HR and Payroll Software #opera #3,opera #ii,opera,gold,capital,unity,accounting #software,accounts #software,business #software,accounting,accounts,business,pegasus,uk,ireland,small #businesses,finance,financial,modular,integrated,32bit,32-bit,sme,smes,payroll,human #resources,hr,personnel,general,nominal,management #reports,cashbook,bank #reconciliation,banking,sales,debtors,purchase,inventory,traceability,stock,order #processing,invoicing,purchasing,sop,pop,ecvat,job #costing,costing,fixed #assets,bom,bills #of #material,work #in #progress,edi,crm,vat,bacs,electronic #payments,credit #control,manufacturing,mrp,engineering,distribution,epos,retail,wholesale,multi-currency,multicurrency,multi #currency,emu,euro,single #currency,xml,web #trading,ecommerce,web #reporting,internet,extranet,intranet,paye,ir31,p14/60,p35,inland #revenue #tax #credits,national #insurance,ssp,smp,student #loans,basda,custom #& #excise,windows,nt,resellers,dealers,partners,opera #ii #small #business,opera #ii #enterprise,excel #reporting,integration,excel #accounting #software,reporting,business #intelligence,olap,cube #analysis,performance #management,drill #down,management #accounts


#

Opera 3 Payroll & HR

  • Multi-user, with Company and Group password control and menu level access restriction
  • Full integration with Opera 3 Document Management
  • Links to the Nominal Ledger, Cashbook and Costing Financial modules of Opera 3
  • Definable cheque and payslip designs to suit Company stationery requirements
  • Create unlimited Companies with unlimited employees per Company
  • Weekly, fortnightly, four weekly and monthly paid employees can be maintained all in one company
  • Employee profiles for efficient employee record creation
  • Employee payment details and payslip images can be retained for up to 999 pay periods
  • Payslips from past periods can be reprinted at any time
  • Employees can be paid via BACS, reducing the time and costs required to process payments
  • Submit Year-End Returns via the Government Gateway using the Pegasus Online Filing Manager
  • In-Year P45(1), P45(3) and P46 file generation for online submission using the Online Filing Manager
  • Filtered Historical employee record processing to current legislative bandwidths
  • Automated Director’s National Insurance calculations
  • Multiple Pension Scheme management
  • Track report on key field changes for the Payroll year using the Audit Log
  • Backup and Restore facility
  • Fully automated SSP, SMP and SPP (Birth) processing and reporting, with complex legislation built in
  • Automated Attachment Orders processing and reporting
  • Retrospective NI code changes with automatic adjustment value calculation and processing
  • Caters for Holiday pay across year-end

Employee Records

  • Address, bank details and holidays
  • Tax and National Insurance To-Date details
  • Payments and deductions – permanent and temporary values, retained units and rates, zero this period facility
  • Quick calculation – showing net pay, total deductions and NI’able earnings
  • Retained History with payslip image drill down
  • Employee photograph attachment
  • Ability to embed documents, spreadsheets etc, via OLE technology

Reports

  • Departmental reporting
  • Payslip, cheque and BACS list generation
  • P35, P14 and P60 End-of-Year reports
  • P45(1), P45(3) and P46 In-Year reports
  • P11 Deductions Working Sheet
  • P32 employer’s Payment Record, with payment and funding recording and multi-company consolidation
  • This Period and To Date summaries
  • Comprehensive statutory payments, Attachment Orders and pension contribution reports
  • Additional Reporter module available, for the creation of your own reports

Pensions

  • Mixed Pension schemes per company
  • Stakeholder Pensions
  • Fixed amount
  • Percentage of definable figure
  • Group Personal Pension
  • COMP
  • COSR
  • Freestanding AVC
  • Up to three different LEL/UEL criteria
  • Employee diary showing sickness, holidays, maternity and compassionate leave, and training
  • Variable employee working patterns reflected within the diary
  • Accurate days, hours and minutes event recording and analysis
  • Keep records for up to 99 years, including job changes and salary updates
  • Pro-rata holiday entitlement and holiday carry-over

Help

  • Comprehensive, context senstive help

Extended Information Sources

  • Export information to Microsoft products such as Word and Excel
  • Send reports via e-mail
  • Payroll administrator and management reports delivered via e-mail
  • Regularly notify staff of remaining holiday entitlement automatically by e-mail
  • Automatically notify managers of Payroll requirement by e-mail

If the Accident Is My Fault, Will My Auto Insurance Cover Me? #lower #my #bills #auto #insurance


#

If the Accident Is My Fault, Will My Auto Insurance Cover Me?

In most states, hashing out fault after a auto crash is important for one main reason — deciding whose insurance will foot the bill for repairs and medical expenses. For this reason, it’s crucial to get insurance that protects you, as well as the other driver, when you’re at fault in an accident.

Liability insurance will cover other occupants

Nearly all states require you to have a certain amount of liability coverage to pay for repairs and medical costs associated with accidents you cause.

Required liability coverage generally includes bodily injury (per person and per accident), property damage and, in some states, uninsured/underinsured motorist protection (which covers you if the at-fault driver is not insured or doesn’t have enough insurance).

Auto insurance that covers the policyholder

Liability insurance covers only the other driver’s expenses. So, if you have just the minimum liability coverage required by law, you’ll be footing the bill for your own car’s repairs and your medical bills if you cause an accident.

To be completely covered for an at-fault accident, you should carry the following types of insurance in addition to the liability coverage required by your state. All these types of coverage are optional, and they will raise your premium.

  • Collision coverage. Collision coverage pays for the repair or replacement of your car, even if you are at fault in an accident. It covers you whether you hit another car, a building or a tree, according to the National Association of Insurance Commissioners (NAIC). Collision coverage almost always includes a deductible — the amount you must pay before your insurance kicks in. Typical deductible amounts are $250, $500 and $1,000, according to NAIC. The higher your deductible, the lower your premium.
  • Medical payments coverage. If you don’t live in a no-fault state where personal injury protection is required, medical payments coverage pays for your medical costs and those of your passengers. It can even cover family members driving your car. Medical payments coverage typically pays for hospital stays, doctor’s visits, physical therapy and funeral expenses.

If you already have health insurance, you may not need this coverage. However, medical payments coverage for your car can sometimes help pay your health insurance deductible.

What are tort, no-fault laws?

Insurance coverage laws differ between so-called tort states and no-fault states. In tort states, fault is assigned in an accident, and the at-fault party’s insurance covers all costs. In a no-fault state, each party’s medical bills are covered by his or her own insurance company.

So, if you live in a no-fault state, your auto insurance already covers your injury costs, even if you’re at fault. No-fault states require you to purchase a minimum amount of personal injury protection (PIP) to cover your medical bills.

However, your basic no-fault auto insurance policy will not pay for damages to your car, according to Michigan’s Office of Financial and Insurance Regulation. You still will need to buy collision coverage.

See how much you could save today on your car insurance. Get your free auto insurance quotes today!

Editor’s note: This is an updated version of an article originally published on Dec. 31, 2013


About bills of sale #repossessed #cars #for #sale


#bill of sale car
#

About bills of sale

Before you purchase a vehicle, a trailer, a boat, a snowmobile or an ATV, make sure that you can receive acceptable proof of ownership. If you don’t have acceptable proof, you can have difficulties when go to you register the vehicle, or get a title certificate or transferable registration in your name.

Proof of ownership normally includes a bill of sale (in addition to a ‘Retail Certificate of Sale’ (MV-50) if purchased from a dealer, or a ‘Certificate of Title’ (MV-999) for private sales). The seller and the buyer complete the bill of sale. The DMV does not provide a form for a bill of sale.

What information is included on a bill of sale?

An acceptable bill of sale includes all of this information

  • year and make of the vehicle, boat or ATV
  • vehicle identification number (VIN) or the hull identification number (HIN)
  • date of the sale
  • purchase price
  • names and signatures of the buyer and the seller

The buyer and seller can make photocopies of the bill of sale to keep in their records. The new owner must give the original bill of sale to the DMV with the other required proofs of ownership. A bill of sale is not an acceptable proof of ownership without other proofs .

I received the vehicle as a gift.  Do I need a bill of sale?

Yes you do. If the vehicle is transferred as a gift, indicate this on the bill of sale and indicate that the purchase price is ‘$0.’ You must also indicate the vehicle is a gift on a Statement of Transaction (DTF-802).

Where can I find more information?


Should I Sell My Car to Get Out of Debt – Pay Off Bills? #national #car #hire


#sell car
#

Should I Sell My Car to Get Out of Debt Pay Off Bills?

By David Quilty

How strong is your desire to get out of debt? What are you willing to give up, sell, or live without in order to meet that dream head on? Would you be inclined to sell your beloved car in order to bring your balance sheet back into the black? In many cases, selling your car and going without one, or replacing it with something cheaper, can be a great way to finally pay off your debt.

To help you make this decision, evaluate how much your car is really costing you. To do this, you must think beyond your monthly payment. Sure, your payment may only be $280 a month, but that doesn t include any associated costs like rising gas prices. car insurance. scheduled (and unscheduled) auto maintenance, and any parking permits or parking fees you have to pay for work or home. Depending on where you live and what you drive, this could add up to a small fortune every month.

Is that amount inhibiting you from paying off your debt? If so, consider selling your car. Or maybe trading in that money-pit would be the way to go for your finances. Whether or not this move makes sense will depend on your car, your habits, and your locale.

Questions to Ask Before Selling Your Car

1. How Much Do You Spend on Gas, Insurance, and Maintenance?

All cars carry at least these three expenses. Some cars are gas guzzlers, while others prefer to sip (e.g. hybrid cars ), which means big savings for you at the pump. Insurance can also be significantly more expensive for, say, a red sports car compared to a Volvo station-wagon.

Maintenance is another expense that for some cars can be significantly higher than for others. For example, does your car need specialty dealer-made parts, or are off-brands available? Can you perform DIY car maintenance tips on your own? An analysis of these factors can help you determine how much your car is really costing you, and if it s worth giving up.

2. Do You Still Owe Money on Your Car?

If you are only one year into a five-year payment plan, chances are that you owe way more on your vehicle than a buyer would be willing to pay for it (i.e. upside down car loan ). The minute you drive your new car off the dealer s lot, you lose thousands of dollars in value.

Find out how much your car is currently worth on a site like Kelley Blue Book or Edmunds. If you sold the car, could you pay off the balance directly out of the sales price? Or would you have to dig into your emergency savings to cover the remainder?

Or is the balance owed completely above and beyond your ability to pay? If you can t cover the remaining balance without borrowing more money, keep the car and continue to make payments. That said, keep tabs on the value of your car versus the balance on your loan. Once you can come close to breaking even, consider selling the car again.

3. Do You Own Your Car Outright?

When you own your car outright (i.e. you have the title in hand), you can sell it for whatever the market will bear. If it s worth $5,000 and you sell it for that, will that make a serious dent in your debt? You need to weigh the reward you get from paying down or paying off your debt against what you give up by selling your car.

If you have an extra car that sits unused most of the time, or if you can carpool with your spouse, it might be well worth it. On the other hand, if you give up your only mode of transportation to work, it s probably a bad idea to sell your car.

4. Do You Even Need a Car?

Most New Yorkers can live without a car due to the high quality public transportation system, the walkable commutes, the bike lanes to ride your bike to work. and the constant availability of taxi cabs. Los Angeles residents, on the other hand,   find it difficult to get anywhere without their own car because the city is so spread out and public transportation is only available in select areas.

If you live and work in a city that encourages residents to be vehicle-free, why not try it out for a while? And if you still occasionally need a car, check and see if your area has any car-sharing services. These services rent cars by the hour or day and include gas, insurance, and maintenance for a very reasonable price.

5. If You Still Need a Car, Can You Afford a Cheaper One?

Let s say you sell your car and put the money towards your debt, but you still need a car. Can you afford a smaller, less expensive vehicle using the monthly interest you ve saved by paying down your debt? If you d have to borrow money to buy a car again, think twice before selling the one you already own. But if you can sell your car, are able to pay off some debt with the proceeds, and can still afford to pay cash for a cheaper car, then definitely consider selling.

6. What About Lifestyle Considerations?

You don t want to find out too late that you needed the gas-guzzling Suburban and can t get along without it. For example, do you enjoy carting your daughter s entire soccer team, plus gear, to various games and events? Or, do you otherwise need to transport large loads that a 45 mpg vehicle just can t handle? In addition to expenses, examine how you use your car and how or if you could live without it, or with something different.


Should I Sell My Car to Get Out of Debt – Pay Off Bills? #vehicles


#sell car
#

Should I Sell My Car to Get Out of Debt Pay Off Bills?

By David Quilty

How strong is your desire to get out of debt? What are you willing to give up, sell, or live without in order to meet that dream head on? Would you be inclined to sell your beloved car in order to bring your balance sheet back into the black? In many cases, selling your car and going without one, or replacing it with something cheaper, can be a great way to finally pay off your debt.

To help you make this decision, evaluate how much your car is really costing you. To do this, you must think beyond your monthly payment. Sure, your payment may only be $280 a month, but that doesn t include any associated costs like rising gas prices. car insurance. scheduled (and unscheduled) auto maintenance, and any parking permits or parking fees you have to pay for work or home. Depending on where you live and what you drive, this could add up to a small fortune every month.

Is that amount inhibiting you from paying off your debt? If so, consider selling your car. Or maybe trading in that money-pit would be the way to go for your finances. Whether or not this move makes sense will depend on your car, your habits, and your locale.

Questions to Ask Before Selling Your Car

1. How Much Do You Spend on Gas, Insurance, and Maintenance?

All cars carry at least these three expenses. Some cars are gas guzzlers, while others prefer to sip (e.g. hybrid cars ), which means big savings for you at the pump. Insurance can also be significantly more expensive for, say, a red sports car compared to a Volvo station-wagon.

Maintenance is another expense that for some cars can be significantly higher than for others. For example, does your car need specialty dealer-made parts, or are off-brands available? Can you perform DIY car maintenance tips on your own? An analysis of these factors can help you determine how much your car is really costing you, and if it s worth giving up.

2. Do You Still Owe Money on Your Car?

If you are only one year into a five-year payment plan, chances are that you owe way more on your vehicle than a buyer would be willing to pay for it (i.e. upside down car loan ). The minute you drive your new car off the dealer s lot, you lose thousands of dollars in value.

Find out how much your car is currently worth on a site like Kelley Blue Book or Edmunds. If you sold the car, could you pay off the balance directly out of the sales price? Or would you have to dig into your emergency savings to cover the remainder?

Or is the balance owed completely above and beyond your ability to pay? If you can t cover the remaining balance without borrowing more money, keep the car and continue to make payments. That said, keep tabs on the value of your car versus the balance on your loan. Once you can come close to breaking even, consider selling the car again.

3. Do You Own Your Car Outright?

When you own your car outright (i.e. you have the title in hand), you can sell it for whatever the market will bear. If it s worth $5,000 and you sell it for that, will that make a serious dent in your debt? You need to weigh the reward you get from paying down or paying off your debt against what you give up by selling your car.

If you have an extra car that sits unused most of the time, or if you can carpool with your spouse, it might be well worth it. On the other hand, if you give up your only mode of transportation to work, it s probably a bad idea to sell your car.

4. Do You Even Need a Car?

Most New Yorkers can live without a car due to the high quality public transportation system, the walkable commutes, the bike lanes to ride your bike to work. and the constant availability of taxi cabs. Los Angeles residents, on the other hand,   find it difficult to get anywhere without their own car because the city is so spread out and public transportation is only available in select areas.

If you live and work in a city that encourages residents to be vehicle-free, why not try it out for a while? And if you still occasionally need a car, check and see if your area has any car-sharing services. These services rent cars by the hour or day and include gas, insurance, and maintenance for a very reasonable price.

5. If You Still Need a Car, Can You Afford a Cheaper One?

Let s say you sell your car and put the money towards your debt, but you still need a car. Can you afford a smaller, less expensive vehicle using the monthly interest you ve saved by paying down your debt? If you d have to borrow money to buy a car again, think twice before selling the one you already own. But if you can sell your car, are able to pay off some debt with the proceeds, and can still afford to pay cash for a cheaper car, then definitely consider selling.

6. What About Lifestyle Considerations?

You don t want to find out too late that you needed the gas-guzzling Suburban and can t get along without it. For example, do you enjoy carting your daughter s entire soccer team, plus gear, to various games and events? Or, do you otherwise need to transport large loads that a 45 mpg vehicle just can t handle? In addition to expenses, examine how you use your car and how or if you could live without it, or with something different.


About bills of sale #electric #cars


#bill of sale car
#

About bills of sale

Before you purchase a vehicle, a trailer, a boat, a snowmobile or an ATV, make sure that you can receive acceptable proof of ownership. If you don’t have acceptable proof, you can have difficulties when go to you register the vehicle, or get a title certificate or transferable registration in your name.

Proof of ownership normally includes a bill of sale (in addition to a ‘Retail Certificate of Sale’ (MV-50) if purchased from a dealer, or a ‘Certificate of Title’ (MV-999) for private sales). The seller and the buyer complete the bill of sale. The DMV does not provide a form for a bill of sale.

What information is included on a bill of sale?

An acceptable bill of sale includes all of this information

  • year and make of the vehicle, boat or ATV
  • vehicle identification number (VIN) or the hull identification number (HIN)
  • date of the sale
  • purchase price
  • names and signatures of the buyer and the seller

The buyer and seller can make photocopies of the bill of sale to keep in their records. The new owner must give the original bill of sale to the DMV with the other required proofs of ownership. A bill of sale is not an acceptable proof of ownership without other proofs .

I received the vehicle as a gift.  Do I need a bill of sale?

Yes you do. If the vehicle is transferred as a gift, indicate this on the bill of sale and indicate that the purchase price is ‘$0.’ You must also indicate the vehicle is a gift on a Statement of Transaction (DTF-802).

Where can I find more information?