Buying a Car: What to Know Before You Go – Feature – Car and Driver #car #dvd


#car buy
#

Car-buying tips to follow before you ever set foot in a car dealership.

Feature

Now is a good time to buy a new car. The struggles facing the auto industry are unprecedented and so are the deals available to buyers. Car dealers need to sell cars in order to stay in business, which makes this a strong buyers market. Rebates, financing, and trade-in values are the best they ve been in a long time.

But that doesn t mean it s an easy time to buy a car, and it doesn t mean dealers are going to lie down and give the cars away. A savvy buyer must always be ready, and the preparation should start before you ever set foot in a showroom.

Know the Invoice Price

Once you ve settled on what car is right for you. look up the invoice price for that car in our Buyer s Guide. Invoice price is what the dealer pays the manufacturer for the car; the manufacturer s suggested retail price (MSRP, or sticker price ) includes hundreds usually thousands of dollars of profit for the dealer. With the exception of all-new or very popular models, you should be able to get a new car for closer to invoice than MSRP. Knowing the invoice price of your car will tell the dealer that you mean business and expect a good deal. Don t walk into the dealership without this information.

Check the Manufacturer s Website for Rebates

Many buyers will qualify for multiple rebates, some of which may not even be made public. You might belong to organizations or receive coupons in the mail that entitle you to additional rebates. Be aware of all rebates for which you qualify and make sure you receive them. Dealers are known for not giving buyers every rebate available to them, instead keeping one or two as additional profit.

Research the Dealers

Buying from a cooperative and fair dealer will save you money and headaches. There are a number of websites that allow people to post reviews of dealerships, but their coverage is spotty and incomplete. If you can t find online reviews of the dealer you are considering, just talk to people. Your friends and neighbors purchase cars and should be honest with you about whether they were happy with their car or dealer.

Check Your Credit History

Most people who shop for cars will need a loan. How much that loan costs will depend on your credit history, and knowing your credit history will give you a better idea what to expect from lenders. The Fair and Accurate Credit Transaction Act of 2003 (FACTA) allows every consumer to get a free copy of his or her credit report once a year from each of the three major credit-reporting agencies (TransUnion, Experian, and Equifax). Get a copy of your credit report, and check it for accuracy. Pay the extra few dollars to get your credit score as well, as it is one of the major factors that banks use to determine your creditworthiness.

Get Your Own Financing

The biggest profit center for a car dealership is its finance department. Dealers contract with banks to get the best rates available but might not actually give you those rates. They might get you a car loan for 4.9 percent APR but draw up your finance contract at 5.9 percent. That one-percent markup is strictly profit for the dealer. You can often get a better interest rate from your local bank or credit union, or you can present the rates you were offered elsewhere to your salesman and challenge him to match or beat them. That being said, promotional rates from manufacturers sometimes as low as zero percent can be tough to beat.

Time Your Purchase

Dealers run on a month-to-month basis. At the end of the month, many will accept lower offers to reach their goals and qualify for manufacturer bonuses. If you re not picky about having the latest and greatest, the end of a model year is a great time to get good deals on remaining inventory. And December particularly the last week before the new year is a slow time for car sales, so if you can hack some time out of your holiday-shopping schedule, it s a wise time to buy.

Also, most dealerships are busier on weekends. The weekdays are generally slow, especially in the morning. If you come into the dealership on a midweek morning when business is slow, the salespeople are more likely to make a good deal as well. They need sales and they want to look busy, which keeps them motivated to give you a better deal and earn your business.

Do Not Buy a Car on Your First Visit

Use the first visit to look at and test-drive the car(s) you are interested in. Gather your information and then leave, and be adamant that you will not be buying a car today. This will communicate to the dealer that you are not going to be bullied. Watch what you say to the salespeople especially if they ask you how much you are prepared to pay monthly because whatever you say will be used as a starting point from which the dealer will go up when negotiations eventually start.

Get Internet Quotes from Several Dealers

CARandDRIVER.com offers free online pricing quotes from your local dealers. Get quotes from multiple dealers before you ever visit any of them. If dealers know they are being pitted against other stores, it will be easier for you to get their best offer right off the bat, and waltzing into a dealership with a first offer already in hand gives you an advantage in negotiations.

Make an Appointment with the Sales Manager

Once your research is done and you are ready to head to the dealership to purchase a new car, call ahead and make an appointment. By calling a sales manager to make your appointment, you communicate that you are serious about this transaction and know what you are doing. You will still be paired with a salesman when you arrive, but your chances improve of getting a straight shooter who knows you won t be easy fodder.

There is no guarantee you will get a good deal on a new-car purchase, nor is there a set price to negotiate toward with any car; pricing always varies with content, age, supply, and demand. But following these rules will start you in the right direction to get the best deal possible on your new car.

Brian Munroe is the author of Car Buying Revealed. You can find out about Munroe and his book at his website, www.CarBuyingRevealed.com.


6 Things Every Sucker Should Know Before Buying a Used Car #car #transportation


#buy a used car
#

6 Things Every Sucker Should Know Before Buying a Used Car

By Robert Brockway October 25, 2012 1,279,484 Views

Buying a used car is like going to a dentist who wants to knock out your old teeth and sell you new ones. Everybody involved in the process is assuredly biased, possibly psychotic, and actively wants to do you bodily harm. More sad, dissatisfied people have left car dealerships than strip clubs, and it’s no wonder: Cars are extremely complicated, terribly expensive, and for some reason every one is guarded by a small gang of pathological liars. It’s one of the worst experiences of your life, and you need somebody trustworthy to help you. Unfortunately, you’ve got me. Lucky for you, I have bought and destroyed more cars than is technically allowable by the United States government, and am therefore legally obligated to actually try to help you in this column, which I do as a “service” to the “community.” I think we can get through this, if you take my advice to heart.*

*Well, except for all the times I tell you to “flip the table on them bitches.” That’s just some good general advice I try to work in everywhere, and may not be applicable to the situation at hand.

#6. Do Your Research

Never, ever walk into a dealership “just to see what they’ve got.” Salesmen see that aimless stare on your face and they’re like starving cartoon wolves — they don’t even see a person; all they see is a giant walking turkey leg. Most small and midsize dealerships will have online inventories. Check those out in advance and start looking up the models you’re interested in, then read up on each one: Comb through car sites like Edmunds, click on forum posts by owners, get the specs and find out about users’ experience with reliability — hell, go to Wikipedia and bone up on the entire history of the model and the powertrain you’re considering. Back in school, you’d do the same amount of research for a book report on Huck Finn just because an older lady in a paneled skirt threatened you with the alphabet — you can do the same legwork for a multi-thousand-dollar purchase you’re going to entrust your life to every time you leave the house to get a burrito. Whatever you do, the point is to come in with a mental list: Do not let them steer you outside of that list to a car that you’re not familiar with. Adventure is wondrous and grand, but the used car lot is not the place to listen to strange old men in tattered clothes whisper of magical chariots.

“It’s dangerous to go alone. Take this Daihatsu!”

Now this is the important part, so pay attention: No matter what anybody tells you — no matter how respectable the source — never, ever, ever buy the Kia. Regardless of dealership affiliation, every used car lot on the planet has a dull red Kia out back that they want to show you. It’s going to feel wrong, somehow, like the air around it has gone stale. That’s the universe trying to warn you. There will be rational arguments, and your brain is gonna be all like, “Hey, it sounds like they’ve gotten a lot better lately,” and, “Look, even the car magazines think they’ve got some decent models.” But there’s a very simple explanation for this illusion: It’s a vast government conspiracy and everybody is in on it but me. They are terrible cars that will explode and betray you, no matter how meticulously you care for them. Isn’t that right, Optima, you fickle bitch?! You broke my heart! And for what? A measly 15,000 miles? I thought we had something! I spent two years inside of you. Does that mean nothing?!

#5. Dealing With the Dealer

You need to treat the first few moments at a dealership like an old-timey mobster being interrogated by the coppers: You don’t say nothin’ about nothin’. Financing? What’s that? Trade-ins? Ha, what a hilarious portmanteau of gibberish! Price range? I don’t even speak English.

The first step is just and only to find the car you want, go over it carefully, take stock of any work that needs doing, and barter out the final price. Only when that’s all settled do you talk about trading in something. Why would you discuss trade-ins right up front if you haven’t even found a car you like? You’re not even sure you’re shopping there yet. The grocery store doesn’t pull you aside when you walk in the doors and ask how much you’re planning to spend today. So why do dealerships always want to know your price, payment and trades first? Because it gives them leverage against you: “Oh, well, if we’re going to do you a favor and take this trade-in off your hands, you have to buy one of these pre-selected vehicles.” Or, “Oh, you’re financing? Those aren’t our finance cars. Our finance cars are all dull red Kias; let’s go out back and take a look.”

“Ignore the disembodied voices telling you to flee. That’s a. feature. Ghost-voicing. Costs extra.”

That’s bullshit. Everything is a finance car. Just like everything is a cash car. The car does not care how you pay for it. It is a car. Even if it becomes sentient, it’s mostly only going to care about fighting crime and ramping shit, like K.I.T.T. from Knight Rider. And brother, if that happens: You let it. You buy yourself a leather jacket and a perm and get the fuck out of there; your car search is over.

#4. Vehicle Inspection

There are a few basic things you can check, even if you know nothing about cars. First thing you want to do is get right up close against the side of the front fender. (This should also serve to draw out any potential sentient-car crime-fighting partners, as they cannot resist wisecracking and will likely say something cute like, “Geez, buy me dinner first.” If so, then you’re done: It’s all cowhide coverings and curly hair for the rest of your days.) If there’s little to no rapport between you and the vehicle at this point, just sight down the trim lines to make sure they’re straight with no fluctuations — offset doors, fenders, and uneven lines could indicate frame damage. Look around the engine bay at the spots where the metal struts come together — the joints should be straight, with no signs of recent welding. Take a look underneath the car and watch for rust on the rails, in the wheel wells, or basically anywhere else. Be afraid of rust. Rust is the mind-killer. You’ll think you can take rust — it’s just some pansy little oxidation, right? But you can’t. Rust is better than you. Rust will laugh at your feeble angle grinders; it will spit at your steel wool and mock your puny acids. Rust will shrug off all your mightiest efforts and then, when you are broken, it will take your woman in a way that you never could.

“F. from behind? I don’t know, man; I’m just a chemical process.”

Also remember to CHECK. THE. FUCKING. FLUIDS. Don’t just stare at the engine with your dick in your hand, wondering if you could stop the flywheel with your cock (no matter how awesome it would be to seize a V8 with nothing but your willpower and steely erection, this is not the time for it). Pull those dipsticks out and check the reservoirs. Brake fluid is, in an ideal world, clear to slightly yellowish. But the world we live in is broken and flawed, so it’s usually tea-colored. If it looks like strong coffee, you’re going to need to bleed the brake system, at the very least. That’s a few hundred dollars right there. It doesn’t require a lot of know-how or expensive parts, so you’re going to want to do it yourself.

Do not.

Bleeding brakes is exactly as traumatic as bleeding your only child, only it takes like, four times as long (depending on size and age of child). Check the oil: If it looks like a Wendy’s chocolate Frosty, just turn around and run. Run as fast as you can. Hop into your car and tear ass out of that dealership like The Dukes of Hazzard. That means a blown head-gasket, and it is death. If somebody assures you, “It’ll still run,” you can respond, “So will a man with no legs, if you shoot at him enough; that doesn’t mean he’ll get far.” (The casual murder references let ’em know you mean business.)

“Hi, Bob. Nice to meet you. I’ve killed four men. Every one of them stole from me.”

Make sure the coolant is clear, the transmission fluid is red or purplish (just not black or oily) and all the belts and hoses are free of cracks. Finally, if it’s a new car or a big expense, you buy yourself a copy of a program like Torque, then go on eBay and get an ODBII scanner. Plug that into the car (the ODB slot is usually beneath the dash on the driver’s side) and you can see literally everything about its engine in real time, right there on your smartphone. Do me a favor and look at the salesman’s face when you do it: See that expression? That’s what hope looks like, as it leaves the world. He’s just realized he’s not going to win this one, because you’re from the future — you’ve already done this deal.


Portable DVD Players – Before You Buy #second #hand #car #prices


#dvd player for car
#

Before You Buy a Portable DVD Player

By Jason Hidalgo. Portable Electronics Expert

Jason Hidalgo is a reporter who currently covers business and technology. Read more

Smartphones have turned into the de facto portable movie players of today s mobile world. But for a lot of folks, being able to watch their DVD collection on the go remains an important source of entertainment.

Here s a look at things you should think about before buying a portable DVD player. For a list of the best players we ve tried, see our Top Portable DVD Players list.

WHADDYA WANT?

You should carefully consider if you’ll be primarily using your portable DVD player as a carry-along device or a car player. If want the former, then pick a laptop-style portable DVD player that would rest comfortably on your, well, lap.

If your goal is a portable DVD player that serves as a car player, then get one designed for vehicular use.

Most of these come with two screens that can be installed behind the headrest of the front seats so passengers in the back can comfortably watch the same movie. Ideally, you’ll want both screens to have earphone jacks as well for greater flexibility.

DON T FORGET THE TWEENER

Speaking of flexibility, some “regular” players also come with mounting straps for car use. These are great for folks who want to buy a portable DVD player that they would mostly carry around but still want the option of being able to mount it inside a vehicle should the need arise.

Continue Reading Below

Just make sure you strap them properly. You don t want your reasonably-priced-to-mighty-pricey investment crashing on the floor or hitting some poor passenger in the back.

DIMENSIONS OF COMPATIBILITY

Are you planning on using your portable DVD player as a device that you can carry around from room-to-room at home? Maybe you just need sanity insurance during the occasional family gathering in case the relatives start talking about the horrors inflicted by your evil aunt? If so, you can go with one of the bulkier ones with a bigger screen and enjoy the larger, face-shielding viewing experience that comes with it.

WHAT IF I FLY A LOT?

If you want a frequent flying companion, however, then you may want to consider going for a smaller player. Not only does weight easily add up when you’re cramming stuff into your carry on, you also don’t want to be fiddling around with a honking-huge player when you‘re taking off your shoes and emptying your pockets as other passengers give you the evil stare while going through airport security.

MEDIA SAVVINESS

Do you, er, I mean “your mom,” love watching Korean or Asian dramas? Then you’ll likely want a portable DVD player that can play video CDs. Maybe you like watching Japanese anime that you’ve downloaded from the Web? Then perhaps you’ll want a player that plays DIVX or AVI files (unless your files are primarily formatted in MKV, which is admittedly a bit of a challenge to find a portable DVD player for). Newer players that can play Blu-ray discs are also starting to pop up. Some players can even play non-video content such as MP3s or JPEG photos if you want something that doubles as a media player.

DOES IT HAVE THE JUICE?

As with any portable device, battery life is a prime consideration. After all, there’s nothing more horrible than running out of juice just as your favorite beach volleyball scene with the lowered nets from Top Gun gloriously plays on your portable DVD player’s screen.

Ideally, you‘ll want a device with a battery life of at least 3.5 hours to 4 hours so you can watch two regular-length flicks or one of those extended cuts of the Lord of the Rings movies. Well, that or being able to rewind and rewatch the Top Gun volleyball scene with Tom Cruise over and over and over and over.

MAXIMUM OUTPUTS

Portable DVD players aren’t just about taking your movies on the go. Sometimes, it’s also nice to have the option to connect it to your television at home.

If you like that capability, make sure you get a portable DVD player with audio-video connectors that plug into any standard television. Devices such as Panasonic’s DMP-B15 Blu-ray player even have an HDMI port that allows you to connect it to a high-definition TV.

For audiophiles, some players also offer surround sound capability.

EXTRAS COST

Extra features can go a long way in adding a bit more enjoyment to your portable viewing experience.

Some players, for example, feature screens that can swivel around for easy viewing, fold into a tabletlike shape, or even stand up like a picture frame. Others throw in YouTube access via wireless connectivity.

As far as cost goes, the good news is that portable DVD players are available at pretty much any budget. Naturally, devices with bigger screens and lots of features will come with a higher price tag. But you can also still get some pretty solid devices under $200 if you shop around.


The Truth About – Before and After – Weight Loss Photos #women #weight #loss,relationships,dating,body #image,before #and #after #photo,weight #loss,weight #loss #before #and #after #body #image,women #before #after #photo


#

The Truth About ‘Before and After’ Weight Loss Photos

I am the girl on the billboard, the amazing transformation you see on the cover of People magazine, the “before and after” ad for the new diet pill with an asterisk next to my name, the small print reading: *Results not typical. It’s pictures like mine that had a high school version of me spending all of her allowance on Metabolife because if the girl in the magazine could do it, then surely I could, too. And I knew back then that everything in my life would be better, easier, perfect even. if I could just not be fat anymore.

I knew this because that’s what I was told, not by my doctor (because he was old and who needed to listen to him?) but by the most important voices my teenage ears heard. I knew it because Courtney Cox went from being a lonely, dateless loser who breaks porch swings and didn’t have a prom date to a svelte and sexy crop top-wearing serial man-eater on Friends. I knew it because even though she was one of my favorite actresses, Sarah Rue didn’t get the cover of any magazines until she dropped five dress sizes. I knew it because books like Jemima J by Jane Green told me in their shiny chick-lit packaging that even if he notices how smart you are, even if he laughs at your jokes, even if he tells you that you have “such a pretty face,” he won’t admit he wants you until you lose your fat ass. Whether you are seeing it on the silver screen or network cable, on the cover of a magazine or in the pages of a novel, the weight loss Cinderella story you are told is always the same. Lose the fat — and Bibbity Bobbity Boo! — your life instantly becomes a fairy tale.

As someone who has been living as an “after” for the past three years, I can assure you that the fairy tale just isn’t true. Things didn’t suddenly become prime-time perfect when I lost 180 pounds. Yes, I am happier and healthier than I was before my journey started but if you think my life resembles anything like what you see on TV or in the movies you are sadly mistaken. So what does the life of an “after” entail? What’s the part you aren’t seeing in those glossy promotional photos from The Biggest Loser or on the billboards for lap-band surgery on the side of the highway? What does the reality of losing over 150 pounds actually look like? It looks like this:

You see, there is an art to living with a post-weight loss body. It starts every single morning, when I meticulously check myself for new wounds or rashes or sores, side effects of the twenty-some pounds of excess skin that hangs from my frame like a Sharpei. This skin is a road map of scars — incandescent and faded stretch marks from the fluctuations in my weight over the years, crossing the angry, red, raised scabs from my most recent round of infections. It’s skin that no matter how often I have to get medically treated, my health insurance won’t help pay to remove, calling the surgery “cosmetic in nature.” I separate the folds where my navel used to be, before the weight of my apron of excess flesh made it virtually collapse in on itself, and clean it with antibacterial wipes. I make sure I have enough to get me through the day because it is a process I will have to repeat at least once before I go to sleep. I use no fewer than five different ointments and talcums and lotions that are supposed to help keep my skin dry/aid in reducing my scarring/heal my current bedsores. Sometimes I get lucky and there are none. These times are few and far between.

After this initial scar-scanning and cleansing, I begin the process of folding and tucking and binding my body until it looks as tight and as lifted as possible. I put on the clothes I have painstakingly purchased, clothes that 300-pound Candice would have never dreamed of being able to wear. When I was big, this was the part of the fairy tale I fantasized about the most. For years, I had been relegated to the two or three stores that catered to plus-sized women, none of which I would call particularly fashion-forward, because the vast majority of retailers refused to carry my size. The thing is, while I now have virtually every store at my disposal, finding clothing to fit my body is actually harder in some ways. In an era of ultra-low rise, hip-hugging jeans, finding denim that fits my legs while still buttoning over the hang of empty, drooping skin on my stomach is an effort in futility. Shirts with shorter sleeves have to be purchased a size or two up to fit the sag of my bat-wing arms that won’t go away no matter how many bicep curls I do. That leaves the rest of the garment lying listless and sack-like on my now slender frame. Any hopes I had of finally being comfortable in the summertime were dashed the first time I looked for shorts in a size 2 that were long enough to cover the drapes of extra skin that pooled around my thighs. And trust me when I say that there is nothing more frustrating than attempting to find a one-piece bathing suit that is a) not some skirted monstrosity your grandmother would wear and b) not held together by tiny bits of string.

Even the undergarments that I rely on for both support and yes, vanity, stop at a size 4. Nobody with my body could possibly need Spanx, right? As a woman, your hemlines are higher, your fabric is thinner, and your pants are tighter when you dip below a certain size but none of these things work for someone who has pounds of skin to hide. While I would never in a million years pretend to have it as hard as I did when I was plus-sized, shopping did not turn out to be the joy I expected. Instead, it’s become a game of smoke and mirrors and magic tricks, one that I have become a master of over the last three years.

But the smoke and mirrors only go so far, and as a single woman in my early 30s, I’ve had to learn the most painful truth about the weight loss fairy tale: more than one Prince Charming has ridden off on his horse when the reality of my perfectly packaged body turned out not to be as perfect as he thought. Dating becomes less about connection and more about timing.

How many dates can you go on before you have to out yourself as having been fat? How long before they notice that your body doesn’t feel quite right even over your clothes? How long can you put off being seen naked?

You can never quite get comfortable with this secret over your head, this time bomb waiting to blow everything up. Where before you might have felt confident and sexy, you now fumble awkwardly because you are too hyper-focused on hiding your body to let yourself fully enjoy the moment. Yes, some men will tell you that it doesn’t matter. They will tell you that they like you for who you are, that you are beautiful regardless of what’s under your clothes. But that doesn’t stop you from noticing even the slightest hesitation in their touch or a flicker of doubt on their face. And when your relationship ends, like so many do, you are left wondering “what if?” What if you had a normal body? What if you had been the woman he expected based on all his preconceptions? Maybe he didn’t call you back because he didn’t like the way you talked about politics all the time, or perhaps the fact that you curse like a sailor was a turn off for him. Maybe the chemistry just wasn’t there. But in the back of your mind, you always know — or think you know — that it wasn’t any of those things.

Life as an “after” is not perfect. You won’t suddenly get the guy, the promotion, or the popularity you’ve always wanted just because you are thin. If you are looking for a fairytale ending, you won’t find it no matter how much weight you lose. And if you focus only on the aesthetics, your journey won’t ever really be complete. Why? Because you don’t suddenly develop self-esteem when you drop 10 pants sizes or fit into a small. It has taken me a few years, but I am learning how to accept this fact myself. I’m learning to not be ashamed of the physical manifestations of my hard work. Learning to trust that there is someone out there who will love me regardless of whether or not I can ever afford to pay for the reconstructive surgery I so desperately need.

I am not saying I get it right 100 percent of the time, or that I don’t sometimes look in the mirror at my naked body wondering why I am exhausting myself every day for results that I will never fully see. But then I walk up a flight of stairs without stopping to catch my breath or tie my own shoes because I can reach my feet and I remember what my motivation was behind my weight loss to begin with. It wasn’t for a guy or a raise or to fit into some preconceived notion of beauty, but for my physical well-being. That’s the problem with our obsession with “before and afters.” They help sell you a fairytale where everything is perfect with the wave of a magic wand as long as your gown fits nicely. They’re all about what people see and not at all about what truly matters. They don’t tell you the truth: that regardless of what the Monica Gellar’s and Jemima J’s of the world try to tell you, your self-worth is not dependent on a number on the scale or a size tag sewn into the back of a cocktail dress.

You are the same person you were, just with slightly different packaging. And unless you learn to love the person that you see in the “before,” nobody will ever accept you as an “after.” Not even you.

Candice Russell is an activist and freelancer living in Dallas by way of Seattle. Read more of her writing on her blog www.dear-internet.com


Car Reviews – No new Nissan GT-R before 2020, Z-Car will live on #cars #direct


#new car reviews
#

Thread: Car Reviews – No new Nissan GT-R before 2020, Z-Car will live on

Car Reviews – No new Nissan GT-R before 2020, Z-Car will live on

There will be no new GT-R before 2020 and the rumoured death of the Z-car won’t take place under the watch of Chief Product Specialist and Nismo boss Hiroshi Tamura. That’s the message from the 2015 Nismo Festival, where the head of Nismo won’t actually tell us much about what is being worked on behind the scenes, but he is willing to spruik the motorsport link to Nissan – and Nismo’s – DNA.

“That’s a secret, I’m sorry,” he says to most questions we ask him during our brief press conference.

“Nismo is currently present in three markets: Europe, USA and Japan,” Tamura-san tells us. “We are preparing to launch in other markets globally and bring our range of vehicles to those markets. It’s important for Nissan, for Nismo, and it is something we have been working on for some time.”

As we’ve seen in Australia though, the launch of the Nismo brand has dragged on somewhat.

While Nismo is an important part of Tamura-san’s brief, its the GT-R that everyone wants to know about. Pressed on whether the Vision 2020 Concept is in fact the next GT-R, Tamura-san is non-committal, despite admitting that these concepts very often do become the production car.

He also reminds us that the driveline that came into production in the twin-turbo 300ZX had been shown in a concept car some years before. Will the Vision 2020 Concept’s hybrid drivetrain feature in*the next GT-R? Tamura-san won’t commit to an answer on that either.

“If you take a look at the concept we showed in 2001, for example, you can see a lot of that in the current GT-R,” he says. “Sometimes these design models aren’t entirely accurate and, despite having our spiritual DNA within them, things need to be changed to make it to production. We need time to work on and release the evolutionary upgrades – not just for the styling but also the mechanical underpinnings and the engineering.”

It seems, then, that the Vision 2020 Concept is at the very least a window into Nissan and Nismo’s future regarding the new GT-R. Tamura-san is also unwilling to admit that the new GT-R’s release has been delayed by rumoured issues with crash testing in the US specifically, and simply reiterates that engineering work takes time.

Shifting focus slightly, we ask the Nismo boss whether the new GT-R will be designed with a Nurburgring lap time as its most important achievement.

“There is a limit to how far we can push that kind of development,” he says. “Firstly, the GT-R is a road car, so no matter how fast we want it to be, it has to be usable for the road for customers.

“Secondly, you can make a hybrid car go however fast you like around the Nurburgring, but the development costs might mean that car will end up costing the customer a million dollars or more. Will anyone pay one million dollars for a GT-R?”

We also ask Tamura-san whether the 370Z is the last hurrah for the reborn Z car.

“At some time, everybody has to die,” he says. “When, we don’t know. There have been stories about the Z Car dying, and stories about a new version being released soon .

“Neither is true. These details are only in my head and no one at Nissan has said anything about any of this to journalists. No one knows about these things.

“The Z car will not die while I am working at Nissan though.”

Whatever the future holds for Nismo, though, one thing is certain. Australian fans of the tuning arm of Nissan have to wait a little longer for it to launch locally.


Websites Can Take the Haggle Out of Buying a New Car Before Arriving at an Auto Dealership #cars #guide


#car buying websites
#

Related

The new car purchase is easily one of the most painful and confusing of all shopping experiences. Most business relationships are built on trust, yet there s good reason to distrust nearly everything seen or heard at a car dealership, from complex financing terms, to claims that a certain figure is their absolute best price, to the original, fairly meaningless sticker price on each vehicle s driver-side window. But what if you could eliminate much of the distasteful back-and-forth and just get the car you want, at a price you know is fair?

Do car dealerships lie? Of course! Check out a recent Edmunds.com post. naming five ways car dealership ads fib. One of the most common ways they stretch the truth—or, to be more precise, mislead—is by showing a vehicle with top-of-the-line trim and features, but listing a much-less expensive price for the base model. Even worse, the base price quoted probably doesn t include any fees, the post reads. Fees, of course, add thousands of dollars to the cost of a car.

That s the sort of distortion of the truth one can expect before ever entering a dealership. Once inside, the games really start being played. For example, when a car salesman states a price that s at invoice or even below invoice, the figures being quoted probably have no relationship to what the dealer actually paid for the car. nor to what kind of profit the dealership stands to make.

TrueCar.com. a free web service that gives car buyers trustworthy estimates for a dealer s actual costs and rounds up guaranteed price offers from several dealerships, aims to put an end to some of the games. The New York Times recently reported that car dealerships have felt threatened by TrueCar, and that some have even complained that the site is breaking the law. Both of these can be read as signs that the site is doing its job well.

Dealerships either pay TrueCar a monthly subscription fee, or a flat fee of $299 for each new car it sells as a result of a TrueCar customer lead. The consumer doesn t pay anything upfront to use TrueCar. The site gathers data and states various price estimates, including good and great prices for the vehicle in question, and invites dealerships to deliver guaranteed price quotes (that don t include taxes, title fees, and some other charges) directly to the consumer.

The site doesn t eliminate every hassle and potential trickery in the car-buying experience. The Times notes:

The site may be able to ensure a fair, haggle-free price, but if that drives dealers to compete too fiercely with one another, they will be forced to find other places to turn a profit. So they may lure you into the dealership with a low price, but then make up for it by giving you a poor deal on your trade-in or on the financing.

Even so, making one major headache—haggling—disappear is a terrific service. Any way to make buying a car less stressful, less confusing, and less distasteful will be welcomed by consumers .

And, in all likelihood, more and more consumers will be using TrueCar rather than simply showing up at the dealership itching for an unseemly haggle-fest. One reason this is so is that the TrueCar logo will be flashed in front of the eyeballs of more drivers. Last month, the New York Post reported that TrueCar inked a contract making it Yahoo s exclusive partner for car shoppers:

TrueCar has agreed to pay a minimum of $50 million annually to Yahoo! for the first three years, which [TrueCar CEO Scott] Painter believes will guarantee 10 million unique visitors a month — a deal he thinks will triple the $100 million in annual revenue TrueCar now generates.

The average TrueCar customer reported pays 9.7% less than the sticker price. Under normal circumstances, paying anywhere close to 8% or 9% under sticker price is considered a pretty good deal.

How will car dealerships cope if and when most customers start demanding a standard 10% off the sticker price? It s guaranteed that they re cooking up strategies right now. One that s been tried, and will probably be tried again: Last summer, GM raised sticker prices on many vehicles, and it supposedly did so mainly so that it could later be able to offer bigger, more impressive-seeming discounts at the dealership .

Brad Tuttle covers business and personal finance for TIME. He lives in Massachusetts with his wife and four sons, and also teaches journalism at UMass-Amherst.


What You Need to Know Before You Get an Auto Loan #car #hire #manchester


#car loan
#

Before You Get an Auto Loan

By Justin Pritchard. Banking/Loans Expert

Justin Pritchard helps consumers navigate the world of banking.

For a successful auto purchase, you ve got to get several things right: choose the right car, get a good price, and fund the purchase in the most affordable way. If you re going to borrow for your auto purchase, it pays to know how to get a great auto loan .

Continue Reading Below

Plus, when it s time to make a deal, you ll be ready — and you ll be on the road that much more quickly.

Key to a Great Auto Loan #1: Manage Your Credit

One of the first things you should do before applying for an auto loan is review your credit. All US consumers are entitled to a free credit report under federal law, so exercise your rights. Make sure that your credit looks as good as it possibly can — it will affect the interest rate you get, and therefore your monthly payments. Find out if there’s anything on your reports that needs fixing.

Key to a Great Auto Loan #2: Know How Much You Can Spend

Diligent budgeters already know this, but most people don t put enough thought into it before it s too late. Get a clear idea of how much you can spend (down payment and monthly payments) before you start looking at cars. If you fall in love with a vehicle before you know whether or not it s in your budget, some salespeople can make it appear as if the car is affordable with fancy math and long term loans .

Continue Reading Below

In reality, you ll end up with a loan that costs too much and that you ll be stuck with for years.

Key to a Great Auto Loan #3: Look at the Big Picture

The terms of your auto loan will determine how much you pay now and how much the auto loan costs overall. Remember that a low cost now may not mean low total costs for you in the big picture.

For example, most borrowers choose a low down payment because it’s easy to manage today. However, that choice increases the total cost of your auto loan and usually leaves you ‘upside-down’ (meaning you owe more on the vehicle than it’s worth) for years to come.

Figure out exactly what your loan will look like — month by month — by running your loan details through a loan amortization calculator. You ll learn how much you re spending on interest and how much you ll still owe on any given date in the future.

Key to a Great Auto Loan #4: Consider Insurance

When you ask various lenders what they’ll offer you, you may find that you need insurance to get the best auto loans. I’m referring to disability insurance and life insurance at this point. The lender is concerned that something could happen to you and you won’t be able to pay them back.

Having insurance might not be a requirement, but it might be helpful to have the details of any coverage you have available. Even knowing that you have coverage (even if you don t know how much) can be helpful in moving your purchase along.

Key to a Great Auto Loan #5: Shop Around

This is simple but it is often overlooked. The most important point here is that you don’t have to get your auto loan from the dealership. Check with a credit union. bank, online lender, or P2P lending source. In most cases your car dealer won’t have the best auto loan (but in some cases the dealer s offer can t be beat). By consulting with an alternate lender before stepping onto the lot, you’ll be armed with knowledge of what’s available to you — and that gives you bargaining power.

Things change in life and flexibility is important. Your auto loan should also be flexible. Find a lender that will allow you to make extra payments or pay off the loan entirely without any penalties. It’s important to read the fine print – some penalties aren’t called “penalties”.


6 Things Every Sucker Should Know Before Buying a Used Car #buy #new #car


#buy a used car
#

6 Things Every Sucker Should Know Before Buying a Used Car

By Robert Brockway October 25, 2012 1,279,484 Views

Buying a used car is like going to a dentist who wants to knock out your old teeth and sell you new ones. Everybody involved in the process is assuredly biased, possibly psychotic, and actively wants to do you bodily harm. More sad, dissatisfied people have left car dealerships than strip clubs, and it’s no wonder: Cars are extremely complicated, terribly expensive, and for some reason every one is guarded by a small gang of pathological liars. It’s one of the worst experiences of your life, and you need somebody trustworthy to help you. Unfortunately, you’ve got me. Lucky for you, I have bought and destroyed more cars than is technically allowable by the United States government, and am therefore legally obligated to actually try to help you in this column, which I do as a “service” to the “community.” I think we can get through this, if you take my advice to heart.*

*Well, except for all the times I tell you to “flip the table on them bitches.” That’s just some good general advice I try to work in everywhere, and may not be applicable to the situation at hand.

#6. Do Your Research

Never, ever walk into a dealership “just to see what they’ve got.” Salesmen see that aimless stare on your face and they’re like starving cartoon wolves — they don’t even see a person; all they see is a giant walking turkey leg. Most small and midsize dealerships will have online inventories. Check those out in advance and start looking up the models you’re interested in, then read up on each one: Comb through car sites like Edmunds, click on forum posts by owners, get the specs and find out about users’ experience with reliability — hell, go to Wikipedia and bone up on the entire history of the model and the powertrain you’re considering. Back in school, you’d do the same amount of research for a book report on Huck Finn just because an older lady in a paneled skirt threatened you with the alphabet — you can do the same legwork for a multi-thousand-dollar purchase you’re going to entrust your life to every time you leave the house to get a burrito. Whatever you do, the point is to come in with a mental list: Do not let them steer you outside of that list to a car that you’re not familiar with. Adventure is wondrous and grand, but the used car lot is not the place to listen to strange old men in tattered clothes whisper of magical chariots.

“It’s dangerous to go alone. Take this Daihatsu!”

Now this is the important part, so pay attention: No matter what anybody tells you — no matter how respectable the source — never, ever, ever buy the Kia. Regardless of dealership affiliation, every used car lot on the planet has a dull red Kia out back that they want to show you. It’s going to feel wrong, somehow, like the air around it has gone stale. That’s the universe trying to warn you. There will be rational arguments, and your brain is gonna be all like, “Hey, it sounds like they’ve gotten a lot better lately,” and, “Look, even the car magazines think they’ve got some decent models.” But there’s a very simple explanation for this illusion: It’s a vast government conspiracy and everybody is in on it but me. They are terrible cars that will explode and betray you, no matter how meticulously you care for them. Isn’t that right, Optima, you fickle bitch?! You broke my heart! And for what? A measly 15,000 miles? I thought we had something! I spent two years inside of you. Does that mean nothing?!

#5. Dealing With the Dealer

You need to treat the first few moments at a dealership like an old-timey mobster being interrogated by the coppers: You don’t say nothin’ about nothin’. Financing? What’s that? Trade-ins? Ha, what a hilarious portmanteau of gibberish! Price range? I don’t even speak English.

The first step is just and only to find the car you want, go over it carefully, take stock of any work that needs doing, and barter out the final price. Only when that’s all settled do you talk about trading in something. Why would you discuss trade-ins right up front if you haven’t even found a car you like? You’re not even sure you’re shopping there yet. The grocery store doesn’t pull you aside when you walk in the doors and ask how much you’re planning to spend today. So why do dealerships always want to know your price, payment and trades first? Because it gives them leverage against you: “Oh, well, if we’re going to do you a favor and take this trade-in off your hands, you have to buy one of these pre-selected vehicles.” Or, “Oh, you’re financing? Those aren’t our finance cars. Our finance cars are all dull red Kias; let’s go out back and take a look.”

“Ignore the disembodied voices telling you to flee. That’s a. feature. Ghost-voicing. Costs extra.”

That’s bullshit. Everything is a finance car. Just like everything is a cash car. The car does not care how you pay for it. It is a car. Even if it becomes sentient, it’s mostly only going to care about fighting crime and ramping shit, like K.I.T.T. from Knight Rider. And brother, if that happens: You let it. You buy yourself a leather jacket and a perm and get the fuck out of there; your car search is over.

#4. Vehicle Inspection

There are a few basic things you can check, even if you know nothing about cars. First thing you want to do is get right up close against the side of the front fender. (This should also serve to draw out any potential sentient-car crime-fighting partners, as they cannot resist wisecracking and will likely say something cute like, “Geez, buy me dinner first.” If so, then you’re done: It’s all cowhide coverings and curly hair for the rest of your days.) If there’s little to no rapport between you and the vehicle at this point, just sight down the trim lines to make sure they’re straight with no fluctuations — offset doors, fenders, and uneven lines could indicate frame damage. Look around the engine bay at the spots where the metal struts come together — the joints should be straight, with no signs of recent welding. Take a look underneath the car and watch for rust on the rails, in the wheel wells, or basically anywhere else. Be afraid of rust. Rust is the mind-killer. You’ll think you can take rust — it’s just some pansy little oxidation, right? But you can’t. Rust is better than you. Rust will laugh at your feeble angle grinders; it will spit at your steel wool and mock your puny acids. Rust will shrug off all your mightiest efforts and then, when you are broken, it will take your woman in a way that you never could.

“F. from behind? I don’t know, man; I’m just a chemical process.”

Also remember to CHECK. THE. FUCKING. FLUIDS. Don’t just stare at the engine with your dick in your hand, wondering if you could stop the flywheel with your cock (no matter how awesome it would be to seize a V8 with nothing but your willpower and steely erection, this is not the time for it). Pull those dipsticks out and check the reservoirs. Brake fluid is, in an ideal world, clear to slightly yellowish. But the world we live in is broken and flawed, so it’s usually tea-colored. If it looks like strong coffee, you’re going to need to bleed the brake system, at the very least. That’s a few hundred dollars right there. It doesn’t require a lot of know-how or expensive parts, so you’re going to want to do it yourself.

Do not.

Bleeding brakes is exactly as traumatic as bleeding your only child, only it takes like, four times as long (depending on size and age of child). Check the oil: If it looks like a Wendy’s chocolate Frosty, just turn around and run. Run as fast as you can. Hop into your car and tear ass out of that dealership like The Dukes of Hazzard. That means a blown head-gasket, and it is death. If somebody assures you, “It’ll still run,” you can respond, “So will a man with no legs, if you shoot at him enough; that doesn’t mean he’ll get far.” (The casual murder references let ’em know you mean business.)

“Hi, Bob. Nice to meet you. I’ve killed four men. Every one of them stole from me.”

Make sure the coolant is clear, the transmission fluid is red or purplish (just not black or oily) and all the belts and hoses are free of cracks. Finally, if it’s a new car or a big expense, you buy yourself a copy of a program like Torque, then go on eBay and get an ODBII scanner. Plug that into the car (the ODB slot is usually beneath the dash on the driver’s side) and you can see literally everything about its engine in real time, right there on your smartphone. Do me a favor and look at the salesman’s face when you do it: See that expression? That’s what hope looks like, as it leaves the world. He’s just realized he’s not going to win this one, because you’re from the future — you’ve already done this deal.


Car Reviews – No new Nissan GT-R before 2020, Z-Car will live on #car #supermarket #london


#new car reviews
#

Thread: Car Reviews – No new Nissan GT-R before 2020, Z-Car will live on

Car Reviews – No new Nissan GT-R before 2020, Z-Car will live on

There will be no new GT-R before 2020 and the rumoured death of the Z-car won’t take place under the watch of Chief Product Specialist and Nismo boss Hiroshi Tamura. That’s the message from the 2015 Nismo Festival, where the head of Nismo won’t actually tell us much about what is being worked on behind the scenes, but he is willing to spruik the motorsport link to Nissan – and Nismo’s – DNA.

“That’s a secret, I’m sorry,” he says to most questions we ask him during our brief press conference.

“Nismo is currently present in three markets: Europe, USA and Japan,” Tamura-san tells us. “We are preparing to launch in other markets globally and bring our range of vehicles to those markets. It’s important for Nissan, for Nismo, and it is something we have been working on for some time.”

As we’ve seen in Australia though, the launch of the Nismo brand has dragged on somewhat.

While Nismo is an important part of Tamura-san’s brief, its the GT-R that everyone wants to know about. Pressed on whether the Vision 2020 Concept is in fact the next GT-R, Tamura-san is non-committal, despite admitting that these concepts very often do become the production car.

He also reminds us that the driveline that came into production in the twin-turbo 300ZX had been shown in a concept car some years before. Will the Vision 2020 Concept’s hybrid drivetrain feature in*the next GT-R? Tamura-san won’t commit to an answer on that either.

“If you take a look at the concept we showed in 2001, for example, you can see a lot of that in the current GT-R,” he says. “Sometimes these design models aren’t entirely accurate and, despite having our spiritual DNA within them, things need to be changed to make it to production. We need time to work on and release the evolutionary upgrades – not just for the styling but also the mechanical underpinnings and the engineering.”

It seems, then, that the Vision 2020 Concept is at the very least a window into Nissan and Nismo’s future regarding the new GT-R. Tamura-san is also unwilling to admit that the new GT-R’s release has been delayed by rumoured issues with crash testing in the US specifically, and simply reiterates that engineering work takes time.

Shifting focus slightly, we ask the Nismo boss whether the new GT-R will be designed with a Nurburgring lap time as its most important achievement.

“There is a limit to how far we can push that kind of development,” he says. “Firstly, the GT-R is a road car, so no matter how fast we want it to be, it has to be usable for the road for customers.

“Secondly, you can make a hybrid car go however fast you like around the Nurburgring, but the development costs might mean that car will end up costing the customer a million dollars or more. Will anyone pay one million dollars for a GT-R?”

We also ask Tamura-san whether the 370Z is the last hurrah for the reborn Z car.

“At some time, everybody has to die,” he says. “When, we don’t know. There have been stories about the Z Car dying, and stories about a new version being released soon .

“Neither is true. These details are only in my head and no one at Nissan has said anything about any of this to journalists. No one knows about these things.

“The Z car will not die while I am working at Nissan though.”

Whatever the future holds for Nismo, though, one thing is certain. Australian fans of the tuning arm of Nissan have to wait a little longer for it to launch locally.


What You Need to Know Before You Get an Auto Loan #car #rental #houston


#car loan
#

Before You Get an Auto Loan

By Justin Pritchard. Banking/Loans Expert

Justin Pritchard helps consumers navigate the world of banking.

For a successful auto purchase, you ve got to get several things right: choose the right car, get a good price, and fund the purchase in the most affordable way. If you re going to borrow for your auto purchase, it pays to know how to get a great auto loan .

Continue Reading Below

Plus, when it s time to make a deal, you ll be ready — and you ll be on the road that much more quickly.

Key to a Great Auto Loan #1: Manage Your Credit

One of the first things you should do before applying for an auto loan is review your credit. All US consumers are entitled to a free credit report under federal law, so exercise your rights. Make sure that your credit looks as good as it possibly can — it will affect the interest rate you get, and therefore your monthly payments. Find out if there’s anything on your reports that needs fixing.

Key to a Great Auto Loan #2: Know How Much You Can Spend

Diligent budgeters already know this, but most people don t put enough thought into it before it s too late. Get a clear idea of how much you can spend (down payment and monthly payments) before you start looking at cars. If you fall in love with a vehicle before you know whether or not it s in your budget, some salespeople can make it appear as if the car is affordable with fancy math and long term loans .

Continue Reading Below

In reality, you ll end up with a loan that costs too much and that you ll be stuck with for years.

Key to a Great Auto Loan #3: Look at the Big Picture

The terms of your auto loan will determine how much you pay now and how much the auto loan costs overall. Remember that a low cost now may not mean low total costs for you in the big picture.

For example, most borrowers choose a low down payment because it’s easy to manage today. However, that choice increases the total cost of your auto loan and usually leaves you ‘upside-down’ (meaning you owe more on the vehicle than it’s worth) for years to come.

Figure out exactly what your loan will look like — month by month — by running your loan details through a loan amortization calculator. You ll learn how much you re spending on interest and how much you ll still owe on any given date in the future.

Key to a Great Auto Loan #4: Consider Insurance

When you ask various lenders what they’ll offer you, you may find that you need insurance to get the best auto loans. I’m referring to disability insurance and life insurance at this point. The lender is concerned that something could happen to you and you won’t be able to pay them back.

Having insurance might not be a requirement, but it might be helpful to have the details of any coverage you have available. Even knowing that you have coverage (even if you don t know how much) can be helpful in moving your purchase along.

Key to a Great Auto Loan #5: Shop Around

This is simple but it is often overlooked. The most important point here is that you don’t have to get your auto loan from the dealership. Check with a credit union. bank, online lender, or P2P lending source. In most cases your car dealer won’t have the best auto loan (but in some cases the dealer s offer can t be beat). By consulting with an alternate lender before stepping onto the lot, you’ll be armed with knowledge of what’s available to you — and that gives you bargaining power.

Things change in life and flexibility is important. Your auto loan should also be flexible. Find a lender that will allow you to make extra payments or pay off the loan entirely without any penalties. It’s important to read the fine print – some penalties aren’t called “penalties”.