Jeep tops Consumer Reports list of worst car values #car #hire #usa


#value car
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Jeep tops Consumer Reports list of worst car values

When it comes to overall value, one of America’s most iconic vehicles – the very symbol of rugged individualism – should be avoided by any wise car buyer, says Consumer Reports magazine.

It’s the Jeep Wrangler Unlimited, which Consumer Reports says is the worst car value among any model. It leads a worst-value list that includes a wide range of models by category – from the hapless Fiat 500C among subcompacts to the hulking Mercedes-Benz GL350 BlueTec for luxury large SUVs.

Jeep

Jeep Wrangler Unlimited was named the worst value overall by Consumer Reports.

Jeep Wrangler Unlimited was named the worst value overall by Consumer Reports. less

The Jeep, however, is among the nation’s most beloved vehicles, especially by its owners. Nevertheless, Consumer Reports calls it “hard-riding, ponderous, uncomfortable, and unreliable.” It costs 77 cents a mile to operate, compared with 52 cents for the top-rated Toyota Camry Hybrid.

The value index rates cars based on road tests, predicted reliability and five-year ownership costs.


10 best cars: Consumer Reports – Best overall: Lexus 460L (1).


#best cars 2010
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The influential magazine names the cars, trucks and SUVs it rates highest in popular categories.

Price: $70,925

Mileage: 24 Hwy, 16 City

Parent company Toyota has been taking its lumps lately, but the carmaker and its luxury division Lexus still makes some very good vehicles. Case in point: the Lexus LS full-size luxury sedan scores a near-flawless 99 on Consumer Reports 100-point scale.

Toyota’s recall mess has caused some problems, though. Toyota would have had four cars in this Top 10 list instead of just two. Two vehicles — the Rav4 and Highlander SUVs — have had their recommendations suspended as a result of recalls that resulted in “stop sale” orders by the carmaker.

Best over.

Family car

Small car

Sporty car

Small SUV

Family SUV

Green car

Sports se.

Family ha.

Last updated March 02 2010: 4:40 PM ET


New Used Car Reviews Ratings Consumer Reports: All About Cars: Reviews, Comparisons, Tests, and Model


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new used car reviews ratings consumer reports

new used car reviews ratings consumer reports

The Owner’s Manual for New Car Shopping Road tests, reliability, owner satisfaction moreFind the best new cars and used cars at Consumer Reports, with reviews and ratings based on our expert and unbiased testing.Research new and used cars including car prices, view incentives and dealer inventory listings, compare vehicles, get car buying advice and reviews at Edmunds.comRead car reviews and ratings for new and used vehicles, from New Zealand motorists and independent AA experts. Add your car review today!Car Reviews Autobytel.com Delivers In-Depth Car Reviews and Ratings through Various Factors Including as: Price, Safety, Fuel Economy, and Comfort. Browse our Auto Edmunds rates new cars on a number of criteria including performance, comfort, interior, and value. View all of our newest car ratings here!Check KBB car price values when buying and selling new or used vehicles. Recognized by consumers and the automotive industry since 1926.Includes cars for sale, buying guides, reviews, pictures, and videos.Looking for the best price on a new or used car? Research new cars and find used cars for sale. Get the facts from the auto pros at InternetAutoGuide.com.Get the inside scoop on new cars: car reviews, car photos, test drive results, technical specs and more. Comprehensive car reviews from auto experts. Get expert

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The Owner’s Manual for New Car Shopping Road tests, reliability, owner satisfaction more

Find the best new cars and used cars at Consumer Reports, with reviews and ratings based on our expert and unbiased testing.


For sale: Road-tested German Sports Cars- Consumer Reports


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For sale: Road-tested German sports cars

The one question we get asked all the time is: What do you do with your test cars when you’re done with them? Since we buy every car we test, we can’t just simply give the cars back to the manufacturer when we’re done, like a typical press loan. Hence, we have to sell them.

We usually find someone among the hundreds of Consumer Reports employees that’s interested in buying the retired test car or we might simply trade it in for a new one.

That time has come for several convertibles and for a twist, we thought we’d offer these entertaining roadsters to our readers.

Forget how cold and gray it is in much of the country—spring will be here soon. And when the sun is shining, what’s more fun than a drop-top sports car ?

If you are interested in one of the low-mileage sports cars listed below, you can save about $10,000 over the price as-new and take delivery at the Consumer Reports test track in East Haddam, Connecticut. We’ll even give you a tour of the facilities and a few laps on the handling track in your new car. (Learn how Consumer Reports tests cars .)

Click on the name to see the complete road test (available to online subscribers).

2012 Audi TT 2.0 TFSI quattro S-Tronic (automatic)

Asking price: $36,500

MSRP: $45,300

Approximate miles: 6,600

2012 BMW Z4 sDrive28i (manual)

Asking price: $45,000

MSRP: $55,225

Approximate miles: 8,400

2012 Mercedes-Benz SLK250 (manual)

Asking price: $39,500

MSRP: $48,045

Approximate miles: 8,500

2013 Porsche Boxster (manual)

Asking price: $48,000

Serious buyers may contact us for more information and window stickers at crtestcars (at) gmail.com.


Consumer Reports: Lexus is most reliable car brand


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The annual survey finds General Motors, along with Volvo and Audi, on the rise

Story Highlights

    Lexus is the most reliable car brand, according to Consumer Reports Japanese brands make up seven of the top 10 brands

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Lexus, Toyota and Acura top Consumer Reports’ annual reliability survey, but a brand from General Motors and two from Europe have cut into the top 10.

Overall, Japanese brands took seven of the top 10 spots. All Lexus and Acura models earned an above average reliability score. All Infiniti, Mazda, and Toyota models were average or better.

The consumer magazine, whose annual ranking based on surveys of its readers are closely watched, says Audi has quietly been climbing through the reliability ranks. This year, it is fourth, up from eighth last year. The A6 sedan, Q7 SUV and Allroad wagon, all have “much better than average” reliability.

And under the heading of much improved, Volvo, the Swedish maker now controlled by a Chinese company, rose 13 places to finish seventh. GM made its mark with its GMC truck brand, which came in ninth. That was up from 12th last year. GMC wasn’t the only GM stand-out, however. Buick climbed nine slots to 12th place, with Buicks except the V-6 powered LaCrosse, which is no longer in the lineup, rated average or better.

When it comes to terrible reliability, the new Ford C-Max Energi plug-in hybrid brought up the rear. The non-plug hybrid version was pretty lousy, too. C-Max was also the worst vehicle in J.D. Power’s Initial Quality Study released earlier this year.

Not all Japanese models did well. The redesigned 2013 Honda Accord V-6 and the 2013 Nissan Altima are no longer recommended, having scored too poorly.

One of the key issues tripping up automakers in the survey continued to be balky electronics systems, especially in-car infotainment. CR says many of the systems are “buggy, with frustrating screen freezes, touch-control lag, or a reluctance to recognize a cell-phone, an MP3 device, or a voice command.”

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Certified Used Car – Consumer Reports


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These help give buyers peace of mind

Most automakers and some dealerships have developed certification systems that are intended to give buyers greater peace of mind when buying a used car. Certified used cars are billed as the cream of the crop, inspected and recon­ditioned according to stringent guide­lines. But they can cost hundreds or thousands of dollars more than noncert­ified vehicles.

Programs usually require candidates for certification be no more than five years old and have less than 60,000 or 70,000 miles. Manufacturer pro­grams also routinely exclude cars that have a suspicious title history or other seri­ous flaws.

Typically, the dealership screens, inspects, and reconditions the vehicle. The automaker then certifies that the car is sound and gives it a manufacturer-backed warranty. The warranty terms can differ significantly from one brand to another. Some start coverage from the date the car was first sold. Others begin when you buy the certified vehicle.

Certification programs also typi­cally throw in enhancements such as road­side assistance and trip interruption insurance. Since those items are gen­erally available through an auto-club membership, and shouldn’t be a decid­ing factor.

The term “certified” doesn’t mean much. CPO programs vary among manufacturers, and there is no industry standard definition of what “certified really means. Any used-car dealer can call a car certified. As a result, you’ll sometimes see a car labeled “certified” that has not undergone any reconditioning. It may carry only a service contract, the cost of which is rolled into the vehi­cle’s price.

Some aftermarket warran­ty programs that look like a manu­facturer’s certification. These “dealer certification” programs are underwrit­ten by warranty companies, insurers that sell a program to dealers who then resell it to consumers. Because the quality and terms of such contracts vary widely, it’s especially im­portant to read the fine print care­fully. Unscrupulous dealers can mislead car shoppers about the certification status of a given car, so it’s important to be wary.

Don’t assume that a certified car is worth the pre­mi­um price. You should expect a late-model, low-mileage car, you should expect it to be in good condition, anyway. Negotiate the price as you would any other used car.

When considering any certified car, ask the dealer specific questions:

  • Is the vehicle covered by a manufacturer-certified program or by a third-party plan sold by the dealer? Non-manufacturer plans are wild cards because they can vary greatly in quality.
  • What does the warranty cover, and for how long? Ask to see a copy of the warranty contract, not just a glossy brochure. Read the fine print.
  • Is there a deductible? If there is a charge for service, find out how much it is and whether you must pay it for each item serviced or for each service call. Ask about other fees, such as a “diagnostic” fee that’s added to the deductible.
  • Who provides the service? Ask whether you have to bring the car back to the orig­inal dealership for warranty work, or whether any same-brand dealership is fine. Ask what you’re required to do in an emergency.

If you are buying a well-maintained car with a good record of reliability, you aren’t taking much of a risk if you skip the certification route. But the real key for your peace of mind when buying a used vehicle is to have it thoroughly inspected by an independent mechanic.


Car buying guide – Consumer NZ


#cars guide
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Car buying guide

Everything you need to know about buying new and used cars

We explain the laws governing car sales, tell you how to deal with a dealer and how to decide if a car is worth buying. Plus reliable makes, car reviews and more.

When to trade up

Are regular trade-ups the smart thing to do?

It used to be that regular trade-ups of relatively new cars were the smart way to keep yourself on the road without paying too much in maintenance. But our surveys show cars are lasting way longer than they used to before the big repair bills kick in. So when should you buy a new one? Here’s our advice.

Around a third of a new car’s value will vanish by the end of the third year.

Run your car for as long as possible

One of the biggest costs of owning a car is depreciation, and the best way to minimise the effect of this is simple: keep your car longer. Around a third of a new car’s value will vanish by the end of the third year, and half by 5 years. Thereafter, if it’s a good car and you look after it, the rate slows down: by 10 years it will still hold around 20 percent of its value.

If you buy a 5-year-old car and keep it for 5 years, you’ll lose a lot less than buying new. You might want to run it even longer. The extra costs of replacing worn items in a well-maintained old car should still be a lot less than the depreciation on a new or near-new car. Shop around to keep repair costs down.

Watch for rust

The big warning sign is rust. Once rust takes hold, the car loses value rapidly and it is expensive to repair. If your car has rust, it could be time to sell.

The good news, though, is that rust is not the problem it used to be. Remember all those rusted-out doors and station-wagon tailgates in the 1980s? You don’t often see them now, because factory rust-prevention treatments are so much better.

Don’t worry about the odometer

Don’t worry about the odometer racking up large numbers. Once it clicks over 100,000 kilometres the distance travelled has less effect on the value. We hear of lots of cars that are still reliable at well over 200,000 kilometres.

Should you buy a new car?

Cars depreciate most during their first few years. That makes buying a new car and selling it after a few years a very expensive exercise. But many new cars can be bought at good discounts from the listed price. If you haggle hard to get a good discount and keep the car for at least 10 years, you will have the pleasure of buying a new car and you can ensure it is serviced regularly – so it should be reliable. Car safety improvements in recent years also means you will have a safer vehicle.

If buying new is not for you, then find a good car that has got past the worst part of the depreciation. But remember every time a car is sold, dealers take a chunk of profit. You pay that. Look for.

  • 2-3-year-old cars. They may have the remainder of the factory 3-year warranty, and are not too far behind in safety features.
  • Slightly older models, including Japanese imports, can be bought with factory-backed warranties under schemes run by the major car importers. The factory checks the cars, fixes any problems and sells them through dealer-approved schemes.
  • If your budget won’t stretch that far, look for well-maintained models 6 or more years old, even with over 100,000km on the clock.

Buy a reliable model

Pick from the models we recommend for reliability. For full details, see our Car reliability report.


Best used cars for under $15, 000 – Consumer Reports


#cars under 1000
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Best used cars for under $15,000

Buying a used car can be a great way to save money. The trick is to find a not only a good deal, but a good car—one that will be safe, reliable, and enjoyable for years. Our picks for the best used cars can help steer you in the right direction.

Consider this a quick cheat sheet, highlighting some standout models. For a deeper look at your options, tour the used-car section of ConsumerReports.org. where you’ll find reliability data, road tests, pricing, and much more. That said, we’ve selected these models as great choices.

Each performed well in our testing when new and had above-average reliability for the model years shown, based on our Annual Auto Survey. All of the models came standard with electronic stability control (ESC), a proven lifesaver, during the years indicated.

Visit our used car buying guide for quick access to the latest advice, Ratings, road tests, and videos.

Less than $10,000

The economical and efficient Sonata has a decent ride, secure handling, and a responsive four-cylinder engine that returned 23 mpg overall. The Acura TSX is a more upscale and sportier alternative. (Get detailed pricing .)

The RAV4 was redesigned in 2001, but it wasn’t until 2004 that it got standard antilock brakes and ESC. It has nimble handling, good brakes, easy cabin access, and a particularly strong engine. Fuel economy of 21 mpg is decent for an all-wheel-drive SUV. (Get detailed pricing .)

$10,000-$15,000

The Fit is an excellent choice among hatchbacks. It has amazing space utilization; responsive, agile handling; and a super-efficient four-cylinder engine that returns 30 mpg overall with an automatic transmission. For a bit more refinement, look for a Mazda3 hatchback or sedan. (Get detailed pricing .)