10 cheapest cars: Why (almost) nobody buys them #0 #car #finance


#cheapest used cars
#

Story Highlights

    Nissan Versa sedan is lowest-price new car at $12,780 Dealers seldom stock bare-bones models Most buyers demand more features

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Cheap new cars can be a disappointment zone.

If you go looking for the $12,780 2014 Nissan Versa sedan that went on sale Tuesday as America’s lowest-price new car, good luck. Dealers almost never stock the lowest-price model.

They say nobody buys the bottom version, and shoppers say that’s because they aren’t available. Automakers say the so-called “take rate” for the lowest-price version of any model runs from 2% to 5%.

Using that new Versa as an example, the bottom-price model has a manual transmission. Few can or will drive a stick-shift nowadays. Moving up to the conventional four-speed automatic adds $1,000.

And you still don’t have the high-mileage version you probably saw advertised.

That’s the one with the CVT (continuously variable-ratio automatic transmission), which is rated an appealing 40 mpg on the highway. Lowest-price CVT model is the S Plus, starting at $14,580, including shipping.

Suddenly, instead of a chops-licking, less-than-$13,000 new car, you’re getting close to $15,000.

At which point buyers often start thinking about nicely equipped, lightly used cars instead of new ones.

It’s not just Nissan. Most automakers price their vehicles that way.

Of course, there’s more profit in even slightly higher-price models, so that’s what car companies want to make and dealers want to keep on the lot and in the showroom.

In addition to being hard to find, bare-bones cars just aren’t that desirable, even among those who swear they “just want basic transportation.” Often “basic” means sans air conditioning, power windows and a radio.

Power windows sounds like a luxury until you picture yourself reaching from the driver’s seat across the car to hand-crank the passenger-side window.

Using Versa again, the average transaction price is $16,092, according to research and shopping site TrueCar.com. Three cars have lower average transaction prices: SmartForTwo ($14,264), Chevrolet Spark ($14,707) and Mazda2 ($15,528).

Transaction price is all-in, out the door, so it includes taxes and license fees as well as factory rebates, shipping and dealer discounts.

And cheap-to-buy often isn’t cheap to own. A low-price vehicle frequently depreciates faster than a more expensive car, so at trade-in time, the gap between the value of what you have and what you want is pretty big. Depreciation is the single biggest cost of owning a car, but often overlooked because it doesn’t hit until years after you buy the car.

The 10 cheapest new cars in the U.S.

The list was complied by kbb.com and USA TODAY research. Rankings are based on sticker prices, including shipping charges. All are 2013 models except the 2014 Versa.

•Nissan Versa S Sedan, $12,780

•Chevrolet Spark LS Hatchback, $12,995

•Smart ForTwo Pure Coupe, $13,240

•Ford Fiesta S Sedan, $13,995

•Kia Rio LX Sedan, $14,350

•Ford Fiesta S Hatchback, $14,995

•Chevrolet Sonic Sedan, $14,995

•Toyota Yaris 3-door, $15,165


7 Sites for Buying, Selling, and Renting Almost Anything #buy #used #cars #online


#car selling websites
#

7 Sites for Buying, Selling, and Renting Almost Anything

Nowadays, it’s hard to imagine the process of buying, selling, or renting without the Internet as a guide. Whether we are trying to find communities of people who buy and sell the same things we do, or are seeking “wisdom of the crowd ” opinion on potential buys, the Internet is often the first place we look. The sites below, we feel, are best at bringing buyers, sellers, and renters together, and arming them with the intel they need to do the deal.

Craigslist. Want ads work so much better on the Web than in print that newspaper want ads are all but extinct. You can buy, sell, or rent just about anything, anywhere on this no-nonsense site.

Freecycle. This grassroots, nonprofit site organizes and connects (via Yahoo Groups ) people who might like to trade items within their own communities. It works really well for finding someone to come over and get that one useless thing out of your house, but not into a landfill.

Zilok. Whereas Freecycle focuses on giving or trading, Zilok fo­­cuses on renting. The site hosts rental listings from people in your community for things you might need to use only once–a power tool, a picnic table, a warehouse space, a van–things you’d usually be far better off renting than buying outright.

CarsDirect. A great place to buy a car online–or at least to get a good starting point on a price–this is the only Web site of its kind that instantly shows you a buy-it-now price, with no haggling and no calls from snaky salespeople .

Zillow. From some of the creators of Expedia comes Zillow, which gathers in one place a bevy of information on properties and their prices in many parts of the United States. If a house is for sale, you can find contact information, read descriptions, and ask questions of the sellers. Plus it’s just fun to see how much your neighbor’s house is worth.

Greenzer. Greenzer brings it down to the local level by helping you choose products from companies that are really walking the walk, not just talking the “green” talk to help their bottom line.

HousingMaps. “Mashups,” to me, have been largely an overhyped, unrealized concept. HousingMaps, however, is a notable exception. It’s a simple mashup of Google Maps and Craigslist housing listings. Choose the part of town in which you want to live, and see what’s available in your price range.

Return to the “ 100 Incredibly Useful and Interesting Web Sites ” main story.

100 Incredibly Useful and Interesting Web Sites


10 cheapest cars: Why (almost) nobody buys them #price #of #used #cars


#cheapest used cars
#

Story Highlights

    Nissan Versa sedan is lowest-price new car at $12,780 Dealers seldom stock bare-bones models Most buyers demand more features

522 CONNECT TWEET 50 LINKEDIN 61 COMMENT EMAIL MORE

Cheap new cars can be a disappointment zone.

If you go looking for the $12,780 2014 Nissan Versa sedan that went on sale Tuesday as America’s lowest-price new car, good luck. Dealers almost never stock the lowest-price model.

They say nobody buys the bottom version, and shoppers say that’s because they aren’t available. Automakers say the so-called “take rate” for the lowest-price version of any model runs from 2% to 5%.

Using that new Versa as an example, the bottom-price model has a manual transmission. Few can or will drive a stick-shift nowadays. Moving up to the conventional four-speed automatic adds $1,000.

And you still don’t have the high-mileage version you probably saw advertised.

That’s the one with the CVT (continuously variable-ratio automatic transmission), which is rated an appealing 40 mpg on the highway. Lowest-price CVT model is the S Plus, starting at $14,580, including shipping.

Suddenly, instead of a chops-licking, less-than-$13,000 new car, you’re getting close to $15,000.

At which point buyers often start thinking about nicely equipped, lightly used cars instead of new ones.

It’s not just Nissan. Most automakers price their vehicles that way.

Of course, there’s more profit in even slightly higher-price models, so that’s what car companies want to make and dealers want to keep on the lot and in the showroom.

In addition to being hard to find, bare-bones cars just aren’t that desirable, even among those who swear they “just want basic transportation.” Often “basic” means sans air conditioning, power windows and a radio.

Power windows sounds like a luxury until you picture yourself reaching from the driver’s seat across the car to hand-crank the passenger-side window.

Using Versa again, the average transaction price is $16,092, according to research and shopping site TrueCar.com. Three cars have lower average transaction prices: SmartForTwo ($14,264), Chevrolet Spark ($14,707) and Mazda2 ($15,528).

Transaction price is all-in, out the door, so it includes taxes and license fees as well as factory rebates, shipping and dealer discounts.

And cheap-to-buy often isn’t cheap to own. A low-price vehicle frequently depreciates faster than a more expensive car, so at trade-in time, the gap between the value of what you have and what you want is pretty big. Depreciation is the single biggest cost of owning a car, but often overlooked because it doesn’t hit until years after you buy the car.

The 10 cheapest new cars in the U.S.

The list was complied by kbb.com and USA TODAY research. Rankings are based on sticker prices, including shipping charges. All are 2013 models except the 2014 Versa.

•Nissan Versa S Sedan, $12,780

•Chevrolet Spark LS Hatchback, $12,995

•Smart ForTwo Pure Coupe, $13,240

•Ford Fiesta S Sedan, $13,995

•Kia Rio LX Sedan, $14,350

•Ford Fiesta S Hatchback, $14,995

•Chevrolet Sonic Sedan, $14,995

•Toyota Yaris 3-door, $15,165


10 cheapest cars: Why (almost) nobody buys them #occasion #auto


#cheapest used cars
#

Story Highlights

    Nissan Versa sedan is lowest-price new car at $12,780 Dealers seldom stock bare-bones models Most buyers demand more features

522 CONNECT TWEET 50 LINKEDIN 61 COMMENT EMAIL MORE

Cheap new cars can be a disappointment zone.

If you go looking for the $12,780 2014 Nissan Versa sedan that went on sale Tuesday as America’s lowest-price new car, good luck. Dealers almost never stock the lowest-price model.

They say nobody buys the bottom version, and shoppers say that’s because they aren’t available. Automakers say the so-called “take rate” for the lowest-price version of any model runs from 2% to 5%.

Using that new Versa as an example, the bottom-price model has a manual transmission. Few can or will drive a stick-shift nowadays. Moving up to the conventional four-speed automatic adds $1,000.

And you still don’t have the high-mileage version you probably saw advertised.

That’s the one with the CVT (continuously variable-ratio automatic transmission), which is rated an appealing 40 mpg on the highway. Lowest-price CVT model is the S Plus, starting at $14,580, including shipping.

Suddenly, instead of a chops-licking, less-than-$13,000 new car, you’re getting close to $15,000.

At which point buyers often start thinking about nicely equipped, lightly used cars instead of new ones.

It’s not just Nissan. Most automakers price their vehicles that way.

Of course, there’s more profit in even slightly higher-price models, so that’s what car companies want to make and dealers want to keep on the lot and in the showroom.

In addition to being hard to find, bare-bones cars just aren’t that desirable, even among those who swear they “just want basic transportation.” Often “basic” means sans air conditioning, power windows and a radio.

Power windows sounds like a luxury until you picture yourself reaching from the driver’s seat across the car to hand-crank the passenger-side window.

Using Versa again, the average transaction price is $16,092, according to research and shopping site TrueCar.com. Three cars have lower average transaction prices: SmartForTwo ($14,264), Chevrolet Spark ($14,707) and Mazda2 ($15,528).

Transaction price is all-in, out the door, so it includes taxes and license fees as well as factory rebates, shipping and dealer discounts.

And cheap-to-buy often isn’t cheap to own. A low-price vehicle frequently depreciates faster than a more expensive car, so at trade-in time, the gap between the value of what you have and what you want is pretty big. Depreciation is the single biggest cost of owning a car, but often overlooked because it doesn’t hit until years after you buy the car.

The 10 cheapest new cars in the U.S.

The list was complied by kbb.com and USA TODAY research. Rankings are based on sticker prices, including shipping charges. All are 2013 models except the 2014 Versa.

•Nissan Versa S Sedan, $12,780

•Chevrolet Spark LS Hatchback, $12,995

•Smart ForTwo Pure Coupe, $13,240

•Ford Fiesta S Sedan, $13,995

•Kia Rio LX Sedan, $14,350

•Ford Fiesta S Hatchback, $14,995

•Chevrolet Sonic Sedan, $14,995

•Toyota Yaris 3-door, $15,165