Best Accredited Online Early Childhood Education Degrees of 2017

#online #masters #early #childhood #education


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Online Early Childhood Education Degree Programs Resource

Earning an early childhood education degree will prepare you for a rewarding career teaching young children, ranging in age from birth to eight or nine years old, which is traditionally about 3rd grade. Early childhood educators play a critical role in their students’ lives; they lay the foundation for a lifetime love of learning. They may also be expected to identify and instruct children with special needs, learning disabilities, or developmental delays. The ideal candidate for an early childhood education job will be service oriented, with good communication and active listening skills. The job requires dependability, integrity, and adaptability. Many schools offer an early childhood education degree online, which can allow a student to study on their own time and at their own pace, often while maintaining regular employment.

How to Become an Early Childhood Teacher

Each state requires early childhood educators to have a bachelor’s degree and certification from a traditional or alternative teacher preparation program, and certification requirements vary from state to state. Many new teachers receive support from mentoring programs during their first years on the job.

Teacher Quote: You should only choose education as your career if you are willing to put your whole self into it; don’t do it if you are just halfway in. You will have a classroom full of children depending on you to teach and care for them. For some, you will be all they have. You must be willing to go the extra mile for them and you must love what you do in order to make that happen. -April Larremore, Texas Kindergarten Teacher

Early Childhood Education Degree Requirements and Coursework

Coursework for a bachelor’s degree in early childhood education typically includes classes in language and literacy, child growth and development, equity and cultural diversity, curriculum design, and theories in instruction. Most early childhood education programs will also require student teaching.

Early childhood education degree programs are formatted to give pre-service teachers a specialist education in working with Pre-K to grade 3. This degree is a good fit for students who wish to teach at these grade levels and achieve state-level certification. Many programs offer coursework leading to specialist endorsements in such areas as reading, English as a second language, and special education.

Typical classes in an early education degree program may include:

  • Introduction to Early Childhood Education
  • Language Development in Early Childhood
  • Beginning Literacy
  • Assessment and Evaluation in Early Childhood Education
  • Language Arts and Reading for Early Childhood
  • Science for Young Children
  • Child Health and Safety
  • Student Teaching and Professional Practicum

Early Childhood Education Degrees and Certification

Completing an early childhood education degree program will qualify you to seek positions in both public and private schools. Daycare centers, preschools, kindergartens, and elementary schools are the most common places of employment for those with a degree in early childhood education. Salary ranges widely, depending upon what kind of setting an educator works in. The median annual wage for preschool teachers is $28,570 per year, while daycare workers earn a median salary of $26,210. 1 The median annual salary for kindergarten and elementary school teachers is $54,550. 2 The Bureau of Labor Statistics estimates job growth between 6 and 7% for these teacher groups through 2024. 1,2

Bachelor s Degree in Early Childhood Education

A bachelor s degree in early childhood education prepares an instructor to teach small children, including infants and small children up to the third grade. They help children develop social, personal, and academic skills to properly prepare them for higher levels of education. These educators must align their teaching to education standards which are constantly changing and improving while also acting as caregivers who care for small children in their parents absence. Early childhood teachers must have skill and passion for working with children. Self-motivation, creativity, patience, a love of teaching, and the ability to demonstrate cooperation are attributes that complement this career. Teachers at this level must be able to create a safe, educational, and caring environment where children are able to maximize their potential and achieve or surpass learning milestones.

Master s Degree in Early Childhood Education

Students graduating with a master s degree in early childhood education are prepared to work as senior teachers in elementary school settings. Many universities only offer early childhood education master s degree programs to students who are already certified to teach in elementary settings, so earning a bachelor s degree and state certification is the first step. Many online degree programs offer master s degrees in early childhood education. Teachers who have earned a master s degree often have higher earning potential than those with only a bachelor s degree and can be more competitive candidates for administrative positions.

Early Childhood Education Degree Online

Prospective Pre-K to 3 educators can also pursue an online bachelor s degree in early childhood education. An online early childhood education degree program can offer additional flexibility compared to on-campus study for individuals who prefer this option. Online education continues to improve with innovations like live streaming virtual classrooms with video conferencing and use of interactive social technologies that allow collaboration and discussion with classmates.

Profiles of Early Childhood Education Programs

Texas A M University
Texas A M University offers an Early Childhood generalist certification program for teacher certification in elementary school to Grade 6. An intensive series of field placements that give students an active role in actual classrooms are built around blocks of methods-based learning for classroom and learning management. Students admitted to the program receive personalized advising throughout their studies, with one-on-one advising sessions scheduled at least once per semester. All College of Education students have access to financial assistance packages, global education experiences, and personalized learning communities, including an undergraduate peer mentor program for academically talented pre-service teachers. An Education Career Fair is held once per semester to give students the opportunity to network with potential employers. As the largest producer of teachers in high-demand fields in the state of Texas, Texas A M University can give Aggie graduates a competitive edge in the career marketplace.

University of Central Florida
The College of Education and Human Performance at the University of Central Florida offers a Bachelor of Science in Early Childhood Development and Education that leads to teacher certification for Pre-Kindergarten through Grade 3. The program track includes the ESOL and Reading Endorsements in line with Florida Educator Accomplished Practices (FEAP). Field experiences begin early in the course sequencing, integrating theory and practice learned in the classroom in real school settings. Student reflection is encouraged through a continuously faculty-reviewed personal professional portfolio. The program curriculum emphasizes the creation of safe and nurturing environments for all young children in education partnerships with family and the community. Although this degree is not a fully online degree, many classes are offered in hybrid classroom/online formats, and select courses are delivered through online instruction. In addition to school-wide scholarships, the College of Education and Human Performance offers several scholarships that are only available to Early Childhood Development and Education students.

Kent State University
Kent State University’s Early Childhood Education program leads to the award of a Bachelor of Science in Early Childhood Education (ECED). Field experience is heavily emphasized in the curriculum, with field placements and teaching experiences occurring in classroom settings at the Pre-K and K-3 levels. The ECED program holds accreditation from the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) and the Ohio State Department of Education. The College of Education, Health, and Human Services at Kent State is also a member of the Consortium for Overseas Student Teaching, which offers overseas student teaching placements to qualified students. Program graduates may be interested in earning a second license or endorsement through one of Kent State University’s numerous other education programs. An Early Childhood Generalist Endorsement for Grades 4-5 may be added to the P-3 Teaching License after Block IV of the ECED program is completed; the Grades 4-5 endorsement is an online program.

Top Early Childhood Education Blogs

See our list with reviews of top early childhood education blogs that provide an inside look into the classrooms and practices of current early childhood education teachers.

Interviews with Early Childhood Education Teachers

See our teacher interview series to read career interviews with current teachers who share their experiences, insights, and advice for early childhood education teachers.

Teaching and Education Programs


Early childhood masters degree, early childhood masters degree.

#Early #childhood #masters #degree


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Concordia University, St. PaulAcademic Programs

Early childhood masters degree Early childhood masters degree

Early childhood masters degree

Programs

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Early childhood masters degree

Early childhood masters degree

Early childhood masters degree

Early childhood masters degree Early childhood masters degree Early childhood masters degree Early childhood masters degree Early childhood masters degree

Contact Concordia

Concordia University, St. Paul

1282 Concordia Avenue, St. Paul, MN 55104

Registrar (Transcripts): 651.641.8233

TTY: Deaf or Hard of Hearing Callers MN Relay (711)

Accreditation

Concordia University, St. Paul is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission and is a member of the North Central Association. Concordia University, St. Paul has been accredited since 1967, with reaccreditation given in 2008.

Early childhood masters degreeEarly childhood masters degreeEarly childhood masters degreeEarly childhood masters degree


Early Ford V-8 Club #car #comparison


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Welcome to the Early Ford V-8 Club of America

An International Organization

Founded in San Leandro, California in 1963, our club recognizes all Ford Motor Company vehicles made between 1932 and 1953, including Ford, Lincoln, Mercury, commercial vehicles, tractors and other Ford powered vehicles built around the world utilizing the 4, 6, 8, and 12 cylinder engines produced by Ford Motor Company.

Today, as the Marquee Club of our represented vehicles, with membership of over 9,000 and 125 Regional Groups worldwide, we are dedicated to the restoration and preservation of all Ford Motor Company vehicles built between 1932 and 1953.

The club’s award-winning, bi-monthly magazine, the V-8 Times, is circulated all over the world and is acclaimed as one of the best car club magazines anywhere. The V-8 Times features technical articles, shop tips, questions and answers by our panel of experts, nostalgia, club and regional group news, offerings of accessories and restoration manuals found nowhere else – plus classified ads for cars and parts.

If you’re not already a member, we invite you to Join Today and explore the works of the Early Ford V-8 Club of America.



Early Ford V-8 Club


#v cars
#

Welcome to the Early Ford V-8 Club of America

An International Organization

Founded in San Leandro, California in 1963, our club recognizes all Ford Motor Company vehicles made between 1932 and 1953, including Ford, Lincoln, Mercury, commercial vehicles, tractors and other Ford powered vehicles built around the world utilizing the 4, 6, 8, and 12 cylinder engines produced by Ford Motor Company.

Today, as the Marquee Club of our represented vehicles, with membership of over 9,000 and 125 Regional Groups worldwide, we are dedicated to the restoration and preservation of all Ford Motor Company vehicles built between 1932 and 1953.

The club’s award-winning, bi-monthly magazine, the V-8 Times, is circulated all over the world and is acclaimed as one of the best car club magazines anywhere. The V-8 Times features technical articles, shop tips, questions and answers by our panel of experts, nostalgia, club and regional group news, offerings of accessories and restoration manuals found nowhere else – plus classified ads for cars and parts.

If you’re not already a member, we invite you to Join Today and explore the works of the Early Ford V-8 Club of America.



Accredited Early Childhood Programs #associate #degree #early #childhood #education


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Capital Community College
A.S. Early Childhood Education

Housatonic Community College
A.S. Early Childhood Inclusive Education (formerly available as A.S. Early Childhood Education or A.S. Early Childhood Education with Special Education Option)

Manchester Community College
A.S. Early Childhood Education

Middlesex Community College
A.S. Early Childhood Education

Northwestern Connecticut Community College
A.S. Early Childhood Education

Norwalk Community College
A.S. Early Childhood Education–Career Program
A.S. Early Childhood Education–Transfer Program

Quinebaug Valley Community College
A.S. Early Childhood Education

Three Rivers Community College
A.S. Early Childhood Education

 F

FLORIDA

Miami Dade College
A.S. Early Childhood Education (General, Infant/Toddler, Preschool, and Education Administrator tracks)

GEORGIA

Chattahoochee Technical College
A.A.S. Early Childhood Care Education

Gwinnett Technical College
A.A.S. Early Childhood Care and Education

H

HAWAII

INDIANA

Ivy Tech Community College-Central Indiana (Indianapolis)
A.S. Early Childhood Education
A.S. Early Childhood Education
(transfer track to Ball State University)
A.S. Early Childhood Education
(transfer track to Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis)

Ivy Tech Community College-Gary
A.A.S. Early Childhood Education
A.S. Early Childhood Education

Ivy Tech Community College-Kokomo
A.A.S. Early Childhood Education
A.S. Early Childhood Education
(transfer track to Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis)
A.S. Early Childhood Education
(transfer track to Indiana University-Purdue University Fort Wayne)

Ivy Tech Community College-Northeast/Fort Wayne
A.S. Early Childhood Education
(articulating to Indiana University-Purdue University Fort Wayne Elementary Education)
A.A.S. Early Childhood Education

Ivy Tech Community College-Southern/Sellersburg
A.S. Early Childhood Education
A.A.S. Early Childhood Education

IOWA

Johnston Community College
A.A.S. Early Childhood Education

Martin Community College
A.A.S. Early Childhood

McDowell Technical Community College
A.A.S. Early Childhood Education

Nash Community College
A.A.S. Early Childhood Education

Richmond Community College
A.A.S. Early Childhood Education

Robeson Community College
A.A.S. Early Childhood: Administration Track
A.A.S. Early Childhood: Articulation Track

Rowan-Cabarrus Community College
A.A.S. Early Childhood Education

Sampson Community College
A.A.S. Early Childhood Education

South Piedmont Community College
A.A.S. Early Childhood Education

Stanly Community College
A.A.S. Early Childhood Education

Wake Technical Community College
A.A.S. Early Childhood Education

Wayne Community College
A.A.S. Early Childhood Education

O

OHIO

Central Ohio Technical College
A.A.S. Early Childhood Education Technology (formerly known as A.A.S. ECD Technology, Teaching Option and A.A.S. ECD Technology, Early Childhood Development)

Cuyahoga Community College
A.A.S. Early Childhood Education

Lakeland Community College

A.A.S. Early Childhood Education

Owens Community College
A.A.S. Early Childhood Education Technology

OKLAHOMA

Oklahoma City Community College
A.A. University Parallel Child Development
A.A.S. Technical and Occupational Child Development

Oklahoma State University-Oklahoma City
A.A.S. Early Care Education

Tulsa Community College
A.S. Child Development Child and Family, OSU Transfer Option
A.S. Child Development Human and Family Services/Early Care, NSU Transfer Option
A.A.S. Child Development Center Director Option
A.A.S. Child Development Early Childhood Option
A.A.S. Child Development Infant/Toddler Option

Western Oklahoma State College(full degree available online)
A.S. Early Childhood
A.A.S. Child Development

OREGON

Portland Community College
A.A.S. Early Education and Family Studies

Southwestern Oregon Community College(full degree available online)
A.S. Childhood Education and Family Studies
A.A.S. Childhood Education and Family Studies

P

PENNSYLVANIA

Delaware County Community College
A.A. Early Childhood Education

Harcum College
A.A. Early Childhood Education

Harrisburg Area Community College
A.A. Early Childhood–Elementary Education–Early Care and Education Track
A.A. Early Childhood–Elementary Education–Pre-Teaching Track

Lehigh Carbon Community College
A.A.S. Early Childhood Education
A.A.S. Early Childhood Education Early Intervention

Montgomery County Community College
A.A. Education in the Early Years: Birth Through Fourth Grade

Northampton Community College(full degree available online)
A.A.S. Early Childhood Education: Infant to Grade 4

Pennsylvania College of Technology
A.A.S. Early Childhood Education

RHODE ISLAND

Community College of Rhode Island

A.A. Early Childhood Education and Child Development

S

SOUTH CAROLINA

Aiken Technical College
A.A.S. Early Care and Education

Central Carolina Technical College
A.A.S. Early Care and Education

Denmark Technical College
A.A.S. Early Care and Education

Greenville Technical College
A.A.S. Early Care and Education

Horry-Georgetown Technical College
A.A.S Early Care and Education

Midlands Technical College
A.A.S. Early Care and Education

Orangeburg-Calhoun Technical College
A.A.S. Early Care and Education

Piedmont Technical College
A.A.S. Early Care and Education

Spartanburg Community College
A.A.S Early Childhood Development–Early Care and Education (formerly known as A.A.S. Advanced Child Care Management and A.A.S. Infant/Toddler)

Technical College of the Lowcountry
A.A.S. Early Care and Education

TriCounty Technical College
A.A.S. Early Childhood Development

Trident Technical College
A.A.S. Early Care and Education Child Care Professional Career Path
A.A.S. Early Care and Education Child Care Management Career Path
A.A.S. Early Care and Education Special Education Career Path

Williamsburg Technical College
A.A.S. Early Care and Education

York Technical College
A.A.S. Early Care and Education

T

TENNESSEE

Chattanooga State Community College
A.A.S. Early Childhood Education

Dyersburg State Community College
A.A.S. Early Childhood Education

Motlow State Community College
A.A.S. Early Childhood Education

Nashville State Community College
A.A.S. Early Childhood Education

Northeast State Community College
A.A.S. Early Childhood Education

Pellissippi State Community College
A.A.S. Early Childhood Education

Walters State Community College
A.A.S. Early Childhood Education

TEXAS

Collin College
A.A.S. Child Development

Eastfield College(full degree available online)
A.A.S. Child Development Early Childhood Education

Houston Community College
A.A.S. Child Development

San Antonio College
A.A.S. Early Childhood Studies

San Jacinto College – Central Campus
A.A.S. Child Development/Early Childhood Education

St. Philip s College(full degree available online)
A.A.S. Early Childhood Studies
A.A.S. Early Childhood Studies – Language and Literacy Specialization

Wharton County Junior College
A.A.S. Early Childhood/Child Development

W

WISCONSIN

Milwaukee Area Technical College
A.A.S. Early Childhood Education



Early Intervention Specialist Training and Degree Program Information #masters #in #early #intervention, #early #intervention #specialist #training #and #degree #program #information


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Early Intervention Specialist Training and Degree Program Information

said it was important to communicate with colleges during the search process. (Source: Noel-Levitz 2012 trend study)

Select a school or program

  • EdD in Organizational Leadership – Special Education
  • Ed.D. in Organizational Leadership – Behavioral Health
  • M.Ed. in Special Education: Cross-Categorical
  • M.Ed. in Master of Education in Early Childhood Education and Early Childhood Special Education-ITL
  • M.Ed. in Master of Education in Early Childhood Education and Early Childhood Special Education-NITL
  • M.A. in Autism Spectrum Disorders
  • MA in Curriculum and Instruction
  • MA in Gifted Education
  • BS in Elementary Education / Special Education (Dual Major)
  • Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education
  • BS in Early Childhood
  • B.S. in Early Childhood Education and Early Childhood Special Education
  • B.S. in Elementary Education with an Emphasis in Christian Education
  • View all programs
    • MA in Education and Human Development in Secondary Special Education and Transition Services
    • MA in Education and Human Development in Special Education for Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Learners
    • MA in Education and Human Development in Organizational Leadership and Learning
    • Graduate Certificate in Special Education for Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Learners
    • Graduate Certificate in Transition Special Education
    • View all programs
  • View More Schools

    Show Me Schools

    Home visits, family consultations, and field experiences

    Early intervention specialist programs require a bachelor’s degree for admission. Many certificate programs require a teacher’s license. Certificate programs usually consist of fewer than 10 courses, and some prerequisite courses in the fundamentals of special education are required. The courses cover assessment of children with disabilities, program planning, and current issues in special education. An internship in a classroom is mandatory. In addition to a bachelor’s degree, some graduate certificate programs require proof that an applicant is certified in preschool or primary education. They may also require students to complete prerequisite coursework in child development, special education, and legal issues prior to admission. Furthermore, students should demonstrate competency in concepts closely related to their chosen specialization, such as sign language for those specializing in teaching children with hearing impairments.

    The length of a master’s program varies, depending on if the student is pursuing initial certification. In addition to classroom work, the program includes home visits, family consultations, and field experiences working with children of differing ages. Courses teach students about assessments and goals as well as instructional strategies. Some master’s programs may offer general teacher education in addition to training in early intervention. Some programs are available online.

    Licensure Certificate Programs

    Early intervention specialist licensure certificate programs prepare students to provide intervention services to disabled children from birth to age five. These post-baccalaureate programs also qualify students for state certification in early childhood intervention. Programs cover topics like child care, family support, and nutrition. Students additionally learn about the early identification of disabilities and abnormalities, advocacy, and family-focused intervention. Graduates apply their skills to the intensive care and education of children experiencing a range of disabilities.

    Students gain skills required to design, implement, and monitor early intervention services and advocate on behalf of children with disabilities. Coursework provides an understanding of team approaches to working with disabled children and the importance of working with multiple agencies to reach intervention goals. Programs include courses in:

    • Infant and child development and growth
    • Nutrition
    • Educational practices and programming
    • Curriculum activities
    • Screening and assessment
    • Instructional planning for young children

    Find schools that offer these popular programs

    • Teaching Gifted and Talented Students
    • Teaching Special Education – Autism
    • Teaching Special Education – Developmentally Delayed
    • Teaching Special Education – Emotional Disturbances
    • Teaching Special Education – Hearing Impairments
    • Teaching Special Education – Learning Disabilities
    • Teaching Special Education – Mental Retardation
    • Teaching Special Education – Multiple Disabilities
    • Teaching Special Education – Orthopedic Impairments
    • Teaching Special Education – Speech Impairments
    • Teaching Special Education – Traumatic Brain Injuries
    • Teaching Special Education – Vision Impairments
    • Teaching Special Education, Children and Young Children

    Master’s Degree Programs

    Master’s degree programs in early childhood intervention prepare students to work with young children with or at risk of developing special needs. Students learn concepts related to instructional methods, behavioral management, the needs of special education learners, and the technologies used in special education environments. Programs qualify students for state special education teacher licensing for young children. Some programs also offer separate options for students already possessing their initial teaching licensure, and for students wishing to acquire standard licensure.

    Students focus their learning in a specific area of early intervention, such as teaching the hearing impaired. As a result, course topics will reflect each student’s selected career track. Programs may include courses such as:

    • Language, hearing development, and sign language
    • Teaching literacy to deaf children
    • Applying technology in special education
    • Phonics and language structure
    • Special needs learning assessment
    • Interventions for special needs learners

    Popular Career Options

    Graduates of master’s degree programs have several career options in special education and intervention programs. Graduates find work in rehabilitative programs, hospitals, not-for-profit organizations, and schools. Some popular career options include the following:

    • Developmental specialist
    • Teacher
    • Early interventionist

    Licensing Information

    Graduates seeking teaching opportunities in public schools must gain state licensure prior to gaining employment. Licensure requirements are determined by each state and generally require that an individual has a minimum of a bachelor’s degree, has graduated from an approved teaching program, and has supervised teaching experience. Some states additionally offer a general special education license or licenses for specific areas.

    Employment Outlook and Salary

    The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that special education teachers could expect average job growth of 6% from 2014 – 2024. Special education preschool teachers reported median annual earnings of $53,990 as of 2015.

    Early intervention specialist programs require a bachelor’s degree for admission and provide training in a number of areas relevant to working with special needs children.

    Next: View Schools

    • EdD in Organizational Leadership – Special Education
    • Ed.D. in Organizational Leadership – Behavioral Health
    • M.Ed. in Special Education: Cross-Categorical
    • M.Ed. in Master of Education in Early Childhood Education and Early Childhood Special Education-ITL
    • M.Ed. in Master of Education in Early Childhood Education and Early Childhood Special Education-NITL
    • M.A. in Autism Spectrum Disorders
    • MA in Curriculum and Instruction
    • MA in Gifted Education
    • BS in Elementary Education / Special Education (Dual Major)
    • Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education
    • BS in Early Childhood
    • B.S. in Early Childhood Education and Early Childhood Special Education
    • B.S. in Elementary Education with an Emphasis in Christian Education
    • View more
    • MA in Education and Human Development in Secondary Special Education and Transition Services
    • MA in Education and Human Development in Special Education for Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Learners
    • MA in Education and Human Development in Organizational Leadership and Learning
    • Graduate Certificate in Special Education for Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Learners
    • Graduate Certificate in Transition Special Education
    • View more
    • Master of Science in Education in Special Education


  • Doctoral Programs #concordia #university #chicago #s #college #of #graduate #and #innovative #programs #has #highly #ranked, #on-campus, #cohort #and #online #programs. #we #offer #masters, #post-masters, #endorsements, #certifications #and #doctoral #programs #in #education, #business, #humanities #and #leadership. # #/ # #meta #id= #metakeywords # #name= #keywords # #content= #concordia #university, #chicago, #illinois, #graduate #degree #programs, #master #s #degree, #master #s #programs, #ma #programs, #doctoral #degrees, #doctoral #programs, #edd, #mba, #mbas, #master #of #business #administration, #master #s #of #business #administration, #education, #early #childhood #education, #teaching, #reading, #christian #education, #curriculum #and #instruction, #c #amp;i, #esl, #esl #endorsement, #educational #technology, #school #counseling, #school #leadership, #accelerated #degree #completion, #adult #education


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    Doctoral Programs

    Welcome to Concordia University Chicago and thank you for your interest in applying to one of our doctoral programs. All documents relating to admission should be submitted to Concordia University’s Office of Graduate Admission and Student Services prior to the deadline for your anticipated term of enrollment. See your degree of interest on this Web site for application and file completion deadlines.

    Admission Requirements

    Admission to the doctoral program occurs prior to initiation of course work. The number of students admitted will be limited to ensure quality of program and dissertation advising.

    Applicants who are successful in their application for admission for entrance into the doctoral program will meet the following criteria:

    • Master’s degree with a minimum 3.0 GPA
    • A completed Doctoral Application for Admission
    • Submission of rationale statement, including personal goals for applying for admission to the program.
    • Transcripts: Submission of official transcripts of all previous credits.
    • Testing: Current Graduate Record Exam or Miller Analogies Test scores (test taken within the prior three years).
    • Letters of recommendation from two persons qualified to comment upon the applicant’s potential for doctoral study.
    • Past experience: At least two years of successful teaching/administrative experience (required only for doctoral programs in K-12 education).
    • Writing sample: Submit a paper that demonstrates your ability to write in a scholarly manner at a level typical of graduate work. A paper from your master’s program would be most appropriate. This sample should approach, but not exceed, five pages in length.

    All documents should be submitted to:

    Office of Graduate Admission and Student Services
    Concordia University Chicago
    7400 Augusta Street
    River Forest, IL 60305

    The office fax number is (708) 209-3454.

    Once the admission file is completed and initially reviewed, qualified applicants will complete an extemporaneous writing sample followed by a personal interview with an admission committee.

    Admission recommendations are submitted from the admission committee to the Dean of the College of Education, who will then make the final admission decision and communicate the decision to the candidate. The admission committee may establish an admission waiting list, if necessary. Students admitted should consult the Doctoral Program Handbook for additional program information.

    Students who are applying for admission to the doctoral program are precluded from enrolling in any courses which met doctoral program requirements until the student has been completely admitted to the program.

    The Graduate Admission Committee reserves the right to request additional information or documentation deemed helpful in evaluating applicants for admission.

    Additional Testing

    Depending on program of study, students may be required to take additional tests such as the Graduate Record Exam, Miller Analogies Test and/or the Illinois Basic Skills Test. A writing sample, essay, FBI fingerprint criminal background check, valid teaching certificate and/or interview may also be required to determine what may be necessary for a student to qualify for a graduate program.

    Pending Status

    Doctoral and international students are not eligible for Pending Status .

    International Students

    Applicants who are not U.S. citizens are required to meet all admission standards listed for the program they wish to enter. In addition, the following are required to be considered for admission:

    • TOEFL: A score of at least 550 (paper-based) or 72 (internet) minimum requirement on the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL), or successful completion of Level 112 at an English Language School (ELS) unless English is the native language, and an unqualified recommendation from an ELS program director is provided. (International students who have earned an advanced degree from an accredited institution in the United States do not need to submit TOEFL scores.)
    • Transcripts: Official transcripts from each college/university attended showing all college/university course work with certified English translations of all transcripts originally prepared in any other language. Also, any international transcripts must be evaluated by a Concordia-approved international credentialing service such as WES (World Education Services), ECE (Educational Credential Evaluators), or AACRAO (American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admission Officers).
    • Financial Support: A certified document guaranteeing adequate financial support for at least the student’s first year of study and, barring any unforeseen circumstances, adequate funding from the same or an equally dependable source, for subsequent years.
    • Medical: A physical exam, adequate medical insurance, and proof of immunization are required prior to enrollment.
    • Regular Admission Requirements: International students must qualify for regular admission to a degree program in order to enroll.

    All documents must be received by the Office of Graduate Admission and Enrollment Services at least three months prior to the expected date of entry. I-20 forms may be issued only after University acceptance is granted and will remain in effect only for students who continue to make satisfactory progress as full-time students in an accepted university program. The program length may vary for each student.

    Application information



    Master s Degree in Early Childhood Education Online (MEd) #masters #in #early #childhood #education,early #childhood #education #masters #degree,master #of #ed #in #early #childhood #education,early #childhood #education #masters #of #education,online #masters #of #education,masters #in #education #online


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    MEd in Curriculum Instruction: Early Childhood Education

    This Early Childhood Education (ECE) concentration is designed for those who have a strong passion for teaching young children and who believe that children learn best through active, hands-on learning. Candidates will explore current trends and research, design developmentally effective curriculum, and develop skills in advocating for young children.

    The Next Start Date is July 17th

    MEd in Curriculum Instruction: Early Childhood Education Program Goals

    In addition to meeting the objectives for all Concordia Portland’s MEd programs, successful candidates in the MEd in Curriculum Instruction: Early Childhood Education concentration will demonstrate:

    • Expertise in the utilization of new methods of authentic assessment and strategies as tools to evaluate student learning progress in relation to Oregon’s Common Core State Standards and specific district standards.
    • Effective instructional skills in planning, implementing, and assessing instruction in settings that include diverse cultural populations and special needs students.
    • An understanding of the ways that the specific curricular/instructional area has the potential to be responsive to classroom diversity.
    • A clear understanding of the moral leadership required of them as advanced scholars in the chosen area of curriculum and instruction.
    • The ability to modify instructional plans and promote alternative goals and strategies when necessary, particularly in relation to assessment results.

    Course Descriptions

    Students enrolled in the Early Childhood Education program must complete:

    • Four core courses required for the Curriculum Instruction degree
    • Foundation courses for the specific concentration

    MEd in Curriculum & Instruction – Core Courses

    Developing Character Through the Curriculum

    This course will provide teachers with the resources and skills necessary to integrate character themes and character development into their school curriculum. It provides a forum in which to discuss and develop one’s own moral perspectives on the basis of generally accepted criteria.

    Theories of Teaching and Learning

    This course is designed to provide leaders with the latest psychological research about learning and guide them in exploring ways to directly apply these precepts to their current work setting. Topics will include cognitive science, learning theory, and relevant teaching theories that utilize this information. The course will fuse the latest biological and psychological understanding of how the brain learns so candidates can harness this knowledge and apply it directly to learning situations.

    Community of Learners

    Relationships constructed on trust are critical for an efficient, collegial, collaborative workplace. This course challenges candidates to confront the tremendous diversity in their current environment and develop strategies to build community in the midst of the social, ethnic, economic and alternative lifestyle differences that permeate today’s 21st century workplace. In sum, this course stresses the critical importance of creating community in the workplace and illustrates how that community, once established, can generate an efficient, supportive, and positive work place.

    Contemporary Educational Thought

    Candidates identify, review, and analyze major trends and issues impacting the contemporary state and national educational scenes. Each class session provides students with an opportunity to evaluate the advantages and liabilities of current educational reforms and issues from the perspective of prevailing educational research as well as from their own personal beliefs and current work environment. Candidates will also consider how they can impact and influence change in their own workplace.

    MEd in Curriculum & Instruction – Early Childhood Education

    Issues and Advocacy in ECE

    This course provides an overview of the field of early childhood education by exploring its past, present and future. Significant issues focusing on advocacy for children and families will be addressed in terms of the interpretation of research, philosophical approaches, and application of theory. Students will become familiar with advocacy for children and families at the local, state, and national levels.

    ECE: A Constructivist Approach

    This course focuses on curriculum development in pre-kindergarten and the primary grades from a constructivist perspective. Emphasis is placed on facilitating child-centered learning and implementing authentic assessment practices within State prescribed standards and benchmarks. This course is specifically designed for classroom teachers willing to explore the opportunities of project-based learning.

    Play in Early Childhood Education

    This course focuses on the relationship between play and learning for young children (birth through age eight). It is based on the philosophy that children construct knowledge while actively engaged in the process of understanding the world around them. Strategies for implementing play opportunities in the preschool and primary curriculum will be accentuated in order that the student may create a classroom environment that supports playful learning.

    This course examines the development of literacy skills in young children, ages 0-8. Topics include the reading/writing connection, use of trade books and thematic literature, and current research in the field of literacy development.

    This course provides students with the basic competencies necessary to understand and evaluate the research of others, and to plan their own research with a minimum of assistance. This course includes the basics of both qualitative and quantitative research.

    The Master of Education culminates with one of three additional research courses:

    The Master of Education culminates with one of three additional research courses

    Practitioner Inquiry focuses on the reflective acts of the candidate as an educator seeking to improve teaching practice. Premised in the self-study research methodological traditions (Samaras, 2011), Practitioner Inquiry provides the opportunity to reflect on teaching practice and generate improvements based on classroom observation. Practitioner Inquiry focuses on the educator and her/his own practices, developing skills of inquiry, observation, reflection, and action in teachers. Prerequisite: Successful completion of EDGR 601 Educational Research

    Action research is one of the capstone projects for the Master of Education program. During this five-week course, candidates will learn more about the action research methodology, complete final edits of the Literature Review, and design a complete Action Research proposal including data collection methods and analysis approaches. (During this course, the proposal will NOT be implemented with students/participants.)
    This design provides students with the requisite skills and means to pursue the transformative practice called “Action Research” in their classroom, school, district or other work environment. The design method for the capstone project closely aligns with current classroom realities, with district and school requirements, and the needs of teachers and students.

    The Thesis offers the graduate student the opportunity to investigate, in depth, a topic in the field of education. The student, working with his or her thesis instructor, will explore relevant literature and present a thesis following the procedure established by the College of Education.

    Any of the above options provide candidates with an understanding of the role of research in the field of education as a tool to solve problems and as a way to improve student learning.

    Earning Your Curriculum Instruction: Early Childhood Education Master’s Degree Online

    The Master of Education in Curriculum and Instruction: Early Childhood Education program is fully online. The online format uses cutting-edge curriculum and easy-to-use online learning tools to provide students with a convenient yet challenging educational experience. Online classes are 5 weeks in length and can be accessed via Internet



    Early Ford V-8 Club #hybrid #car


    #v cars
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    Welcome to the Early Ford V-8 Club of America

    An International Organization

    Founded in San Leandro, California in 1963, our club recognizes all Ford Motor Company vehicles made between 1932 and 1953, including Ford, Lincoln, Mercury, commercial vehicles, tractors and other Ford powered vehicles built around the world utilizing the 4, 6, 8, and 12 cylinder engines produced by Ford Motor Company.

    Today, as the Marquee Club of our represented vehicles, with membership of over 9,000 and 125 Regional Groups worldwide, we are dedicated to the restoration and preservation of all Ford Motor Company vehicles built between 1932 and 1953.

    The club’s award-winning, bi-monthly magazine, the V-8 Times, is circulated all over the world and is acclaimed as one of the best car club magazines anywhere. The V-8 Times features technical articles, shop tips, questions and answers by our panel of experts, nostalgia, club and regional group news, offerings of accessories and restoration manuals found nowhere else – plus classified ads for cars and parts.

    If you’re not already a member, we invite you to Join Today and explore the works of the Early Ford V-8 Club of America.



    Early Childhood Programs – The Guidance Center #early #childhood #colleges


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    Early Childhood Education

    Our Early Childhood Education programs help nurture the social and emotional development of very young (to age 5) children. We offer:

    • pre-kindergarten class (Mamaroneck, New Rochelle)
    • therapeutic nursery, full and half day (New Rochelle)
    • toddler class for children 18-36 months (OPENING January 2017, New Rochelle)
    • SEIT services for children ages 3-5 years old

    The Creative Learning Center. located in New Rochelle, meets the individual needs of typically developing children as well as those with special needs. Together, they learn, play and thrive! The Creative Learning Center has a full-day preschool class as well as special needs classes and Universal Pre-K. They also offer working-parent friendly hours of 7:30 am to 6:00 pm. We will offer a new toddler class (18-36 months) starting in January 2017! Contact us about enrollment .

    Mamaroneck UPK, located at Central School in the Mamaroneck school district, offers half-day Universal Pre-Kindergarten classes (morning or afternoon) 5 days per week. Our program is a school readiness model for all children who will be eligible for Kindergarten the following year (4 year olds). Children gain skills through our facilitated play and supported social/emotional curriculums, and build a love of learning through interactions with each other, their teachers and their environment.

    To be eligible for the Mamaroneck UPK program for the 2017-2018 school year children must reside in the Mamaroneck Union Free School district, and must turn 4 in the 2017 calendar year. We are currently accepting applications! Follow this link to the school district’s website for registration forms and information. This intake form must also be completed. To learn more, please contact us .

    Foundations in Feelings is an innovative approach for addressing the social-emotional development needs of very young children. Designed to support the social-emotional development of children while working with childcare providers and parents, Foundations in Feelingswas once only available to select daycare centers but is now available to all.

    FREE Programs for Families of Children with autism and developmental delays now take place at our Creative Learning Center two Sundays a month. We have a montly parent-only support group as well as free counseling services for individuals or couples. Funded in part by the Office of People with Developmental Delays.

    For more information on our Early Childhood programs, email us or call 914-613-0700 x7012 .

    Our Programs



    Courses – Derby Adult Learning Service #basic #skills, #esol, #return #to #work #and #learning, #learning #difficulties, #maths #gcse, #business, #book-keeping, #teacher #training, #computers, #clait, #ecdl, #word #processing, #it #courses, #hospitality, #sports #and #leisure, #aromatherapy, #mendhi, #sugarcraft, #aerobics, #fitness, #keep #fit, #badminton, #wine #appreciation, #yoga, #pilates, #tv #repairs, #health, #social #care #and #public #service, #counselling, #deaf #awareness, #early #years #education, #pre-retirement, #visual, #performing #arts, #art, #dancing, #woodwork, #pottery, #singing, #song #writing, #embroidery, #craft #and #jewellery, #guitar, #painting, #rug #making, #sewing, #languages, #communication, #english #as #a #foreign #language, #english #gcse, #creative #writing, #french, #german, #italian, #spanish, #greek, #sign #language


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    Derby Adult Learning Service provides hundreds of courses in Derby for you to choose from in a whole range of subjects. Select one of the learning areas below for a list of related courses available:

    Computing
    Computing for beginners, Internet and Email, European Computer Driving License (ECDL), Digital Photography, Various entry level courses

    Cookery and Baking
    Introduction to Cookery, Italian, Indian Cookery, All about Chocolate, Wine Appreciation

    Education Training
    Supporting Teaching and Learning in Schools
    City and Guilds – Train the Trainer Level 3 Award in Education and Training and Level 4 Certificate in Education and Training

    English and Maths
    Brush up on your English, Improve your maths skills, English GCSE, Maths GCSE

    Hospitality, Sports and Leisure
    Wine Appreciation including WSET (Wines, Spirits, Educational Trust) Level 2 and 3 Qualifications, Italian Cookery, Indian Cookery, Yoga, Tai Chi for Health and Relaxation, Keep Fit – Mature Movers, Keep Fit – Seated Exercise

    Jobseeker’s Learning Programmes
    Improving your skills for gaining employment, Adult Learning Service Work Club, Creating and updating your CV, Building up your confidence, interview skills and techniques, presentation skills, job applications

    Languages and Communication
    Arabic, French, German, Greek, Italian, Russian and Spanish. Also includes British Sign Language (BSL)

    Psychology
    Psychology GCSE

    Skills for Life (Foundation)
    Basic Skills, ESOL (English for Speakers of Other Languages), Return to work and learning, Programmes for those with learning difficulties

    Visual and Performing Arts
    Life Drawing, Watercolour Drawing, Painting and Drawing, Pottery, Woodwork, Silversmithing, Embroidery, Textiles, Jewellery, Mixed Crafts, Singing, Guitar, Banjo, Ukulele



    72(t) Calculator #annuity #early #withdrawal #penalty


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    72(t) Calculator

    The Internal Revenue Code section 72(t) and 72(q) can allow for penalty free early withdrawals from retirement accounts under certain circumstances. These sections can allow you to begin receiving money from your retirement accounts before you turn age 59-1/2 generally without the normal 10% premature distribution penalty. Use this calculator to determine your allowable 72(t)/(q) Distribution and how it maybe able to help fund your early retirement. The IRS rules regarding 72(t)/(q) Distributions are complex. Please consult a qualified professional when making decisions about your personal finances. Please note that your financial institution may or may not support all the methods displayed via this calculator.

    Javascript is required for this calculator. If you are using Internet Explorer, you may need to select to ‘Allow Blocked Content’ to view this calculator.

    For more information about these these financial calculators please visit: Dinkytown.net Financial Calculators from KJE Computer Solutions, Inc.

    72(t) Calculator Definitions

    Reasonable interest rate This is any rate less than or equal to 120% of the Federal Mid-Term rate for either of the two months immediately preceding the month in which the distribution begins. Click here for more information. **72TRATE_DEFINITION**

    It is important to note that the associated law that created 72(t) distributions did not define what was to be considered a reasonable interest rate. As such, the guidance from the IRS generally flows from the concept that they will not allow people to circumvent the requirement of substantially equal periodic payments (SEPP) throughout your lifetime by using an unreasonably high interest rate.

    72(t) withdrawals setup prior to January 2003, had some flexibility in the choice of the reasonable rate to use. However, in 2002, the IRS issued new rules stating that only rates less than or equal to 120% of the Federal Mid-Term rate would be considered reasonable. You are now required to use a rate that is less than or equal to 120% of the Federal Mid-Term rate for either of the two months immediately prior to the start of your distribution plan.

    Substantially Equal Periodic Payments (SEPP) The rules for 72(t)/(q) distributions require you to receive Substantially Equal Periodic Payments (SEPP) based on your life expectancy to avoid a 10% premature distribution penalty on any amounts you withdraw. Payments must last for five years (the five-year period does not end until the fifth anniversary of the first distribution received) or until you are 59-1/2, whichever is longer. Further, the SEPP amount must be calculated using one of the IRS approved methods which include:

    • Required minimum distribution method: This is the simplest method for calculating your SEPP, but it also typically produces the lowest payment. It simply takes your current balance and divides it by your single life expectancy or joint life expectancy. Your payment is then recalculated each year with your account balance as of December 31st of the preceding year and your current life expectancy. This is the only method that allows for a payment that will change as your account value changes. Even though this may provide the lowest payment, it may be the best distribution method if you expect wide fluctuations in the value of your account.
  • Fixed amortization method: With this method, the amount to be distributed annually is determined by amortizing your account balance over your single life expectancy, the uniform life expectancy table or joint life expectancy with your oldest named beneficiary.
  • Fixed annuitization method: This method uses an annuity factor to calculate your SEPP. This is one of the most complex methods. The IRS explains it as taking the taxpayer’s account balance divided by an annuity factor equal to the present value of an annuity of $1 per month beginning at the taxpayer’s age attained in the first distribution year and continuing for the life of the taxpayer. For example, if the annuity factor for a $1 per year annuity for an individual who is 50 years old is 19.087 (assuming an interest rate of 3.8% percent), an individual with a $100,000 account balance would receive an annual distribution of $5,239 ($100,000/19.087 = $5,239). This calculator uses the mortality table published in IRS Revenue Ruling 2002-62, which is a non-sex based mortality table. Please note that your annuitized SEPP is based on your life expectancy only, and is not based on the age of your beneficiary.
  • In addition, on July 3rd, 2002, the IRS ruled that you could change your distribution type one-time without penalty from the Annuitized or Amortized methods to the Required Minimum Distribution method. This would allow account holders the option to move from a fixed payment type to a payment that fluctuates annually with the value of their account. The primary reason for this exception is to allow individuals who have suffered large losses, the option to reduce their distribution to prevent their retirement account from being prematurely depleted. For more information on this important exception please see Revenue Ruling 2002-62 on www.treasury.gov.

    If payments are changed for any reason other than death or disability before the required distribution period ends, the distributions may be subject to a retroactive application of the Premature Distribution penalty. It is 10% (plus interest) for all years beginning the year such payments commenced and ending the year of the modification. It is important to remember that while 72(t) distributions are not subject to the 10% penalty for early withdrawal, all applicable taxes on the distributions must still be paid. Further, taking any early distributions from a retirement account reduces the amount of money available later during your retirement. Please contact a qualified professional for more information.

    Account balance The account balance used to determine the payment must be determined in a reasonable manner. For example, with a first distribution taken on July 15, 2013, it would be reasonable to determine the account balance based on the value of the IRA from December 31, 2013 to July 15, 2013. For subsequent years, the same valuation date should be used.

    Your age This is your current age. Use the age you will turn on your birthday for the year you are receiving the distribution.

    Beneficiary age This is your beneficiary’s age. Use the age your beneficiary will turn on their birthday for the year you are receiving the distribution. This entry is ignored if you do not use your Joint Life Expectancy to calculate your SEPP.

    Choose life expectancy tables There are three different life expectancy tables that the IRS allows you to use when calculating your SEPP with the ‘Fixed Amortization’ or the ‘Required Minimum Distribution’ methods. It is important to note that once you have chosen a distribution method and life expectancy table, you cannot change either throughout the course of your distributions. (Except for a one-time change from the Annuitized or Amortized methods to the Life Expectancy method, see SEPP definition for more details). The three life expectancy options are:

    This is a non-sex based table developed by the IRS to simplify minimum distribution requirements. The uniform lifetime table estimates joint survivorship, but does not use your beneficiary’s age to determine the resulting life expectancy. This table can be used by all account owners regardless of marital status or selected beneficiary.

    Single Life Expectancy

    This is a non-sex based life expectancy table. This table does not use your beneficiary’s age to calculate your life expectancy. This table can be used by all account owners regardless of marital status or selected beneficiary. Choosing single life expectancy will produce the highest distribution of the three available life expectancy tables.

    Joint Life Expectancy

    This is also a non-sex based life expectancy table for determining joint survivorship using your oldest named beneficiary.



    Educational Technology #engaging #activities,high #school #(grades: #9-12),language #arts,middle #school #(grades: #6-8),professional #development,high #school,access,common #application,assessment #tools,teacher-parent #relationships,stackup #browser #extension,student #engagement,informal #learning,student #data,teaching #artist #dave #ruch,classroom #technology,virtual #field #trips,streaming #concerts,early #childhood #and #elementary #(grades: #prek-5),music,app #reviews,math #and #science,chemistry #apps,history #and #social #studies,apps,educational #apps,brainpop,school #supplies,curation #tools,online #collaboration #tools,elearning,ipad #apps,education #apps,classroom,ipadsammy,visual #literacy,digital #technology #trends


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    CATEGORY: Educational Technology

    Posted May 2, 2017

    Sure, adolescents spend too much time “glued to their screens,” but why not turn that to your advantage — and theirs? Students love of technology can be a powerful force in language arts classrooms thanks to the possibilities of digital storytelling. Students’ beloved smartphones can be essential tools for sharing their unique thoughts and experiences

    Posted November 14, 2016

    Long gone are the days when high school seniors filled out individual applications online to each of their choice schools — and further gone are handwritten applications mailed out individually with enough time before the deadlines. For the past several years, prospective college students have been able to apply to their choice schools in a

    Posted October 31, 2016

    While PowerPoint remains an industry standard for creating effective and engaging presentations, several new and innovative options enable students and teachers alike to create presentations for in-person and virtual audiences. Presentation options used to be much more limited. Either we needed certain software or a specific computer type, or the cost was prohibitive. That’s all

    Posted September 13, 2016

    Today’s education models tend to focus on a child’s achievement deficits — if students aren’t reading at grade level, for instance, then teachers try to get them caught up. Mindprint Learning flips this model, using cognitive tests to identify children’s strengths and engage them in ways that compensate for their weaknesses. The goal: Let kids

    Posted April 6, 2016

    Stackup is a Chrome browser extension that measures students’ time learning on the Internet. “Teachers use Stackup to make free reading fun and accountable,“ said Nick Garvin, the company’s CEO. Browser extension measures the time students spend learning online by subject or website Students can use the browser extension to research subjects that interest them,

    Posted August 27, 2015

    Early childhood arts-based learning is suffering at many schools. Despite recognizing the benefits of art instruction, teachers have less time for creativity and fun during class time. School budgets for visiting artists are tight as well. Cutbacks appear to be nationwide and beyond. Canadian schools, for instance, are dealing with the same budgetary realities,” said

    Posted September 10, 2014

    Knowing how to calculate volume, area and perimeters isn’t just reserved for mathematicians, physicists and engineers. It’s an important skill that workers use every day in dozens of professions including carpenters, surveyors, landscapers, painters and architects. And it all starts with simple geometry. Geometry has been a part of most middle and high school math

    Posted September 2, 2014

    For generations of chemistry students, the Periodic Table of the Elements has been a must-have tool for solving science homework problems and completing classroom tests. Scientists developed the periodic table in the late 19th century to organize elements, the basic building blocks of ordinary matter, into a cohesive document that can be studied and shared. The

    Posted August 27, 2014

    Now is a great time to be a social studies or government teacher, thanks in part to a multitude of technology resources that can help educators engage students, promote classroom deliberation and develop rich K-12 lesson plans. An excellent example of those resources is the website C-SPAN Classroom, which provides high-quality, up-to-date teaching materials for

    Posted August 18, 2014

    Studying historical facts and figures has been a mainstay in elementary and secondary schools for generations. That’s especially true in government and civics classes, where students learn about the U.S. presidents and their places in history. But memorizing this information can be a monotonous task for some students. Fortunately, technology can help make that job

    Posted August 11, 2014

    One of the best ways to engage students in learning is to include multimedia in lesson plans. Audio, video and interactivity in lessons tend to keep students interested and help them retain the material better. That’s the idea behind the popular BrainPOP collection of educational websites, programs and animated movies. Since 1999, BrainPOP curriculum-based content

    Posted August 6, 2014

    For generations of K-12 students, a paper notebook or three-ring binder was a necessity for classroom organization. But thanks to technology, today’s students can cast aside paper organizers in favor of mobile apps that take classroom organization to a whole new level. Mobile organization apps let students combine lecture notes, study materials and classroom resources

    Posted March 21, 2014

    When Rod Powell’s school went one-to-one, giving a computer to every student, he was thrilled with the opportunity for professional development offered by the North Carolina school district where he teaches history. But he knew he wanted to learn about more than the machine. Powell wanted to know how to bring technology into his students’

    Posted March 6, 2014

    Melissa Techman is a librarian who knows her tech. And she’s willing to share. The Broadus Wood Elementary School’s librarian expands her reach beyond her home district in Virginia. She is on Twitter, Diigo, Symbaloo and Pinterest as mtechman, sharing tech tips and tools for educators. Techman first used technology in her library when she

    Posted December 19, 2013

    With the days of dusty card catalogs long gone, school librarians are taking a leading role in bringing technology into K-12 education. Promoting the importance of technology in education is just one of librarians’ many roles in schools. By serving as role models for technology use and demonstrating how technological resources serve students’ learning aims,

    Posted December 14, 2013

    Some exciting education technology trends appear poised to influence the classroom in new ways. They could give teachers access to a broader range of education options while helping students better prepare for the world they will face. Mobile apps Veteran teachers, new teachers and those training to become teachers are probably all familiar with mobile apps .

    Posted November 1, 2013

    With the costs of education skyrocketing, students can t pass up a chance for a free online textbook. Whatever the subject matter, these textbooks allow teachers to pass the cost savings on to their students and parents. Textbooks can be found for elementary students just beginning their education as well as for college students in specialized

    Posted July 29, 2013

    If you really want to integrate technology into the classroom, asking which apps are best for math or science is the wrong question. “There’s tons of great math apps if you are trying to skill and drill , but there’s more to technology than that,” said Jon Samuelson, best known as iPadSammy from his blog of

    Posted June 5, 2013

    Education is continuously changing, and so are the techniques. The visual literacy classroom is becoming a priority to keep up with digital technology trends in learning. The capacity, comprehension and communication of current students differ considerably from the student of 10 and even five years ago. The classroom environment must adapt to the students learning

    Posted April 29, 2013

    Education technology is at the forefront of discussions about how education will look in the future. Gaming technology and digital badges may play a significant part of that process. While there seems to be a growing reluctance to keep score in youth sports, a new way of tracking wins and losses may just be what’s

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    Early Childhood Education degree: Curtin University #degree #in #early #childhood #education #jobs


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    Early Childhood Education

    Course overview

    Curtin s early childhood education course is an exciting program that provides a well-respected qualification for teaching young children.

    The course aims to develop graduates who are highly regarded for the quality of their preparation and their dedication to the teaching profession. Upon graduating with this degree you will be qualified to teach children from birth to eight years of age.

    You will be able to demonstrate a clear understanding of the integration of educational theory and classroom practice and will be responsive to the changing cultural, social and individual needs of young children and their families.

    The course encompasses child development, the importance of family partnerships and develops a solid knowledge of the curriculum learning areas.

    In this course you will learn the skills, knowledge and experience you need to teach children from birth to eight years in early childhood centres, kindergarten and pre-primary, and junior primary classes to year 3.

    The course encompasses child development, the importance of family partnerships, and develops a sound knowledge of the curriculum learning areas. It will provide you with practical learning experiences in early childhood education settings.

    Core education
    Core studies in this course are: curriculum studies, professional studies, professional experiences in early learning centres and other educational settings, educational psychology, learning technologies, and inclusive education.

    The first year of the course is a common first year with the Bachelor of Education (Primary Education) and includes core studies and interactions with children, educational settings and educators. In the remaining three years, core studies are undertaken concurrently with electives and professional experience.

    The School of Education has served Western Australia s education community through its leadership in teaching, scholarship and research since 1974. We prepare professionals for practice in a wide range of education-related fields and we re known nationally for the quality of our programs, teaching and graduates.

    Electives
    The program includes three elective units which can be used towards an area of personal interest. These can be chosen from the many units available across the University, however the School of Education recommends electives are taken in areas complementary to early childhood education, from areas including health studies, psychology, speech and hearing, and Aboriginal education. Alternatively, you can take electives that contribute to a specialisation such as Educational Technology, Inclusive Education or Catholic Education.

    Teaching practice
    Working with children and educators is central to the early education program. You will work within the early learning sector for varying lengths of time during the program. This culminates in a final 10-week placement, where you will have the major responsibility for a group of children, under supervision of a mentor educator. In addition to this, you are strongly encouraged to link with educators, early learning centres and schools in a voluntary capacity, in order to gain as much valuable experience as possible. There are opportunities for a country practice or an interstate or international internship placement.

    Entry requirements for Australian and New Zealand students

    Commonwealth supported What is a Commonwealth supported place (CSP)? – A CSP is subsidised by the Australian Government. They pay part of the course fees directly to Curtin and then the student pays the remainder. The student can defer this fee to their HECS-HELP loan.

    All Australian students studying an undergraduate degree are automatically awarded a Commonwealth supported place.

    Learn more about CSPs and whether you’re eligible by visiting the Australian Government’s StudyAssist website.

    Fees are indicative first year only.

    *The indicative first-year fee is calculated on 200 credit points, which is the typical full-time study load per year, however some courses require additional study to be completed, in which case the fee will be higher than that shown.

    This fee is a guide only. It may vary depending on the units you choose and do not include incidental fees (such as lab coats or art supplies) or the cost of your textbooks – visit other fees and charges for more information. For more information on fees and to determine your eligibility for HECS-HELP or FEE-HELP, please visit fee basics or the Study Assist website

    If you’re not an Australian citizen, permanent resident or New Zealand citizen, please see information for international students.

    Curtin’s Bachelor of Education is recognised nationally as an initial pre-service teaching qualification.

    If you have previously worked or studied in this field, you are encouraged to contact the Faculty to discuss eligibility for credit for recognised learning (CRL).

    This course can help you become a:

    • Teacher – Early Childhood
    • Child Care Coordinator
    • Childcare Worker
    • Nanny
    • Kindergarten Teacher
    • Pre-Primary Teacher
    • Junior Primary School Teacher
    • Teaching Assistant
    • Education Administrator
    • Policy Development Officer
    • Curtin s education courses were ranked number in the top 100 in the world in the 2016 QS World University Rankings by Subject.
    • Five of our Department of Education staff members have recently received prestigious national teaching awards.
    • You will be immersed in an e-learning environment which complements your studies. You will be encouraged to participate in the learning process and there is a focus on group interaction and continuous assessment.
    • This course integrates education theory with classroom practice for all areas. You will undertake 20 weeks of teaching internship and be offered opportunities for international exchange, internship, Honours, Master and Graduate programs.
    • The Department is proud of its consistently positive feedback from employers who say Curtin teachers are of excellent quality and well prepared for the education industry.

    This course comprises units on teaching strategies, planning lessons, classroom management, learning processes, educational psychology and curriculum studies. You will also complete 20 weeks of teaching practice over the course of your studies, including a 10 week internship where you will have the major responsibility for a class of children under the mentorship of a qualified teacher.



    Colleges with early childhood education programs #colleges #with #early #childhood #education #programs


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    Early Childhood Education

    Overview

    Welcome to Langara College’s Early Childhood Education Diploma Program, where we believe quality child care nurtures early learning.

    This stimulating program balances academic studies on campus and practical experiences in licensed childcare centres. Students develop a strong theoretical foundation for working with children and families and take on increasing responsibility in their practical work. Upon completion of the program they are prepared and able to confidently and competently enter the profession of early childhood education.

    The Early Childhood Education Diploma Program prepares students beginning careers as Early Childhood Educators in a variety of childcare settings (primarily within the province of British Columbia). Langara College also offers an Early Childhood Education: Special Education Post Basic Citation, which is part time and in the evenings. This special needs educator credential program is suited for Early Childhood Educators already holding a diploma or certificate.

    The Early Childhood Education Department at Langara College has been educating Early Childhood Educators since 1966. Langara College has a long history of preparing Early Childhood Educators to work with children from birth to five years of age. The original program has grown from a small six-month program to a double intake three semester diploma program offering high quality instruction.

    Note: The program has two intakes per year. Students may start the diploma program or the post basic citation program in either September or January.



    Early Childhood Programs – The Guidance Center #early #childhood #education #classes #online


    #

    Early Childhood Education

    Our Early Childhood Education programs help nurture the social and emotional development of very young (to age 5) children. We offer:

    • pre-kindergarten class (Mamaroneck, New Rochelle)
    • therapeutic nursery, full and half day (New Rochelle)
    • toddler class for children 18-36 months (OPENING January 2017, New Rochelle)
    • SEIT services for children ages 3-5 years old

    The Creative Learning Center. located in New Rochelle, meets the individual needs of typically developing children as well as those with special needs. Together, they learn, play and thrive! The Creative Learning Center has a full-day preschool class as well as special needs classes and Universal Pre-K. They also offer working-parent friendly hours of 7:30 am to 6:00 pm. We will offer a new toddler class (18-36 months) starting in January 2017! Contact us about enrollment .

    Mamaroneck UPK, located at Central School in the Mamaroneck school district, offers half-day Universal Pre-Kindergarten classes (morning or afternoon) 5 days per week. Our program is a school readiness model for all children who will be eligible for Kindergarten the following year (4 year olds). Children gain skills through our facilitated play and supported social/emotional curriculums, and build a love of learning through interactions with each other, their teachers and their environment.

    To be eligible for the Mamaroneck UPK program for the 2017-2018 school year children must reside in the Mamaroneck Union Free School district, and must turn 4 in the 2017 calendar year. We are currently accepting applications! Follow this link to the school district’s website for registration forms and information. This intake form must also be completed. To learn more, please contact us .

    Foundations in Feelings is an innovative approach for addressing the social-emotional development needs of very young children. Designed to support the social-emotional development of children while working with childcare providers and parents, Foundations in Feelingswas once only available to select daycare centers but is now available to all.

    FREE Programs for Families of Children with autism and developmental delays now take place at our Creative Learning Center two Sundays a month. We have a montly parent-only support group as well as free counseling services for individuals or couples. Funded in part by the Office of People with Developmental Delays.

    For more information on our Early Childhood programs, email us or call 914-613-0700 x7012 .

    Our Programs



    Early Childhood Education (Online) #online #masters #in #early #childhood #education


    #

    Home Early Childhood Education (Online), M.Ed

    Early Childhood Education (Online), M.Ed

    The program is designed for candidates who hold a Professional Level Four Certificate or equivalent in Early Childhood Education. It is an approved program by the Georgia Professional Standards Commission and meets the certificate upgrade requirements mandated by the Professional Standards Commission.This master s program is based upon the concept of developmentally appropriate practices and the value of diverse, intensive field experiences working with diverse student populations.

    It is offered fully online and requires completion of a 36 hour program of study.

    Program Contact Information:

    1. Complete requirements for a Bachelor s degree from a regionally accredited institution.

    2. Possess or be eligible for a Georgia level four certificate in Early Childhood Education, or possess or be eligible for a Georgia Certificate of Eligibility for an Induction Certificate in Early Childhood Education. Candidates who have completed all requirements for the Georgia Certificate of Eligibility have until the end of the first semester to obtain the certificate.

    3. Present a cumulative 2.50 (4.0 scale) grade point average or higher on all undergraduate and graduate work combined.

    4. Present current official report from the Miller Analogies Test (MAT) or the verbal, quantitative and analytical writing sections of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) showing competitive scores.

    5. Submit a personal statement of purpose, not to exceed 200 words, that identifies the applicant s reasons for pursuing graduate study and how admission into the program relates to the applicant s professional aspirations.

    6. Submit a completed Disclosure and Affirmation Form that addresses misconduct disclosure, criminal background check, the Code of Ethics for Educators, and tort liability insurance.

    Applicants may be approved for provisional admission based on the quality of the admission material presented. Provisional students must earn grades of B or higher in their first nine (9) hours of course work after admission and meet any other stipulations outlined by the department to be converted to regular status.



    Early Childhood Education #online #early #childhood #education #programs


    #

    Early Childhood Education

    The focus of the Division of Early Childhood Education and Family Engagement (DECE) is to enhance social, emotional, physical, and academic development of New Jersey’s children — birth through third grade — by providing leadership, resources, and professional development in support of high-quality early childhood programs within a comprehensive, collaborative program.

    • Provide leadership, resources and professional learning opportunities that support high-quality early childhood and early elementary learning programs.
    • Provide guidance and capacity-building for meaningful family engagement in the developmental and learning support for children from birth through third grade.
    1. Develop and align program standards, teaching, learning, and resources anchored to best practice and current research on early childhood development and learning.
    2. Develop guidance, modules and other materials designed to facilitate the implementation of each component of high-quality development and learning programs for children from birth through 3rd grade.
    3. Track, reflect and adjust implementation procedures to improve outcomes.
    4. Build capacity to maximize the relationship with families to promote development and learning in all areas.
    5. Enrich services by expanding and including the voices of diverse stakeholders.
    6. Provide regional and on-site support to strategic staff who facilitate relevant information to local educators.

    NJ Department of Education, Division of Early Childhood Education
    PO Box 500, 100 Riverview Plaza, Trenton, NJ 08625-0500
    telephone: (609) 777-2074, fax:(609) 777-0967



    What do early childhood educators do #what #do #early #childhood #educators #do


    #

    EChO (Early Childhood Organisation Inc) is a group of South Australian educators and carers whose focus is on children from birth to eight years of age.

    EChO is committed to developing the status, high quality and future direction of early childhood education.

    1. Promoting and maintaining the visibility of early childhood education.
    2. Providing quality professional learning for early childhood educators and carers.
    3. Developing and maintaining links with other professional associations.
    4. Promoting and supporting research into children’s cultural, social, moral, physical and emotional development.

    EChO membership is open to all educators and carers – teachers, child care workers, support staff and family day carers.

    How one handles success or failure is determined by their early childhood Harold Ramis

    Become a member today

    Membership of EChO is open to any person whose primary concern is the care and education of young children. We welcome members from child care, family day care, preschools, schools, tertiary education institutions (such as Universities, TAFE) and educational organisations (such as DECD, Catholic Education, Independent Schools Association).

    Membership Options

    • Individual memberships
    • Site memberships


    Encyclopedia Smithsonian: Early Cars: Fact Sheet for Children #car #hire #usa


    #the car people
    #

    Early Cars: Fact Sheet for Children

    Who made the first cars?

    Beginning in the 1770s, many people tried to make cars that would run on steam. Some early steam cars worked well, and some did not. Some were fire pumpers that moved by themselves, and others were small locomotives with road wheels. Beginning in the 1880s, inventors tried very hard to make cars that would run well enough to use every day. These experimental cars ran on steam, gasoline, or electricity. By the 1890s, Europeans were buying and driving cars made by Benz, Daimler, Panhard, and others, and Americans were buying and driving cars made by Duryea, Haynes, Winton, and others. By 1905 gasoline cars were more popular than steam or electric cars because they were easier to use and could travel further without adding fuel. By 1910 gasoline cars became larger and more powerful, and some had folding tops to keep drivers and passengers out of the rain.

    How did the first cars work?

    A steam car burned fuel that heated water in a boiler. This process made steam that expanded and pushed pistons, which turned a crankshaft. An electric car had a battery that powered a small electric motor, which turned a drive shaft. A gasoline car ignited fuel that caused a small explosion inside each cylinder. This explosion pushed the piston and turned a crankshaft connected to the wheels by a chain or drive shaft.

    Who drove the first cars?

    In 1900 wealthy people bought cars for pleasure, comfort, and status. Many doctors bought small, affordable cars because they were more dependable than horses and easier to keep ready. Rural Americans liked cars because they could cover long distances without depending on trains. They carried produce to market, went to stores and movies in town, and even used their cars to plow fields. Families in towns and cities liked cars because they were handy for errands, going to the train station, visiting relatives, going to church, and going on drives in the country. A family s house with a car in the driveway has been a common sight since about 1910. Young people liked cars because they could go to movies, restaurants, and other fun places instead of staying at home with their parents.

    Why do so many people use cars?

    Cars are fast, comfortable, nice looking, and fun to drive. They can go almost anywhere, and they are always ready for use. In many ways, driving is easier than walking, biking, or riding in a train, bus, or airplane. But owning a car is a big responsibility. It takes a lot of money to buy one and keep it running, and drivers must be trained, licensed, and always alert to avoid mistakes and accidents. It takes a lot of space to park cars, and too many cars cause congestion on roads and in parking lots. Some car owners have returned to walking, biking, or riding a train or bus when it s more practical or convenient. For most Americans, cars are a favorite way to travel, but there will always be a need for other types of transportation.

    What was different about the Ford Model T?

    Ford Model T

    Built near the end of the Model-T era, this Model-T roadster came off the assembly line in 1926. Courtesy of the National Museum of American History.

    The Ford Model T, made between 1908 and 1927, cost less than other cars, but it was sturdy and practical. It ran well on dirt roads and fields because it could twist as it rolled over bumps. The Model T looked like an expensive car but actually was very simply equipped. From 1915 to 1925, it only came in black because black paint dried faster than other colors, making it possible to build and sell more Model Ts. For all of these reasons, more Model Ts were sold than any other type of car at the time — a total of just over 15 million. Farmers, factory workers, school teachers, and many other Americans changed from horses or trains to cars when they bought Model Ts.

    Why do most cars today run on gasoline?

    The gasoline engine has been reliable, practical, and fairly efficient since about 1900. It is easier to control than a steam engine and less likely to burn or explode. A gasoline car can go much further on a tank of gasoline than an electric car can go between battery charges. Gasoline engines have been improved by the use of computers, fuel injectors, and other devices. But growing concern about chemicals that gasoline engines release into the air (i.e. pollution) have led to new interest in clean, electric cars and cars that run on natural gas, a vapor that is different from gasoline.

    How many cars are in the Smithsonian?

    There are more than 60 cars in the Smithsonian collection, but only 12 to 15 are displayed in the National Museum of American History. Some cars are in storage, and some are on loan to other museums. The production years of cars in the collection range from 1894 to 1990. There are experimental cars, cars that families drove, and racing cars. The Smithsonian has been collecting cars since 1899, and almost all of them have been given by people or businesses.

    Where else can I see early cars?

    Some of the Smithsonian s cars are on loan to the Western Reserve Historical Society in Cleveland, Ohio, the Onondaga Historical Association in Syracuse, New York, the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame in Indianapolis, Indiana, and the Eastern Museum of Motor Racing in York Springs, Pennsylvania. Major car museums not connected with the Smithsonian include the Henry Ford Museum in Dearborn, Michigan, the National Automobile Museum in Reno, Nevada, the Imperial Palace Collection in Las Vegas, Nevada and Biloxi, Mississippi, the Petersen Automotive Museum in Los Angeles, California, the Auburn-Cord-Duesenberg Museum in Auburn, Indiana, and the Owl s Head Museum in Owl s Head, Maine.

    Where can I read about early cars?

    Books about early cars are available at most libraries. Some of the books you might look for are:

    Automobile Quarterly. The American Car Since 1775. New York: L.S. Bailey, 1971.

    Clymer, Floyd. Henry’s Wonderful Model T 1908-1927. New York: McGraw-Hill, 1955.

    Dammann, George H. Ninety Years of Ford. Osceola, WI, USA: Motorbooks International, 1993.

    Editors of Consumer Guide Staff. Ford: The Complete History. Lincolnwood, IL: Publications International, 1989.

    Flink, James J. America Adopts the Automobile, 1895-1910. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 1970.

    _____. The Automobile Age. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 1990.

    Heilig, John, ed. Automobile Quarterly’s Directory of North American Automobile Museums. Kutztown, PA: Automobile Quarterly, 1992.

    Lichty, Robert C. Standard Catalog of Ford, 1903-1990. Iola, WI: Krause Publications, 1990.

    Montagu of Beaulieu, Lord and Anthony Bird. Steam Cars 1770-1970. London: Cassell, 1971.

    May, George S. ed. The Automobile Industry, 1885-1920. New York: Facts on File, 1989.

    McCalley, Bruce W. Model T Ford: The Car That Changed the World. Iola, WI: Krause Publications, 1994.

    _____. The Model T Ford Encyclopedia, 1909-1927: A Comprehensive Guide to the Evolution and Changes of the Major Components of the Model T Ford. [Burbank, CA: Model T Ford Club of America], c. 1989.

    Rae, John Bell. The American Automobile Industry. Boston: Twayne Publishers, 1984.

    _____. American Automobile Manufacturers: The First Forty Years. Philadelphia, PA: Chilton, 1959.

    Schiffer, Michael B. Tamara C. Butts and Kimberly K. Grimm. Taking Charge: The Electric Automobile in America. Washington: Smithsonian Institution Press, 1994.

    Sears, Stephen W. The American Heritage History of the Automobile in America. New York: American Heritage Publishing, Co. 1977.

    Stern, Philip Van Doren. Tin Lizzie: The Story of the Fabulous Model T Ford. New York: Simon and Schuster, 1955.

    Wakefield, Ernest Henry. History of the Electric Automobile: Battery-only Powered Cars. Warrendale, PA: Society of Automotive Engineers, 1994.

    Wilson, Paul Carroll. Chrome Dreams: Automobile Styling Since 1893. Radnor, PA: Chilton-Book Co. 1976.

    Where can I find out about cars on the Web?

    A Brief History of The First 100 Years of the Automobile Industry in the United States: www.theautochannel.com/mania/industry.orig/history

    Car Museums on the Web.

    Henry Ford Museum Greenfield Village: www.thehenryford.org

    Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum: www.indianapolismotorspeedway.com/museum

    National Automobile Museum. www.automuseum.org

    Petersen Automotive Museum: www.petersen.org



    Encyclopedia Smithsonian: Early Cars: Fact Sheet for Children #cheap #car #audio


    #the car people
    #

    Early Cars: Fact Sheet for Children

    Who made the first cars?

    Beginning in the 1770s, many people tried to make cars that would run on steam. Some early steam cars worked well, and some did not. Some were fire pumpers that moved by themselves, and others were small locomotives with road wheels. Beginning in the 1880s, inventors tried very hard to make cars that would run well enough to use every day. These experimental cars ran on steam, gasoline, or electricity. By the 1890s, Europeans were buying and driving cars made by Benz, Daimler, Panhard, and others, and Americans were buying and driving cars made by Duryea, Haynes, Winton, and others. By 1905 gasoline cars were more popular than steam or electric cars because they were easier to use and could travel further without adding fuel. By 1910 gasoline cars became larger and more powerful, and some had folding tops to keep drivers and passengers out of the rain.

    How did the first cars work?

    A steam car burned fuel that heated water in a boiler. This process made steam that expanded and pushed pistons, which turned a crankshaft. An electric car had a battery that powered a small electric motor, which turned a drive shaft. A gasoline car ignited fuel that caused a small explosion inside each cylinder. This explosion pushed the piston and turned a crankshaft connected to the wheels by a chain or drive shaft.

    Who drove the first cars?

    In 1900 wealthy people bought cars for pleasure, comfort, and status. Many doctors bought small, affordable cars because they were more dependable than horses and easier to keep ready. Rural Americans liked cars because they could cover long distances without depending on trains. They carried produce to market, went to stores and movies in town, and even used their cars to plow fields. Families in towns and cities liked cars because they were handy for errands, going to the train station, visiting relatives, going to church, and going on drives in the country. A family s house with a car in the driveway has been a common sight since about 1910. Young people liked cars because they could go to movies, restaurants, and other fun places instead of staying at home with their parents.

    Why do so many people use cars?

    Cars are fast, comfortable, nice looking, and fun to drive. They can go almost anywhere, and they are always ready for use. In many ways, driving is easier than walking, biking, or riding in a train, bus, or airplane. But owning a car is a big responsibility. It takes a lot of money to buy one and keep it running, and drivers must be trained, licensed, and always alert to avoid mistakes and accidents. It takes a lot of space to park cars, and too many cars cause congestion on roads and in parking lots. Some car owners have returned to walking, biking, or riding a train or bus when it s more practical or convenient. For most Americans, cars are a favorite way to travel, but there will always be a need for other types of transportation.

    What was different about the Ford Model T?

    Ford Model T

    Built near the end of the Model-T era, this Model-T roadster came off the assembly line in 1926. Courtesy of the National Museum of American History.

    The Ford Model T, made between 1908 and 1927, cost less than other cars, but it was sturdy and practical. It ran well on dirt roads and fields because it could twist as it rolled over bumps. The Model T looked like an expensive car but actually was very simply equipped. From 1915 to 1925, it only came in black because black paint dried faster than other colors, making it possible to build and sell more Model Ts. For all of these reasons, more Model Ts were sold than any other type of car at the time — a total of just over 15 million. Farmers, factory workers, school teachers, and many other Americans changed from horses or trains to cars when they bought Model Ts.

    Why do most cars today run on gasoline?

    The gasoline engine has been reliable, practical, and fairly efficient since about 1900. It is easier to control than a steam engine and less likely to burn or explode. A gasoline car can go much further on a tank of gasoline than an electric car can go between battery charges. Gasoline engines have been improved by the use of computers, fuel injectors, and other devices. But growing concern about chemicals that gasoline engines release into the air (i.e. pollution) have led to new interest in clean, electric cars and cars that run on natural gas, a vapor that is different from gasoline.

    How many cars are in the Smithsonian?

    There are more than 60 cars in the Smithsonian collection, but only 12 to 15 are displayed in the National Museum of American History. Some cars are in storage, and some are on loan to other museums. The production years of cars in the collection range from 1894 to 1990. There are experimental cars, cars that families drove, and racing cars. The Smithsonian has been collecting cars since 1899, and almost all of them have been given by people or businesses.

    Where else can I see early cars?

    Some of the Smithsonian s cars are on loan to the Western Reserve Historical Society in Cleveland, Ohio, the Onondaga Historical Association in Syracuse, New York, the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame in Indianapolis, Indiana, and the Eastern Museum of Motor Racing in York Springs, Pennsylvania. Major car museums not connected with the Smithsonian include the Henry Ford Museum in Dearborn, Michigan, the National Automobile Museum in Reno, Nevada, the Imperial Palace Collection in Las Vegas, Nevada and Biloxi, Mississippi, the Petersen Automotive Museum in Los Angeles, California, the Auburn-Cord-Duesenberg Museum in Auburn, Indiana, and the Owl s Head Museum in Owl s Head, Maine.

    Where can I read about early cars?

    Books about early cars are available at most libraries. Some of the books you might look for are:

    Automobile Quarterly. The American Car Since 1775. New York: L.S. Bailey, 1971.

    Clymer, Floyd. Henry’s Wonderful Model T 1908-1927. New York: McGraw-Hill, 1955.

    Dammann, George H. Ninety Years of Ford. Osceola, WI, USA: Motorbooks International, 1993.

    Editors of Consumer Guide Staff. Ford: The Complete History. Lincolnwood, IL: Publications International, 1989.

    Flink, James J. America Adopts the Automobile, 1895-1910. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 1970.

    _____. The Automobile Age. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 1990.

    Heilig, John, ed. Automobile Quarterly’s Directory of North American Automobile Museums. Kutztown, PA: Automobile Quarterly, 1992.

    Lichty, Robert C. Standard Catalog of Ford, 1903-1990. Iola, WI: Krause Publications, 1990.

    Montagu of Beaulieu, Lord and Anthony Bird. Steam Cars 1770-1970. London: Cassell, 1971.

    May, George S. ed. The Automobile Industry, 1885-1920. New York: Facts on File, 1989.

    McCalley, Bruce W. Model T Ford: The Car That Changed the World. Iola, WI: Krause Publications, 1994.

    _____. The Model T Ford Encyclopedia, 1909-1927: A Comprehensive Guide to the Evolution and Changes of the Major Components of the Model T Ford. [Burbank, CA: Model T Ford Club of America], c. 1989.

    Rae, John Bell. The American Automobile Industry. Boston: Twayne Publishers, 1984.

    _____. American Automobile Manufacturers: The First Forty Years. Philadelphia, PA: Chilton, 1959.

    Schiffer, Michael B. Tamara C. Butts and Kimberly K. Grimm. Taking Charge: The Electric Automobile in America. Washington: Smithsonian Institution Press, 1994.

    Sears, Stephen W. The American Heritage History of the Automobile in America. New York: American Heritage Publishing, Co. 1977.

    Stern, Philip Van Doren. Tin Lizzie: The Story of the Fabulous Model T Ford. New York: Simon and Schuster, 1955.

    Wakefield, Ernest Henry. History of the Electric Automobile: Battery-only Powered Cars. Warrendale, PA: Society of Automotive Engineers, 1994.

    Wilson, Paul Carroll. Chrome Dreams: Automobile Styling Since 1893. Radnor, PA: Chilton-Book Co. 1976.

    Where can I find out about cars on the Web?

    A Brief History of The First 100 Years of the Automobile Industry in the United States: www.theautochannel.com/mania/industry.orig/history

    Car Museums on the Web.

    Henry Ford Museum Greenfield Village: www.thehenryford.org

    Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum: www.indianapolismotorspeedway.com/museum

    National Automobile Museum. www.automuseum.org

    Petersen Automotive Museum: www.petersen.org



    Early Auto Loan Payoff Calculator #discount #auto #insurance


    #auto loan payoff calculator
    #

    Early Auto Loan Payoff Calculator

    The other day I got an email from a reader looking for some sort financial spreadsheet that would help her calculate how early she would be able to pay off her auto loan

    Hello! I have been reading ChristianPF articles for a few months now and have found so much useful information in the archives! I am currently searching for an Excel spreadsheet for a loan payment schedule. I have found many that deal with the debt snowball approach, but have not been able to find one which takes into account both the monthly payment on the loan and additional payments made each month. My husband and I are wanting to pay our auto loan off early and would like a way to project the payoff time line with additional payments. Due to income fluctuations, the amount of additional payments we could make each month would vary. Would you happen to know where we could find such a spreadsheet?

    I don t know of a spreadsheet that would handle that for her (if you do, or can create one please let me know!), but I do know of an early auto loan payoff calculator over at Bankrate that be close to what she is looking for.

    It would handle everything except the variable additional payments each month. Until some Excel whiz comes up with a spreadsheet to do that, I think the best bet would just to take a best-guess average of the anticipated additional payment each month and use that figure.

    Do you have any other calculators or spreadsheets that would help her?



    Early Loan Payoff Calculator to Calculate Extra Payment Savings #certified #used #cars


    #auto loan payoff calculator
    #

    Introduction

    What the calculator does.

    This early loan payoff calculator will help you to quickly calculate the time and interest savings (the “pay off”) you will reap by adding extra payments to your existing monthly payment.

    The calculator also includes an optional amortization schedule based on the new monthly payment amount, which also has a printer friendly report that you can print out and use to track your loan balance.

    If you want some incentive for adding payoff amounts to your existing loan payments, picture yourself having the choice between handing an amount of cash over to an already-wealthy creditor, versus providing a genuine need for a loved one.

    Your family needs your money a lot more than your creditors do, so I urge to stop helping creditors to become richer at the expense of your family’s financial well-being. Take a stand for your family — instead of for your creditors — by working hard to pay off your loans ahead of schedule. That way you can use the interest savings for more meaningful purposes than just helping the rich get richer.

    With that I invite you to use the Early Loan Payoff Calculator to see just how much money you can divert from a creditor back into your own pocket.



    Auto Loan Early Payoff #auto #anything


    #auto loan payoff calculator
    #

    Definitions

    Annual interest rate Annual interest rate. Maximum interest rate is 20%.

    Loan length (months) Total length, or term, of your original auto loan in months.

    Original loan amount The original amount financed with your auto loan, not to be confused with the remaining balance or principal balance.

    Additional monthly payment Your proposed extra payment per month. This payment will be used to reduce your principal balance.

    Monthly scheduled payment Monthly principal and interest payment based on your original loan amount, term and interest rate.

    Monthly accelerated payment Scheduled payment plus additional monthly payment.

    Total savings Total amount you would save in interest if you made the accelerated payment until your loan was paid in full.

    Information and interactive calculators are made available to you as self-help tools for your independent use and are not intended to provide investment advice. We cannot and do not guarantee their applicability or accuracy in regards to your individual circumstances. All examples are hypothetical and are for illustrative purposes. We encourage you to seek personalized advice from qualified professionals regarding all personal finance issues.



    Encyclopedia Smithsonian: Early Cars: Fact Sheet for Children #lpg #cars #for #sale


    #the car people
    #

    Early Cars: Fact Sheet for Children

    Who made the first cars?

    Beginning in the 1770s, many people tried to make cars that would run on steam. Some early steam cars worked well, and some did not. Some were fire pumpers that moved by themselves, and others were small locomotives with road wheels. Beginning in the 1880s, inventors tried very hard to make cars that would run well enough to use every day. These experimental cars ran on steam, gasoline, or electricity. By the 1890s, Europeans were buying and driving cars made by Benz, Daimler, Panhard, and others, and Americans were buying and driving cars made by Duryea, Haynes, Winton, and others. By 1905 gasoline cars were more popular than steam or electric cars because they were easier to use and could travel further without adding fuel. By 1910 gasoline cars became larger and more powerful, and some had folding tops to keep drivers and passengers out of the rain.

    How did the first cars work?

    A steam car burned fuel that heated water in a boiler. This process made steam that expanded and pushed pistons, which turned a crankshaft. An electric car had a battery that powered a small electric motor, which turned a drive shaft. A gasoline car ignited fuel that caused a small explosion inside each cylinder. This explosion pushed the piston and turned a crankshaft connected to the wheels by a chain or drive shaft.

    Who drove the first cars?

    In 1900 wealthy people bought cars for pleasure, comfort, and status. Many doctors bought small, affordable cars because they were more dependable than horses and easier to keep ready. Rural Americans liked cars because they could cover long distances without depending on trains. They carried produce to market, went to stores and movies in town, and even used their cars to plow fields. Families in towns and cities liked cars because they were handy for errands, going to the train station, visiting relatives, going to church, and going on drives in the country. A family s house with a car in the driveway has been a common sight since about 1910. Young people liked cars because they could go to movies, restaurants, and other fun places instead of staying at home with their parents.

    Why do so many people use cars?

    Cars are fast, comfortable, nice looking, and fun to drive. They can go almost anywhere, and they are always ready for use. In many ways, driving is easier than walking, biking, or riding in a train, bus, or airplane. But owning a car is a big responsibility. It takes a lot of money to buy one and keep it running, and drivers must be trained, licensed, and always alert to avoid mistakes and accidents. It takes a lot of space to park cars, and too many cars cause congestion on roads and in parking lots. Some car owners have returned to walking, biking, or riding a train or bus when it s more practical or convenient. For most Americans, cars are a favorite way to travel, but there will always be a need for other types of transportation.

    What was different about the Ford Model T?

    Ford Model T

    Built near the end of the Model-T era, this Model-T roadster came off the assembly line in 1926. Courtesy of the National Museum of American History.

    The Ford Model T, made between 1908 and 1927, cost less than other cars, but it was sturdy and practical. It ran well on dirt roads and fields because it could twist as it rolled over bumps. The Model T looked like an expensive car but actually was very simply equipped. From 1915 to 1925, it only came in black because black paint dried faster than other colors, making it possible to build and sell more Model Ts. For all of these reasons, more Model Ts were sold than any other type of car at the time — a total of just over 15 million. Farmers, factory workers, school teachers, and many other Americans changed from horses or trains to cars when they bought Model Ts.

    Why do most cars today run on gasoline?

    The gasoline engine has been reliable, practical, and fairly efficient since about 1900. It is easier to control than a steam engine and less likely to burn or explode. A gasoline car can go much further on a tank of gasoline than an electric car can go between battery charges. Gasoline engines have been improved by the use of computers, fuel injectors, and other devices. But growing concern about chemicals that gasoline engines release into the air (i.e. pollution) have led to new interest in clean, electric cars and cars that run on natural gas, a vapor that is different from gasoline.

    How many cars are in the Smithsonian?

    There are more than 60 cars in the Smithsonian collection, but only 12 to 15 are displayed in the National Museum of American History. Some cars are in storage, and some are on loan to other museums. The production years of cars in the collection range from 1894 to 1990. There are experimental cars, cars that families drove, and racing cars. The Smithsonian has been collecting cars since 1899, and almost all of them have been given by people or businesses.

    Where else can I see early cars?

    Some of the Smithsonian s cars are on loan to the Western Reserve Historical Society in Cleveland, Ohio, the Onondaga Historical Association in Syracuse, New York, the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame in Indianapolis, Indiana, and the Eastern Museum of Motor Racing in York Springs, Pennsylvania. Major car museums not connected with the Smithsonian include the Henry Ford Museum in Dearborn, Michigan, the National Automobile Museum in Reno, Nevada, the Imperial Palace Collection in Las Vegas, Nevada and Biloxi, Mississippi, the Petersen Automotive Museum in Los Angeles, California, the Auburn-Cord-Duesenberg Museum in Auburn, Indiana, and the Owl s Head Museum in Owl s Head, Maine.

    Where can I read about early cars?

    Books about early cars are available at most libraries. Some of the books you might look for are:

    Automobile Quarterly. The American Car Since 1775. New York: L.S. Bailey, 1971.

    Clymer, Floyd. Henry’s Wonderful Model T 1908-1927. New York: McGraw-Hill, 1955.

    Dammann, George H. Ninety Years of Ford. Osceola, WI, USA: Motorbooks International, 1993.

    Editors of Consumer Guide Staff. Ford: The Complete History. Lincolnwood, IL: Publications International, 1989.

    Flink, James J. America Adopts the Automobile, 1895-1910. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 1970.

    _____. The Automobile Age. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 1990.

    Heilig, John, ed. Automobile Quarterly’s Directory of North American Automobile Museums. Kutztown, PA: Automobile Quarterly, 1992.

    Lichty, Robert C. Standard Catalog of Ford, 1903-1990. Iola, WI: Krause Publications, 1990.

    Montagu of Beaulieu, Lord and Anthony Bird. Steam Cars 1770-1970. London: Cassell, 1971.

    May, George S. ed. The Automobile Industry, 1885-1920. New York: Facts on File, 1989.

    McCalley, Bruce W. Model T Ford: The Car That Changed the World. Iola, WI: Krause Publications, 1994.

    _____. The Model T Ford Encyclopedia, 1909-1927: A Comprehensive Guide to the Evolution and Changes of the Major Components of the Model T Ford. [Burbank, CA: Model T Ford Club of America], c. 1989.

    Rae, John Bell. The American Automobile Industry. Boston: Twayne Publishers, 1984.

    _____. American Automobile Manufacturers: The First Forty Years. Philadelphia, PA: Chilton, 1959.

    Schiffer, Michael B. Tamara C. Butts and Kimberly K. Grimm. Taking Charge: The Electric Automobile in America. Washington: Smithsonian Institution Press, 1994.

    Sears, Stephen W. The American Heritage History of the Automobile in America. New York: American Heritage Publishing, Co. 1977.

    Stern, Philip Van Doren. Tin Lizzie: The Story of the Fabulous Model T Ford. New York: Simon and Schuster, 1955.

    Wakefield, Ernest Henry. History of the Electric Automobile: Battery-only Powered Cars. Warrendale, PA: Society of Automotive Engineers, 1994.

    Wilson, Paul Carroll. Chrome Dreams: Automobile Styling Since 1893. Radnor, PA: Chilton-Book Co. 1976.

    Where can I find out about cars on the Web?

    A Brief History of The First 100 Years of the Automobile Industry in the United States: www.theautochannel.com/mania/industry.orig/history

    Car Museums on the Web.

    Henry Ford Museum Greenfield Village: www.thehenryford.org

    Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum: www.indianapolismotorspeedway.com/museum

    National Automobile Museum. www.automuseum.org

    Petersen Automotive Museum: www.petersen.org



    Encyclopedia Smithsonian: Early Cars: Fact Sheet for Children


    #the car people
    #

    Early Cars: Fact Sheet for Children

    Who made the first cars?

    Beginning in the 1770s, many people tried to make cars that would run on steam. Some early steam cars worked well, and some did not. Some were fire pumpers that moved by themselves, and others were small locomotives with road wheels. Beginning in the 1880s, inventors tried very hard to make cars that would run well enough to use every day. These experimental cars ran on steam, gasoline, or electricity. By the 1890s, Europeans were buying and driving cars made by Benz, Daimler, Panhard, and others, and Americans were buying and driving cars made by Duryea, Haynes, Winton, and others. By 1905 gasoline cars were more popular than steam or electric cars because they were easier to use and could travel further without adding fuel. By 1910 gasoline cars became larger and more powerful, and some had folding tops to keep drivers and passengers out of the rain.

    How did the first cars work?

    A steam car burned fuel that heated water in a boiler. This process made steam that expanded and pushed pistons, which turned a crankshaft. An electric car had a battery that powered a small electric motor, which turned a drive shaft. A gasoline car ignited fuel that caused a small explosion inside each cylinder. This explosion pushed the piston and turned a crankshaft connected to the wheels by a chain or drive shaft.

    Who drove the first cars?

    In 1900 wealthy people bought cars for pleasure, comfort, and status. Many doctors bought small, affordable cars because they were more dependable than horses and easier to keep ready. Rural Americans liked cars because they could cover long distances without depending on trains. They carried produce to market, went to stores and movies in town, and even used their cars to plow fields. Families in towns and cities liked cars because they were handy for errands, going to the train station, visiting relatives, going to church, and going on drives in the country. A family s house with a car in the driveway has been a common sight since about 1910. Young people liked cars because they could go to movies, restaurants, and other fun places instead of staying at home with their parents.

    Why do so many people use cars?

    Cars are fast, comfortable, nice looking, and fun to drive. They can go almost anywhere, and they are always ready for use. In many ways, driving is easier than walking, biking, or riding in a train, bus, or airplane. But owning a car is a big responsibility. It takes a lot of money to buy one and keep it running, and drivers must be trained, licensed, and always alert to avoid mistakes and accidents. It takes a lot of space to park cars, and too many cars cause congestion on roads and in parking lots. Some car owners have returned to walking, biking, or riding a train or bus when it s more practical or convenient. For most Americans, cars are a favorite way to travel, but there will always be a need for other types of transportation.

    What was different about the Ford Model T?

    Ford Model T

    Built near the end of the Model-T era, this Model-T roadster came off the assembly line in 1926. Courtesy of the National Museum of American History.

    The Ford Model T, made between 1908 and 1927, cost less than other cars, but it was sturdy and practical. It ran well on dirt roads and fields because it could twist as it rolled over bumps. The Model T looked like an expensive car but actually was very simply equipped. From 1915 to 1925, it only came in black because black paint dried faster than other colors, making it possible to build and sell more Model Ts. For all of these reasons, more Model Ts were sold than any other type of car at the time — a total of just over 15 million. Farmers, factory workers, school teachers, and many other Americans changed from horses or trains to cars when they bought Model Ts.

    Why do most cars today run on gasoline?

    The gasoline engine has been reliable, practical, and fairly efficient since about 1900. It is easier to control than a steam engine and less likely to burn or explode. A gasoline car can go much further on a tank of gasoline than an electric car can go between battery charges. Gasoline engines have been improved by the use of computers, fuel injectors, and other devices. But growing concern about chemicals that gasoline engines release into the air (i.e. pollution) have led to new interest in clean, electric cars and cars that run on natural gas, a vapor that is different from gasoline.

    How many cars are in the Smithsonian?

    There are more than 60 cars in the Smithsonian collection, but only 12 to 15 are displayed in the National Museum of American History. Some cars are in storage, and some are on loan to other museums. The production years of cars in the collection range from 1894 to 1990. There are experimental cars, cars that families drove, and racing cars. The Smithsonian has been collecting cars since 1899, and almost all of them have been given by people or businesses.

    Where else can I see early cars?

    Some of the Smithsonian s cars are on loan to the Western Reserve Historical Society in Cleveland, Ohio, the Onondaga Historical Association in Syracuse, New York, the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame in Indianapolis, Indiana, and the Eastern Museum of Motor Racing in York Springs, Pennsylvania. Major car museums not connected with the Smithsonian include the Henry Ford Museum in Dearborn, Michigan, the National Automobile Museum in Reno, Nevada, the Imperial Palace Collection in Las Vegas, Nevada and Biloxi, Mississippi, the Petersen Automotive Museum in Los Angeles, California, the Auburn-Cord-Duesenberg Museum in Auburn, Indiana, and the Owl s Head Museum in Owl s Head, Maine.

    Where can I read about early cars?

    Books about early cars are available at most libraries. Some of the books you might look for are:

    Automobile Quarterly. The American Car Since 1775. New York: L.S. Bailey, 1971.

    Clymer, Floyd. Henry’s Wonderful Model T 1908-1927. New York: McGraw-Hill, 1955.

    Dammann, George H. Ninety Years of Ford. Osceola, WI, USA: Motorbooks International, 1993.

    Editors of Consumer Guide Staff. Ford: The Complete History. Lincolnwood, IL: Publications International, 1989.

    Flink, James J. America Adopts the Automobile, 1895-1910. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 1970.

    _____. The Automobile Age. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 1990.

    Heilig, John, ed. Automobile Quarterly’s Directory of North American Automobile Museums. Kutztown, PA: Automobile Quarterly, 1992.

    Lichty, Robert C. Standard Catalog of Ford, 1903-1990. Iola, WI: Krause Publications, 1990.

    Montagu of Beaulieu, Lord and Anthony Bird. Steam Cars 1770-1970. London: Cassell, 1971.

    May, George S. ed. The Automobile Industry, 1885-1920. New York: Facts on File, 1989.

    McCalley, Bruce W. Model T Ford: The Car That Changed the World. Iola, WI: Krause Publications, 1994.

    _____. The Model T Ford Encyclopedia, 1909-1927: A Comprehensive Guide to the Evolution and Changes of the Major Components of the Model T Ford. [Burbank, CA: Model T Ford Club of America], c. 1989.

    Rae, John Bell. The American Automobile Industry. Boston: Twayne Publishers, 1984.

    _____. American Automobile Manufacturers: The First Forty Years. Philadelphia, PA: Chilton, 1959.

    Schiffer, Michael B. Tamara C. Butts and Kimberly K. Grimm. Taking Charge: The Electric Automobile in America. Washington: Smithsonian Institution Press, 1994.

    Sears, Stephen W. The American Heritage History of the Automobile in America. New York: American Heritage Publishing, Co. 1977.

    Stern, Philip Van Doren. Tin Lizzie: The Story of the Fabulous Model T Ford. New York: Simon and Schuster, 1955.

    Wakefield, Ernest Henry. History of the Electric Automobile: Battery-only Powered Cars. Warrendale, PA: Society of Automotive Engineers, 1994.

    Wilson, Paul Carroll. Chrome Dreams: Automobile Styling Since 1893. Radnor, PA: Chilton-Book Co. 1976.

    Where can I find out about cars on the Web?

    A Brief History of The First 100 Years of the Automobile Industry in the United States: www.theautochannel.com/mania/industry.orig/history

    Car Museums on the Web.

    Henry Ford Museum Greenfield Village: www.thehenryford.org

    Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum: www.indianapolismotorspeedway.com/museum

    National Automobile Museum. www.automuseum.org

    Petersen Automotive Museum: www.petersen.org



    Early Ford V-8 Club


    #v cars
    #

    Welcome to the Early Ford V-8 Club of America

    An International Organization

    Founded in San Leandro, California in 1963, our club recognizes all Ford Motor Company vehicles made between 1932 and 1953, including Ford, Lincoln, Mercury, commercial vehicles, tractors and other Ford powered vehicles built around the world utilizing the 4, 6, 8, and 12 cylinder engines produced by Ford Motor Company.

    Today, as the Marquee Club of our represented vehicles, with membership of over 9,000 and 125 Regional Groups worldwide, we are dedicated to the restoration and preservation of all Ford Motor Company vehicles built between 1932 and 1953.

    The club’s award-winning, bi-monthly magazine, the V-8 Times, is circulated all over the world and is acclaimed as one of the best car club magazines anywhere. The V-8 Times features technical articles, shop tips, questions and answers by our panel of experts, nostalgia, club and regional group news, offerings of accessories and restoration manuals found nowhere else – plus classified ads for cars and parts.

    If you’re not already a member, we invite you to Join Today and explore the works of the Early Ford V-8 Club of America.