    Joint Life Expectancy

    This is also a non-sex based life expectancy table for determining joint survivorship using your oldest named beneficiary.